[NICE Consultation] Community pharmacies: promoting health and wellbeing

NICE | September 2019 | Community pharmacies: promoting health and wellbeing | In development [GID-QS10115]

NICE is consulting on community pharmacies’ roles in promoting health and welbeing, NICE wants to hear about the 5 key areas for quality improvement which you consider as having the greatest potential to improve the quality of care in this area.

Closing date for comments: Wednesday 2 October 2019 at 5pm

Full details are available from NICE

Stoptober campaign

Public Health England | September 2019 | Stoptober helping you split up with smoking this October 

Resources for this year’s Stoptober campaign include an app, email support, tips to quick and case studies from individuals who have quit smoking. 

nhs.uk
Image source: nhs.uk

See the full range of resources from Public Health England 

Of interest:

Statistics on NHS Stop Smoking Services in England April 2018 to March 2019

New e-learning programme launched on caring for people bereaved through pregnancy loss and baby death

Health Education England | September 2019 | New e-learning programme launched on caring for people bereaved through pregnancy loss and baby death

The first two sessions of the new National Bereavement Care Pathway: Supporting Parents for Pregnancy and Neonatal Loss e-learning programme are now available. The training programme has been written to share the elements of good bereavement care. It is being delivered by Health Education e-Learning for Healthcare (HEE e-LfH) team in partnership with Sands and a collaboration of other charities, professional organisations and people with first-hand experience of bereavement.

The programme is divided into two courses

Bereavement Care after Pregnancy Loss or Baby Death – Learning for All

Bereavement Care after Pregnancy Loss or Baby Death – Healthcare Professionals

Further details are available from Health Education England

NHS spends around £3bn a year on ‘avoidable’ treatment for diabetes

ITV | September 2019 | NHS spends around £3bn a year on ‘avoidable’ treatment for diabetes

An analysis of hospital treatment in 2017/18 highlights that approximately £5.5bn each year is spent on treatment of diabetes, of this an estimated £3bn is on ‘potentially avoidable’ treatment. The authors of the research explain that this equates to around one-tenth of the NHS budget; compared to people without diabetes, the average annual cost of planned care was over twice as high for those with Type 2 diabetes and the average cost of emergency care was three times higher, once age was taken into account.

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Study author, Dr Adrian Heald from Salford Royal Hospital, said: “People with diabetes are admitted to hospital more often, especially as emergencies, and stay on average longer as inpatients.

“These increased hospital costs, 40% of which come from non-elective and emergency care, are three times higher than the current costs of diabetes medication.

“Improved management of diabetes by GPs and diabetes specialist care teams could improve the health of people with diabetes and substantially reduce the level of hospital care and costs.” (Source: ITV News)

The team’s finding will be presented this week at the European Association for the study of Diabetes (EASD)  annual meeting in Barcelona.

Read the full story from ITV News

See also:

BT NHS spends around £3bn a year on ‘avoidable’ treatment for diabetes

 

Physical activity e-learning course

Health Education England | September 2019| New e-learning programme to champion physical activity for patients launched

A new physical activity e-learning course has been designed by Health Education England, alongside Public Health England and Sport England, to help healthcare professionals to champion physical activity with patients.

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This e-learning course prepares GPs, nurses and other healthcare professionals to champion the benefits of physical activity with their patients and, in doing so, help prevent and manage a range of common physical and mental health conditions

The course includes:

  • Motivational Interviewing [‘how to’ video]
  • A guide to “Promoting Physical Activity in Primary Care” 

It also gives a comprehensive guide to the use of physical activity in the clinical management of long-term conditions including: cancer, cardiovascular conditions, diabetes, musculoskeletal health and mental health.

Full details from HEE e-LfH

BMJ: Cancer screening uptake- only a third of women take up offers

Torjesen, I. | 2019| Cancer screening: only a third of women in England take up all offers |BMJ| 366 | l5588 | doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.l5588

Research findings highlighted in the BMJ indicates that of the screening services offered to women in their 60s, which include cervical, breast and bowel screening only a third attend these screening sessions.  

The study included over 3000 women aged between 60-65 who had responded to their last invitations from each of these three screening programmes.

Results showed that:

  • 35% took part in all three screening programmes;
  • 37% participated in two programmes;
  • 17% accessed one type of screening; and
  • 10% were not screened at all.

They found that in the last screening round, 2525 (83%) had taken up mammography, 1908 (62%) cervical screening, and 1635 (53%) bowel cancer screening, which is consistent with the proportions reported in the official statistics for England (78%, 58-59%, and 57-59%, respectively).

The researchers also explored area level correlations between participation in the three screening programmes and various population characteristics for all English general practices with complete data in the Fingertips database curated by Public Health England. This database reports health related data for England aggregated by administrative area.

General practices with higher proportions of unemployed patients and smokers had a lower rate of take-up of all three screening programmes. Conversely, general practices from areas with less deprivation, with more patients who are carers or have chronic illnesses themselves, and with more patients satisfied with the provided service were significantly more likely to attain high coverage rates in all programmes (Source:  Torjesen, 2019).

To determine how many women participate in all three recommended cancer screening programmes (breast, cervical, and bowel). During their early 60s, English women receive an invitation from all the three programmes.

For 3060 women aged 60–65 included in an England-wide breast screening case–control study, we investigated the number of screening programmes they participated in during the last invitation round. Additionally, using the Fingertips database curated by Public Health England, we explored area-level correlations between participation in the three cancer screening programmes and various population characteristics for all 7014 English general practices with complete data.

Results

Of the 3060 women, 1086 (35%) participated in all three programmes, 1142 (37%) in two, 526 (17%) in one, and 306 (10%) in none. Participation in all three did not appear to be a random event (p  less than 0.001). General practices from areas with less deprivation, with more patients who are carers or have chronic illnesses themselves, and with more patients satisfied with the provided service were significantly more likely to attain high coverage rates in all programmes.

Only a minority of English women is concurrently protected through all recommended cancer screening programmes. Future studies should consider why most women participate in some but not all recommended screening.

The article is published in the Journal of Medical Screening, a copy can be requested by Rotherham NHS staff here

 

See also: King’s College London Only a third of women take up all offered cancer screenings, new research finds

BMJ Cancer screening: only a third of women in England take up all offers

National Maternity and Perinatal Audit (NMPA) clinical report 2019

Health Quality Improvement Partnership | September 2019 | National Maternity and Perinatal Audit (NMPA) clinical report 2019

The National Maternity and Perinatal Audit (NMPA) aims to improve the treatment of mothers and babies during their stay in a maternity unit by evaluating a range of care processes and outcomes in order to identify good practice and areas for improvement.

hqip.org.uk
Image source: hqip.org.uk

This clinical report presents measures of maternity and perinatal care based on births in English, Welsh and Scottish NHS services between 1 April 2016 and 31 March 2017. It builds on the NMPA’s previous report from 2015/16 with some additional measures.  While the report’s authors acknowledge it  is not possible to speak of trends based on just two years, but instead highlight areas that require monitoring, in particular around induction of labour, timing of birth and timely delivery of babies that are small for gestational age.

National Maternity and Perinatal Audit (NMPA) clinical report 2019