Coaching/mentoring offer – for people representing patient voice in the NHS

NHS England | November 2018 | Current Opportunities to get involved

NHS England has developed a coaching/mentoring development opportunity for Patient and Public Voice partners (PPVs). They are offering places to PPVs who are currently volunteering with NHS England (they anticipate that applicants would have been volunteering for at least six months representing patient voice); or are supporting transformation programmes in Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships (STPs) or Integrated Care Systems (ICS) on a regular basis. The coaching would be provided by accredited employee coaches who also coach and mentor NHS England employees (Source: NHS England). 

For the full details see NHS England 

 

New resource launched to improve dementia care

People living with dementia will benefit from improved care following the launch of a new resource for healthcare providers and carers | Health Education England

Success in dementia
Image source:hee.nhs.uk

Managing Success in Dementia is a resource commissioned by Health Education England (HEE) and developed by Skills for Care, Skills for Health and Leeds Beckett University to support leaders and managers working across health and social care to implement the training outcomes of the Dementia Training Standards Framework – in particular those responsible for implementing training at Tier 2 level.

Tier 2 training provides additional skills and knowledge for people who regularly work directly with people living with dementia.

Full document: Managing success in dementia care: A support resource for implementing Tier 2 of the Dementia Training Standards Framework in health and social care settings

Children of the millennium

Children of the millennium: understanding the course of conduct problems during childhood | The Centre for Health Economics | University College London Institute of Education  

millenium
Image source: http://www.centreformentalhealth.org.uk

This report presents an analysis of the Millennium Cohort Study which follows the lives of children born in 2000 and 2001.  The report finds that one child in every twelve in the UK has behavioural problems from a young age into their teenage years and calls for the government, NHS, schools and local authorities to do more to support children with persistent behavioural problems.

Children with persistent problems are much more likely to have a multitude of risks early in life, including poverty and housing insecurity, parental mental illness and developmental delay.

 

The report calls for:

  • Government to seek to reduce child poverty and housing insecurity
  • The NHS to continue to boost mental health support to new parents
  • Local authorities to get the funding they need to boost early years services such as Sure Start and to offer evidence-based parenting programmes to families with the greatest needs.

Full document: Children of the millenium: Understanding the course of conduct problems during childhood | Centre for Mental Health

Additional link: Centre for Mental Health press release

Increasing continuity of care in General Practice

The Health Foundation is supporting five large-scale GP practices and federations to carry out targeted improvement work to increase continuity of care in their practices.

The Increasing Continuity of Care in General Practice programme will explore what continuity of care will look like, considering relationships between GPs and patients, and also examining whether better information and management practices can help increase continuity with the aim of bringing benefits to both staff and patients.

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This programme is inspired by recent Health Foundation research which demonstrated that patients with ambulatory care sensitive conditions who see the same GP a greater proportion of the time have fewer unplanned hospital admissions. The programme has been developed with the advice and support of the Royal College of General Practitioners.

Each project will run for up to two years and each project team will receive up to £250,000 of funding to support the implementation, evaluation and dissemination of findings from their work.

Full story at The Health Foundation

Are we failing people with learning disabilities? A fair, supportive society: summary report

University College London | November 2018 |Are we failing people with learning disabilities?

A new report published by UCL’s Institute of Health Equity (IHE) highlights that  40 per cent of children with a learning disability remain undiagnosed and that adults with learning disabilities will die 15-20 years earlier (on average) than the general population which is 1,200 premature deaths each year.

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Responding to the findings Sir Michael Marmot , director of IHE said:

“This is a direct result of a political choice that destines this vulnerable group to experience some of the worst of what society has to offer: low incomes, no work, poor housing, social isolation and loneliness, bullying and abuse.

“A staggering 40% of people with learning difficulties aren’t even diagnosed in childhood. This is an avoidable sign of a society failing to be fair and supportive to its most vulnerable members. We need to change this. The time to act is now.”

The IHE makes a number of actions and 11 recommendations to improve life expectancy for people with disabilities.  (Source: UCL)

Read the IHE paper 

Easy read version 
In the media:

Guardian Two in five people with learning disabilities not diagnosed in childhood

Study finds North-south divide in early deaths deepening

University of Liverpool| November 2018 | Study finds North-south divide in early deaths deepening

Data analysed as part of new research into the excess mortality and socioeconomic deprivation  reveals a profoundly concerning gap in mortality between the North and the South, especially in men.  The researchers involved from Keele, Liverpool, Manchester and York universities, looked into mortality rates in 5 most northerly government regions (Yorkshire and Humber, North East, North West, East Midlands West Midlands) and 5 most southerly government regions ((East of England, South Central, South West, South East, and London).  Using data from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) they aggregated and compared the northern and southern regions between the years 1981 and 2016. 

 

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The study found that:

• Accounting for age and sex, northerners aged 25-44 were 47% more likely to die from cardiovascular reasons, 109% more likely to die from alcohol misuse and 60% more likely from drug misuse, compared to southerners.

• London had the lowest mortality rates, with the North East having the highest, even after adjusting for age, sex and socio-economic deprivation.

• Suicide among men, especially at ages 30-34, and cancer deaths among women were also important factors.

• National cardiovascular death rates declined over the study period, though the North – South gap persists.

The study also revealed that, although there was little difference between early deaths in the North and the South in the 1990s, by 2016 a gap had opened up nonetheless.

(Source: University of Liverpool)

The study has now been published in the Lancet Health 

Abstract

Background

Since the mid-1990s, excess mortality has increased markedly for adults aged 25–44 years in the north compared with the south of England. We examined the underlying causes of this excess mortality and the contribution of socioeconomic deprivation.

Methods

Mortality data from the Office of National Statistics for adults aged 25–44 years were aggregated and compared between England’s five most northern versus five most southern government office regions between Jan 1, 1981, and Dec 31, 2016. Poisson regression models, adjusted for age and sex, were used to quantify excess mortality in the north compared with the south by underlying cause of death (accidents, alcohol related, cardiovascular disease and diabetes, drug related, suicide, cancer, and other causes). The role of socioeconomic deprivation, as measured by the 2015 Index of Multiple Deprivation, in explaining the excess and regional variability was also explored.

Findings

A mortality divide between the north and south appeared in the mid-1990s and rapidly expanded thereafter for deaths attributed to accidents, alcohol misuse, and drug misuse. In the 2014–16 period, the northern excess was incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1·47 for cardiovascular reasons, 2·09 for alcohol misuse, and 1·60 for drug misuse, across both men and women aged 25–44 years. National mortality rates for cardiovascular deaths declined over the study period but a longstanding gap between north and south persisted in 2016 in the north vs from 23·5 to 9·9 in the south. Between 2014 and 2016, estimated excess numbers of death in the north versus the south for those aged 25–44 years were 1881 for women and 3530 for men. Socioeconomic deprivation explained up to two-thirds of the excess mortality in the north. By 2016, in addition to the persistent north–south gap, mortality rates in London were lower than in all other regions, with IRRs ranging from IRR 1·13 for the East England to 1·22  for the North East, even after adjusting for deprivation.

Interpretation

Sharp relative rises in deaths from cardiovascular reasons, alcohol misuse and drug misuse in the north compared with the south seem to have created new health divisions between England’s regions. This gap might be due to exacerbation of existing social and health inequalities that have been experienced for many years. These divisions might suggest increasing psychological distress, despair, and risk taking among young and middle-aged adults, particularly outside of London.
Full reference: Kontopantelis, E., Buchan, I., Webb, R. T., Ashcroft, D. M., Mamas, M. A., & Doran, T. |2018| Disparities in mortality among 25–44-year-olds in England: a longitudinal, population-based study| The Lancet Public Health|DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/S2468-2667(18)30177-4

 

 

Outpatients app ‘saving NHS millions’

NHS Confederation | November 2018 |Outpatients app ‘saving NHS millions’

A new app- the MyCare app- developed by Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, the app allows patients to change and confirm appointments on a smartphone, tablet or computer, with outpatient letters emailed in real time.  The app has been co-designed by patients and clinicians.  

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Chief executive of the trust Joe Harrison explains, “for most hospitals in the country, it is easier for somebody to book a hotel, flight and a cab to pick them up from Sydney, Australia than it is for them to change or cancel their outpatient appointment – because we don’t allow people to do it in their own time, on any device, in a way that is convenient to them.”

While many trusts are providing patient portals, Milton Keynes is the first NHS hospital to provide the ability for people to directly manage their appointments, including rearranging them solely online without needing to call the hospital (Source: NHS Confederation).

MyCare at  Milton Keynes University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust