Spending constraints associated with a higher than expected number of deaths

Study published in the British Medical Journal suggests cuts to public funding of health and social care since 2010 could be linked to almost 120,000 excess deaths in England | BMJ | OnMedica

The study reports that between 2010 and 2014, the NHS in England had a real-term annual increase in funding of 1.3%, despite rising patient demand and healthcare costs. Real-term spend on social care has fallen by 1.19% every year during the same period.

Researchers compared actual death rates for 2011 to 2014 with those that would be expected, based on trends before spending cuts came into play, and taking account of national and economic factors, such as unemployment rates and pensions.

The researchers’ analysis of the data showed that between 2001 and 2010, deaths in England fell by an average of 0.77% every year, but rose by an average of 0.87% every year between 2011 and 2014.

The spending restraints were associated with 45,368 higher than expected numbers of deaths between 2010 and 2014 compared with equivalent trends before 2010.

Full reference: Watkins J. et al. |  Effects of health and social care spending constraints on mortality in England: a time trend analysis | BMJ Open 2017

Related: Excess deaths could be linked to health spending cuts

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