Antibiotic awareness

Public Health England has updated the following documents concerning the use of antibiotics:

Additional link: NICE press release

Emergency bowel surgery audit

The Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership has published Third Patient Report of the National Emergency Laparotomy Audit (NELA) December 2015 to November 2016.  This report includes data from the second Organisational Audit performed in October 2016 and from the third annual cycle of patient-data collection. The Organisational Audit provides information on how hospitals have organised their emergency surgical service, and whether this service meets published standards for facilities and governance.

NHS leaders unveil action to boost flu vaccination and manage winter pressures

NHS England, Public Health England, the Department of Health and NHS Improvement have unveiled measures to boost the uptake of flu vaccinations along with a package of new contingency actions to respond to pressures on frontline services this winter. | NHS England

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Preparations include:

  • Providing free flu vaccines for hundreds of thousands of care home staff at a cost of up to £10m as well as increasing the number of jabs for young children
    in schools and vulnerable people
  • Directing NHS trusts to ensure they make vaccines readily available to staff and record why those who choose to opt out of the programme do so
  • Writing to doctors, nurses and other healthcare workers reminding them of their professional duty to protect patients by being vaccinated
  • Setting up a new National Emergency Pressure Panel to provide independent clinical advice on system risk and an appropriate regional and national response
  • The biggest expansion in training for A&E consultants ever with hundreds more doctors over the next four years and other healthcare staff

Full news story at NHS England

Earlier school start times may increase risk of adolescent depression and anxiety

Teenagers with school starting times before 8:30 a.m. may be at particular risk of experiencing depression and anxiety due to compromised sleep quality, according to a recent study. | Sleep Health 2017 | story via ScienceDaily

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The findings of this study provide additional evidence in the debate over how school start times impact adolescent health.  The study,  published in the journal Sleep Health found that Teenagers who start school before 8:30 a.m. are at higher risk of depression and anxiety, even if they’re doing everything else right to get a good night’s sleep.

The authors used an online tool to collect data from 197 students across the USA between the ages of 14 and 17. All children and parents completed a baseline survey that included questions about the child’s level of sleep hygiene, family socioeconomic status,  and their school start times. They were separated into two groups: those who started school before 8:30 a.m. and those who started after 8:30 a.m.

Over a period of seven days, the students were instructed to keep a sleep diary, in which they reported specifically on their daily sleep hygiene, levels of sleep quality and duration, and their depressive/anxiety symptoms.

The results showed that good baseline sleep hygiene was directly associated with lower average daily depressive/anxiety symptoms across all students, and the levels were even lower in students with school start times after 8:30. However, students with good baseline sleep hygiene and earlier school start times had higher average daily depressive/anxiety symptoms.

Link to the research:  Peltz, J. S. et al. A process-oriented model linking adolescents’ sleep hygiene and psychological functioning: the moderating role of school start times  Sleep Health

Full story at ScienceDaily