National Diet and Nutrition Survey

Public Health England & Food Standards Agency | January 2019 |National Diet and Nutrition Survey: Years 1 to 9 of the Rolling Programme (2008/2009 – 2016/2017): Time trend and income analyses

Public Health England & Food Standards Agency have published the National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS RP), the survey takes place annually using a representative sample (of around 1000 people: 500 adults and 500 children) take part in the NDNS RP each year. The NDNS RP comprises an interview, a 4-day estimated diet diary, physical measurements and a blood and urine sample.

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Key findings: 

  • There was little change in intake of fruit and vegetables over the 9-year period.
  • All age/sex groups had a mean fruit and vegetable intake below the 5 A Day
    recommendation over the 9-year period.
  • There was a downward linear trend in intake of fruit juice over time among consumers in all age/sex groups although there was little change in the proportions drinking it.
  • There was little change in intake of oily fish over the 9-year period while intake of red and processed meat showed a downward trend over time.
  • Over the 9 years, the proportion of children consuming sugar-sweetened soft drinks dropped by 26, 35 and 17 percentage points for those aged 1.5 to 3 years, 4 to 10 years and 11 to 18 years respectively.
  • For those children who drank sugar-sweetened soft drinks, intake also fell significantly over time. (Source: Public Health England & Food Standards Agency)

Read the full report National Diet and Nutrition Survey

NICE: Offer digital CBT to young people with mild depression

NICE |  January 2019 | Offer digital CBT to young people with mild depression, says NICE

Children and young people can be offered digital cognitive behavioural therapy (digital CBT, also known as computer CBT) as a first-line treatment for mild depression, says NICE. Currently digital CBT is recommended for adults with mild to moderate depression. 

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NICE says that the choice of treatment should be based on clinical need and patient and carer preferences. The child or young person’s history, circumstances and maturity should also be considered.

Digital CBT is delivered on mobile phones, tablets or computers, meaning users can access help quickly, avoiding waiting lists.

This draft recommendation is made in a fast-tracked update to NICE’s existing guideline on depression in children and young people aged 5 to 18. It follows a recent trial (published in The Lancet)  which showed the benefits young people can gain from psychological therapies.

Digital CBT is already recommended for adults with mild to moderate depression (Source: NICE)

Read the full news story from NICE Offer digital CBT to young people with mild depression, NICE says 

See NICE Depression in children and young people: identification and management

See also:

The Lancet Cognitive behavioural therapy and short-term psychoanalytical psychotherapy versus a brief psychosocial intervention in adolescents with unipolar major depressive disorder (IMPACT): a multicentre, pragmatic, observer-blind, randomised controlled superiority trial 

Healthy shopper? Blood pressure testing in a shopping centre Pop-Up in England

Eureka Alert | January 2019 | Possible link found between cases of high blood pressure and ‘unhealthy’ shopping centers

A study that used ‘Pop up health stations’ in shopping centres in England Invited passers-by to have a test to screen for signs of the eye disease, glaucoma, eye test and in half of cases a blood pressure test was also offered to  shoppers. 

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The researchers from City University London classed outlets in shopping centres across 7 different shopping centres. This included the ‘unhealthiest’ shopping centres and the three ‘healthiest’ shopping centres corresponding with a a Royal Society of Public Health (RSPH) report ranking UK town and city shopping centres based on their ‘unhealthy’ and ‘healthy’ retail outlets.  Shopping centres were considered ‘unhealthy’; if these outlets were a fast-food takeaway, a bookmaker, a tanning salon or a payday loan business.

The researchers also produced a basic score of each shopping centre’s ‘unhealthiness’, which was the proportion of ‘unhealthy’ retail outlets open on the day of testing relative to the total number of retail outlets open in the shopping centre.

At the three ‘healthy’ shopping complexes (Bristol, Cambridge and Nottingham),  13 per cent of adults (20 out of 152 adults) were flagged as having readings of high blood pressure on repeat testing.

In the ‘unhealthy’ shopping centres (Coventry, Preston, Northampton, Stoke-on-Trent), over 22 per cent of adults (45 out of 199 adults) had high blood pressure readings.

The study has identified an association between instances of ‘suspected hypertension’ and the unhealthiness of the shopping centre, with people with BP of 140/90 mmHg (Source: Eureka Alert).

Eureka Alert Possible link found between cases of high blood pressure and ‘unhealthy’ shopping centers

The article is available to read and download from Public Health BMC 

Abstract

Background

Improving detection of elevated blood pressure (BP) remains a public health need. We present results from a Pop-Up health check stationed in shopping centres in England. We hypothesise the rate of case detection is related to measurable ‘unhealthiness’ of the shopping centres.

Methods

A Pop-Up health check was sited in four and three shopping centres sampled from the top ten unhealthiest and top 15 healthiest shopping regions respectively, following a report ranking towns/cities based on their unhealthy and healthy retail outlets. On one day in each shopping centre, people were approached and consented to BP testing. Outcome measure was people flagged with BP ≥ 140/90 mmHg (cases).

Results

We detected 45 (22.6%) and 20 (13.1%) cases from testing 199 and 152 adults in the unhealthy and healthy locations respectively . A measure of unhealthy retail outlets (e.g. fast-food outlets) within each shopping centre was associated with detection rate.

Conclusion

An association exists between cases of suspect hypertension found in a health check Pop-Up and measured ‘unhealthiness’ of the shopping centre site. Results hint at strategies for public testing of BP, potentially in the context of reducing health inequalities.

Improving detection of elevated blood pressure (BP) remains a public health need. We present results from a Pop-Up health check stationed in shopping centres in England. We hypothesise the rate of case detection is related to measurable ‘unhealthiness’ of the shopping centres.

Methods

A Pop-Up health check was sited in four and three shopping centres sampled from the top ten unhealthiest and top 15 healthiest shopping regions respectively, following a report ranking towns/cities based on their unhealthy and healthy retail outlets. On one day in each shopping centre, people were approached and consented to BP testing. Outcome measure was people flagged with BP ≥ 140/90 mmHg (cases).

Results

We detected 45 (22.6%) and 20 (13.1%) cases from testing 199 and 152 adults in the unhealthy and healthy locations respectively. A measure of unhealthy retail outlets (e.g. fast-food outlets) within each shopping centre was associated with detection rate.

Conclusion

An association exists between cases of suspect hypertension found in a health check Pop-Up and measured ‘unhealthiness’ of the shopping centre site. Results hint at strategies for public testing of BP, potentially in the context of reducing health inequalities.

 

Full reference:

Edwards, L.A., Campbell, P., Taylor, D.J., Shah, R., Edgar, D.F., Crabb, D. P.| 2019| Healthy shopper? Blood pressure testing in a shopping centre Pop-Up in England | BMC Public Health|1942 |https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-018-6370-0

Patient Safety Collaboratives

NHS Improvement| January 2019 | Patient Safety Collaboratives: A retrospective review 

Almost five years since the establishment of  Patient Safety  Collaboratives (PSCs), NHS Improvement  commissioned a review (in 2018) to better understand the mechanics of the delivery of PSCs, the impact of the programme, and to make recommendations for the recommissioning of the PSCs.

he operational delivery and impact of the Patient Safety Collaborative programme. This report gives its findings and recommendations to strengthen the programme, i.

This review makes 13 recommendations to strengthen the programme, including greater collective focus on priority workstreams and alignment to the forthcoming patient safety strategy, building on momentum achieved to date, and informs the future operating model and commission for the PSCs (Source: NHS England).

NHS Improvement Patient Safety Collaboratives A retrospective review

Sheffield Health and Social Care NHS Foundation Trust: living well with back pain course

NHS England | January 2019 | Sheffield Health and Social Care NHS Foundation Trust: living well with back pain course

A course developed at Sheffield Health and Social Care NHS Foundation Trust by dual-trained specialists, combines psychological therapy with physical health services to help patients with back pain remain active and prevent frailty. The course combines physical and mental health to  support patients experiencing chronic pain. 

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Two-thirds of people with a common mental health problem also have a long-term physical health condition, greatly increasing the pain they are in and the cost of their care. By integrating psychological therapy with physical health services, the NHS can provide a more efficient support to this group of people and achieve better outcomes (Source: NHS England).

Read the full story here

Rural health care: A rapid review of the impact of rurality on the costs of delivering health care

Nuffield Trust | January 2019 | Rural health care: A rapid review of the impact of rurality on the costs of delivering health care

The Nuffield Trust was commissioned by the National Centre for Rural Health and Care to explore the key issues around the impact of rurality and sparsity on the costs of delivering health care.

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Image source: nuffieldtrust.org.uk

 

 

The aims of the review were to:

  • outline the policy considerations around accounting for unavoidable costs in providing health care in rural areas
  • review and summarise key evidence on the additional costs of delivering health care in rural areas
  • describe, quantify and critique current NHS allocation formulae in the four UK nations with respect to adjustments for rurality.

Their analysis suggests that while the association between rurality, overstretched services and financial pressure are unclear, NHS trusts with ‘unavoidably small’ sites do appear to underperform: as well as having generally longer waiting times and lengths of stay, they are also in greater financial difficulty.

The report can be downloaded from Nuffield Trust

Rural health care: A rapid review of the impact of rurality on the costs of delivering health care [Press release]

Improving Mentorship at North Staffordshire Combined Healthcare NHS Trust

NHS England | January 2019 | Improving Mentorship at North Staffordshire Combined Healthcare NHS Trust

Staff at North Staffordshire Combined Healthcare NHS Trust improved mentorship for mentors and practice educators by devising a new programme to include feedback for staff who mentor. This has now been published as a case study available in full from  NHS England’s Atlas of Shared Learning.

The Practice, Education and Preceptorship lead nurse identified through existing Mentors and Practice Educators that they received little feedback or support for the mentorship they provided.

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Students on Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) approved pre-registration nursing education programmes must be supported and assessed by mentors. Mentors are responsible and accountable for:

  • Organising and co-ordinating student learning activities in practice;
  • Supervising students in learning situations and providing them with constructive feedback on their achievements;
  • Setting and monitoring achievement of realistic learning objectives;
  • Assessing total performance – including skills, attitudes and behaviours;
  • Liaising with others (e.g. mentors, sign-off mentors, practice facilitators, practice teachers, personal tutors, programme leaders) to provide feedback, identify any concerns about performance and agree action as appropriate;
  • Providing evidence for, or acting as, sign-off mentors – making decisions about achievement of proficiency at the end of a programme.

The nurse lead in the Practice Education Team collated feedback from mentors and practice educators. A programme of work was developed and agreed, this included a new programme of education and training for staff, additional resources for support and supportive forums, events and networks to ensure mentors feel valued.

The programme aimed to:

  • Increase support available to the mentors;
  • Increase visibility in clinical areas of leads;
  • Be the central point of contact for mentors & students;
  • Improve communication;
  • Address unwarranted variation in practice;
  • Develop strengths and celebrate them;
  • Increase the number of AHP students the Trust was mentoring.

The impact of the programme- included enhanced patient care and experience, it increaserience, more confident students, nurses & Allied Health Partners (AHPs) and increased staff satisfaction and morale.

Due to the success of the programme, the team are now planning how to implement the new NMC Education Standards as well as reaching out to more local universities to increase capacity and support (Source: NHS England)

Read the full news item from NHS England