The Impact Of Homelessness On Health

New report warns that that the rising number of older homeless will create significant extra pressures for councils | Local Government Association

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The Local Government Association (LGA) says that older homelessness is a growing hidden phenomenon that needs greater understanding.  Latest figures show that between April and June this year, councils accepted 620 people aged over 60 as homeless – at a rate of nearly 10 a day. This is up from the 270 accepted between October and December 2009, which was the lowest number since records began in 2005.

The LGA, which represents more than 370 councils in England and Wales, is warning that based on existing trends, this is set to double by 2025.

The LGA is calling for government to address the undersupply in specialist housing for older people, and an adaption to the implementation of welfare reforms to reduce the risk of homelessness. It says councils need to be able to borrow to invest in new council housing to increase supply, boost home ownership and reduce homelessness.

Full report: The Impact of Homelessness on Health: A guide for Local Authorities

 

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NHS staff who refuse flu vaccine this winter will have to give reasons

NHS staff who refuse to have the flu vaccine this winter will have to give reasons to their employer, as leaders make efforts to improve take-up rates|  BMJ 2017359 

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Image source: Daniel Dionne – Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

 NHS leaders are to write to all NHS staff urging them to be vaccinated against flu as soon as possible. The letter will make it clear that staff who refuse the vaccine will have to give reasons to their employing NHS trust, which will then be recorded.

The heads of NHS England, Public Health England, the Department of Health for England, and NHS Improvement said that they were writing to remind staff of their “professional duty to protect their patients.” Trusts are also being urged to make the flu vaccine “readily available” to staff.

Although last year saw record take-up of the vaccine among staff, more than a third of NHS staff members did not take up the offer, with just a fifth being vaccinated in some trusts.

Hospitals and GP surgeries are being warned by NHS England to be prepared for a big increase in cases of flu this winter after a heavy season in the southern hemisphere.

Full story via BMJ 2017359 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.j4766

Each Baby Counts

Each Baby Counts 2015 | The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

In the UK, each year over 1000 babies die or are left with severe brain injury because something goes wrong during labour.

Each Baby Counts is the RCOG’s national quality improvement programme to reduce the number of babies who die or are left severely disabled as a result of such incidents occurring during term labour.

The report presents key findings and recommendations based on the analysis of complete data relating to term stillbirths, neonatal deaths and babies with brain injuries born during 2015, the first full year of the programme.

Full report: Each baby counts

 

Mental health staff and services under pressure

Cuts to mental health leave staff facing violence and aggression, says UNISON

A recent UNISON survey of staff working in mental health service has revealed that
mental health services have been hit hard by cuts to NHS funding, which has a damaging effect on service users and staff. The new publication reports that Service users have been struggling to access the help they need, while mental health staff working in under-resourced areas are left vulnerable to violence and aggression, and unable to provide the level of care needed.

The report, Struggling to Cope, is based on a survey of over 1,000 mental health employees across the UK, who work in a range of roles – with children and adults in hospitals, in secure units and out in the community.

More than two in five (42%) said they had been on the receiving end of violent attacks in the last year. Over a third (36%) said they had witnessed violent incidents involving patients attacking their colleagues.

While the majority (86%) felt they had the knowledge and training to carry out their work safely, more than a third (36%) said they had seen an increase in violent incidents in the past year.

Mental health workers blamed staff shortages (87%) and the overuse of agency staff (49%) as the main reasons behind the rise in violent attacks.

Full report: Struggling to Cope: Mental health staff and services under pressure

Commissioning mental health services in primary care

Of primary importance: commissioning mental health services in primary care  | NHS Clinical Commissioners

This report highlights projects where CCGs and their partners are delivering better care for patients, working across the boundaries between physical and mental health, as well as health and social care, while at the same time reducing pressure on GPs and hospitals.

Developed by NHS Clinical Commissioner’s Mental Health Commissioners Network, the report aims to share learning and good practice from these projects to help support others looking to implement projects across primary care.

Case studies in the report include:

  • Community Living Well in West London which helps those with long-term mental health conditions and covers a full range of psychological therapies from guided self-help, through to sessions of short-term psychodynamic or CBT, carers therapy and a wellbeing service.
  • Work in Sheffield where IAPT workers are attached to each of the CCG’s individual 85 practices, and are incorporated as part of the practice multidisciplinary team.
  • The Well Centre, a primary care health centre in Lambeth for young people aged 13 to 20 offering support with all areas of health including mental wellbeing.

Full report available here

Quality improvement

Making the case for quality improvement: lessons for NHS boards and leaders | The King’s Fund | The Health Foundation

This briefing outlines the following ten lessons for NHS leaders which provide a starting point for those seeking to embed quality improvement in their work:

  • Make quality improvement a leadership priority for boards.
  • Share responsibility for quality improvement with leaders at all levels.
  • Don’t look for magic bullets or quick fixes.
  • Develop the skills and capabilities for improvement.
  • Have a consistent and coherent approach to quality improvement.
  • Use data effectively.
  • Focus on relationships and culture.
  • Enable and support frontline staff to engage in quality improvement.
  • Involve patients, service users and carers.
  • Work as a system.

The briefing makes the case for quality improvement to be at the heart of local plans for redesigning NHS services.

Full report available here