Improving new starter turnover: case study

NHS Employers

East-Kent-Starter-Turnover

Source: NHS Employers

This case study outlines how East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust worked to improve experiences of staff in their first year of employment at the trust. The trust improved the overall on-boarding experience including starting induction before day one in the role and introducing an online portal for new starters, along with the benefits and the challenges of doing so. This work has resulted in an improvement in new starter turnover of nearly 20 per cent.

Advertisements

Implementation guide and resource pack for dementia care

NHS England has published a new dementia guide that sets out what good quality assessment, diagnosis and care looks like in relation to formal guidance, in addition to the views and expectations of people living with dementia and their carers.

The guide is shaped by the framework set by the NHS Mandate and has two clear requirements to enhance dementia care, through:

increasing the number of people being diagnosed with dementia, and starting treatment, within six weeks from referral; and
improving the quality of post-diagnostic treatment and support for people with dementia and their carers.
This guide is support by:

Good care planning guide for dementia
RightCare dementia pathway scenario

Stepping forward to 2020/21: the mental health workforce plan for England

Health Education England, July 2017

This plan sets out measures to expand the mental health workforce in England and fulfil ambitions to improve mental health services. By 2020 to 2021 local areas will need to create 21,000 new posts in priority growth areas to deliver the improvements in services and support set out in the Five year forward view for mental health.

NICE recommends GPs develop a national autism register

GPs could be asked to develop a national autism register to help end the ‘invisibility’ of autistic people in the health system | GP Online

screen-1839500_1280

NICE has recommended the register be implemented with a new QOF indicator.

The proposal follows the findings of the Westminster Commission on Autism, set up by the National Children’s Group and chaired by Labour MP Barry Sheerman. Its report found that 76% of autistic people and parents said their GP did not make any reasonable adjustments for them or their autistic child. The report said this was an indication that health professionals may not consistently identify and make accommodations for the needs of autistic people.

NICE said a register would make autistic patients more easily identifiable to healthcare professionals in GP practices and help staff adapt their approach to suit patients’ needs.

For example, NICE said, it would allow staff to arrange for autistic children to come for vaccinations at quieter times and turn lights down for those with sensory problems.

Read the full news story here

Reality Check: More mental health staff for the NHS?

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt has said there will be 21,000 more nurses, therapists and consultants working in mental health services in England by 2021 | BBC News

coins-1523383_1920

But the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) has questioned whether there is enough money and how these posts are going to filled. BBC Reality Check looked at who’s likely to be right. We’re talking about England because the running of health services is devolved to the other nations.

The government has pledged to spend an extra £1bn already promised for mental health services in England on the new staff. This is not new money from the Treasury but comes from existing NHS budgets.

Experts from the Nuffield Trust, a think-tank specialising in health policy, say £1bn would be more than enough to fund 21,000 nurses. Although we don’t know how many of the new jobs will be for nurses and how many will be for consultants – and of course their salaries vary widely – it seems the plan is roughly affordable, albeit with money that has to be found from elsewhere in NHS budgets.

But that still leaves the question of whether staff can be recruited to fill the posts in such a short timeframe.

Read the full news story here

Attitudes on cost-effectiveness and equity: viewpoints of medical professionals

The aim of this study is to determine the attitudes of physicians and trainees in regard to the roles of both cost-effectiveness and equity in clinical decision making | BMJ Open

11554-2

Cost-effectiveness analysis does not accurately reflect the importance that medical professionals place on equity. Among medical professionals, practising physicians appear to be more egalitarian than residents-in-training, while medical students appear to be most utilitarian and cost-effective. Meanwhile, female respondents in all three cohorts favoured the more equitable option to a greater degree than their male counterparts. Healthcare policies that trade off equity in favour of cost-effectiveness may be unacceptable to many medical professionals, especially practising physicians and women.

Full reference: Li, D.G. et al. (2017) Attitudes on cost-effectiveness and equity: a cross-sectional study examining the viewpoints of medical professionals. BMJ Open 7:e017251.