Parents’ phone addiction may lead to child behavioural problems

Study suggests that when parents report being distracted by digital technology, this causes interruptions in interactions with their children. | story via The Guardian

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A recent study investigated the impact of “technoference” – when people switch their attention away from others to check their phone or tablet.

The study, carried out in the US, involved more than 300 parents who reported on their use of digital technology, to see if they felt it affected interactions with their children and actual child behaviours. A range of technology devices were studied, including smartphones, computers, television and tablets.

It found half of parents reported that their use of technology disrupted interactions with their child three or more times a day. Behavioural problems in children were linked to these disruptions.

Key findings:

  • On average, mothers and fathers reported about two devices as interfering in their interactions with their child at least once or more on a typical day.
  • Parents reporting problematic use of digital technology (40% of mothers and 32% of fathers) was correlated with technoference with their child.
  • Perceived technoference in mother-child interactions was linked to child behavioural problems – both externalising and internalising behaviour – as rated by mothers and fathers.
  • However, perceived technoference in father-child interactions was not linked to behavioural issues.
  • Only 11% of parents reported that technoference did not occur and 48% reported three or more times on a typical day.

Read more via The Guardian

Full reference: McDaniel BT, Radesky JS. Technoference: Parent Distraction With Technology and Associations With Child Behavior Problems. Child Development. Published online May 10 2017

 

 

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Mental health issues higher in public sector workers

Survey from Mental Health charity, Mind finds a higher prevalence of mental health problems in the public sector, as well as a lack of support available when people do speak up.

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The charity surveyed over 12,000 employees across the public and private sectors and found that public sector workers were more likely to say their mental health was poor than their peers in the private sector (15% versus 9%), and far more likely to say they had felt anxious at work on several occasions over the last month (53% compared to 43%).

Public sector workers were more likely to disclose that they had a mental health problem (90% versus 80% in the private sector), were more likely to be honest about the reason for needing time off (69% versus 59%), and more likely to report that the workplace culture made it possible for people to speak openly about their mental health (38% versus 29%).

However, when public sector employees admitted mental health problems, less than half (49%) of them said they felt supported, compared with 61% of staff from the private sector.

Full story: Mind reveals shocking differences in mental health support for public & private sector workers

Person-centred care for older people in care homes

The Social Care Institute for Excellence has published  Person-centred care for older people in care homes

This resource covers the implications of the personalisation agenda for owners and managers of care homes. It summarises information, advice and guidance which will support care home owners and managers as they develop a person-centred (or personalised) approach to care in their homes.

The resource covers the following areas:

Download the full publication: Person-centred care for older people in care homes

Video: What is person-centred care?

 

Social Care and the NHS

The Kings Fund has released the fourth and final video in its ‘Bite-sized social care’ series Social care, the NHS and other services.   This short video explains the importance of different services working together to provide care.

 

Other ‘Bite-sized social care’ videos from the Kings Fund:

Improving quality and safety in healthcare

NHS Improvement has published a shared learning resource on Improving quality and safety in healthcare. 

This resource contains case studies from providers that have been rated ‘good’ for safety by the Care Quality Commission.  They offer practical guidance to developing and spreading good practice on the following:

Read more at NHS Improvement

Drinking coffee may help prevent liver cancer, study suggests

People who drink more coffee are less likely to develop liver cancer, an analysis of data from 26 studies has found | Story via The Guardian | BMJ

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Researchers have found that people who drink more coffee are less likely to develop hepatocellular cancer (HCC), the most common form of primary liver cancer – and the effect was also found in decaffeinated coffee.

Experts from the University of Southampton and the University of Edinburgh examined data from 26 studies involving more than 2.25 million participants.  Compared with people who drank no coffee, those who drank one cup a day had a 20% lower risk of developing HCC, according to the study, published in the journal BMJ Open.

Those who consumed two cups a day had a 35% reduced risk and for those who drank five cups, the risk was halved. They found the protective effect for decaf was “smaller and less certain than for caffeinated coffee”

Full story via The Guardian

Full reference: Kennedy OJ, Roderick P, Buchanan R, et al. Coffee, including caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, and the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma: a systematic review and dose–response meta-analysis

 

‘Worryingly’ high levels of suicide amongst people with autism

Suicide rates among people with autism in England have reached “worryingly” high levels, according to experts writing in The Lancet Psychiatry. | Story via OnMedica

The researchers – from Coventry and Newcastle universities – say the issue remains poorly understood and that action is urgently needed to help those most at risk.

Dr Sarah Cassidy from Coventry University cites a clinical study she led in 2014 in which 66% of adults newly diagnosed with Asperger Syndrome (AS) reported having contemplated suicide. In the same study, which remains the most recent clinical research into suicidality in autism, 35% of the 365 respondents newly diagnosed with AS said they had planned or attempted to end their own life, with 31% reporting that they suffered depression.

A 2016 population study in Sweden also concluded that suicide is a leading cause of premature death in people with autism spectrum disorder.

Full story at OnMedica

Full reference: Cassidy S, Rodgers J. Understanding and prevention of suicide in autism. The Lancet Psychiatry, published 24 May 2017.