NICE approves breakthrough breast cancer drugs

NICE confirms that it will recommend that breakthrough cancer drugs palbociclib and ribociclib be provided on the NHS for women with advanced breast cancer| story via OnMedica

There are around 45,000 new diagnosis of breast cancer each year in England and it is estimated that around 8,000 of these people would be eligible for treatment with either palbociclib or ribociclib.

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In draft guidance, NICE said breast cancer patients should have routine access to these two life extending drugs after a new deal with their manufacturing companies who agreed to lower the price and who gave more evidence for their effectiveness.

Palbociclib (Ibrance) from Pfizer and ribociclib (Kisqali) from Norvatis, are recommended for people with hormone receptor (HR) positive, HER2 negative locally advanced or secondary breast cancer.

NICE said that although there were some uncertainties on how long they extend the life expectancy of people with this type of breast cancer, these promising new drugs were found to stall the growth of cancer for an extra 10 months on average.

Spending constraints associated with a higher than expected number of deaths

Study published in the British Medical Journal suggests cuts to public funding of health and social care since 2010 could be linked to almost 120,000 excess deaths in England | BMJ | OnMedica

The study reports that between 2010 and 2014, the NHS in England had a real-term annual increase in funding of 1.3%, despite rising patient demand and healthcare costs. Real-term spend on social care has fallen by 1.19% every year during the same period.

Researchers compared actual death rates for 2011 to 2014 with those that would be expected, based on trends before spending cuts came into play, and taking account of national and economic factors, such as unemployment rates and pensions.

The researchers’ analysis of the data showed that between 2001 and 2010, deaths in England fell by an average of 0.77% every year, but rose by an average of 0.87% every year between 2011 and 2014.

The spending restraints were associated with 45,368 higher than expected numbers of deaths between 2010 and 2014 compared with equivalent trends before 2010.

Full reference: Watkins J. et al. |  Effects of health and social care spending constraints on mortality in England: a time trend analysis | BMJ Open 2017

Related: Excess deaths could be linked to health spending cuts

Community mental health survey 2017

Latest survey from Care Quality Commission (CQC) looks at the experiences of people receiving community mental health services

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A survey of over 12,000 people who received care or treatment for a mental health condition found around two-thirds of respondents reported a positive experience of overall care.

The vast majority of respondents said that they knew how to contact the person in charge of their care if they had concerns. Higher proportion of respondents this year also knew who to contact out of hours if they were experiencing a crisis.

However, concerns remain about the quality of care some people experience when using community mental health services. There has been little notable improvement in survey results in the last year in the majority of areas.

The CQC believe the results suggest scope for further improvements in a number of areas including: crisis care, access and coordination of care, involvement in care, monitoring the effects of medication and receiving additional support.

Further detail via Care Quality Commission

Full analysis: 2017 Community Mental Health Survey Statistical release

Related:  CQC Report Finds ‘Major Issues’ Surrounding Access To Mental Health Care

Body dissatisfaction causing long lasting consequences for young people

Body dissatisfaction can start as young as six and lead to depression, anxiety and eating issues | Youth Select Committee

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The Youth Select Committee, a British Youth Council initiative, is supported by the House of Commons and has 11 members aged from 13 to 18. This week, the committee is launching its report, A Body Confident Future which looks at the issue of body image, an issue highlighted as an area of concern in a recent poll of thousands of young people.

The Committee’s key recommendations include:

  • Government sponsorship of an annual ‘National Body Confidence Week’ which would be supported by all relevant departments.
  • Introduction of minimum standards for social media companies in relation to content moderation, to be enforced in the forthcoming digital charter.
  • Measures to improve the diversity of advertising campaigns.
  • Adequate funding for schools so that pupils are supported in their wider wellbeing, including on issues related to body dissatisfaction.
  • Greater focus on body image in online resources aimed at young people, teachers and parents.

Full detail at British Youth Council

See also: BBC News: Young people out of love with their own bodies, says report

Funding of children and young people’s services

Turning the tide: reversing the move to late intervention spending in children and young people’s services. | The National Children’s Bureau | The Children’s Society |  Action for Children

This report looks at current funding and spending across children and young people’s services.  It finds councils no longer have the resources to fund early intervention services and suggests that this is likely to increase demand for more costly ‘late’ interventions.

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Image source: http://www.ncb.org.uk

The report looks at current funding and spend right across children and young people’s services, and  provides an estimate of how much councils are receiving for children and young people’s services and where this is being allocated.

Commissioning primary care services

NHS England has updated the Primary medical care policy and guidance manual to reflect the changing landscape in primary care co-commissioning.   This document provides commissioners of primary care services the context, information and tools to safely commission and contract manage primary medical care contracts.

The document is split into four sections:

Part A – Excellent Commissioning and Partnership Working

Part B – General Contract Management

Part C – When things go wrong

Part D – General

A&E waiting times: £360m needed to meet targets

Winter is coming. How much would it cost to keep the pressure down? | The Health Foundation | Story via OnMedica

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New analysis from the Health Foundation suggests that this winter could see the worst performance against the NHS four-hour A&E target since records began in 2004-5.

The analysis uses projected trends in A&E attendances, the number of people waiting over four hours at A&E, and the number of those needing admission but waiting over four hours for a bed. The projections suggest that around 735,000 people will wait longer than four hours in the last quarter of 2017-18 (January – March), equal to a 311% increase on winter 2010-11.

The NHS aims to admit, discharge, or transfer 95% of people within four hours of arriving at A&E. But in a worsening financial climate, hospitals are now struggling to meet this target all year round, not just in winter.

Full analysis: The Health Foundation:  Winter is coming. How much would it cost to keep the pressure down?

See also: OnMedica:  Millions needed to shore up NHS this winter, says think tank