Socioeconomic inequalities in avoidable mortality in England and Wales: 2001 to 2017

Office for National Statistics | May 2019 | Socioeconomic inequalities in avoidable mortality in England and Wales: 2001 to 2017
The latest analysis of the impact of socioeconomic inequalities in avoidable mortality in the period during 2001 to 2017 shows that males and females from the most deprived areas in England and Wales were up to four times more likely to die from an avoidable death than those in the least deprived areas in 2017.  The Office for National Statistics has published Socioeconomic inequalities in avoidable mortality in England and Wales: 2001 to 2017, which presents figures for avoidable mortality in 2001 to 2017 for England and Wales using measures of multiple deprivation to measure socioeconomic inequalities.

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Commenting on the figures, Professor Dame Parveen Kumar, British Medical Association board of science chair said: “These latest figures…show that socioeconomic conditions continue to disproportionately impact on the health of people living in deprived areas.

“The decline in the rate of improvement in avoidable mortality is a particular cause for concern: 16% of male avoidable deaths in England 2017 occurred in those living in the most deprived areas, compared with 6% for those living in the least deprived areas.”

She continued: “The cost of this inequality is substantial, both in years of life lost and in costs to the economy and wider society. Clearly, more must be done to reverse this decline (via OnMedica).

  • In England, in 2017, 16% of male avoidable deaths were experienced by those living in the most deprived areas, compared with 6% in the least deprived areas; for females it was 14% and 7% respectively.
  • In Wales, in 2017, 13% of male avoidable deaths were experienced by those living in the most deprived areas, compared with 5% in the least deprived areas; for females it was 13% and 6% respectively.
  • In 2017, the absolute inequality in the rate of avoidable death between the most and least deprived areas; in Wales was 368.4 deaths per 100,000 males and 229.9 deaths per 100,000 females; in England, the rates were 358.3 and 205.5 respectively.
  • In 2017, males and females living in the most deprived areas in England were 4.5 and 3.9 times more likely to die from an avoidable cause than those living in the least deprived areas respectively.
  • In Wales, in 2017, males and females living in the most deprived areas were 3.7 and 3.8 times more likely to die from an avoidable cause than those living in the least deprived areas respectively.
  • The absolute difference in the rate of avoidable death caused by cardiovascular diseases between the most and least deprived areas narrowed between 2001 and 2017, but has widened for injuries in both England and Wales.
  • Between 2011 and 2017, avoidable deaths caused by injuries in the most deprived areas in England statistically significantly increased by 16% among females and 17% among males.
  • In England and Wales, there were greater annual improvements in avoidable mortality rates between 2001 and 2010 compared with 2011 and 2017; this was particularly noticeable among males living in the most deprived areas.
  • See also:

Read the full piece from OnMedica  Avoidable death four times as likely among the poor as among the well off

ONS report  Socioeconomic inequalities in avoidable mortality in England and Wales: 2001 to 2017

Misuse of illicit drugs and medicines

Misuse of illicit drugs and medicines: applying All Our Health | Public Health England

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Estimates show that around 1 in 10 adults (16 to 59 years old) have used an illicit drug in the last year, with 1 in 3 using at some point during their lifetime. Fortunately, the number of people with serious drug problems is small, although these problems can have a big impact on individuals, their families and the wider community.

This guide is part of ‘All Our Health’ framework, a resource which helps health professionals prevent ill health and promote wellbeing as part of their everyday practice. The information will help front-line health and care staff use their trusted relationships with patients, families and communities to promote the benefits of asking patients about drug use.

Full detail at Public Health England

Spare change: the public and NHS funding

Is the NHS adequately funded, and how should funding be raised? Harry Evans explores the findings of the British Social Attitudes survey on public attitudes towards NHS funding and taxation | The Kings Fund

This article examines the following questions:

  • Has concern about NHS funding fallen?
  • Have attitudes towards NHS taxes changed?
  • What are the public’s views about alternative funding measures?
  • Are people more positive or more optimistic?

Full article at The Kings Fund

Related: Public satisfaction with the NHS and social care in 2018: Results from the British Social Attitudes survey

How men experience and combat loneliness and social isolation in later life

Older Men at the Margins: how men experience and combat loneliness and social isolation in later life | Age UK

Older men at the margins was a two-year study to understand how men aged 65 and over from different social backgrounds and circumstances experienced loneliness and social isolation. It also explored the formal and informal ways they sought to stay connected with others and feel less lonely. This guidance sets out the learning from the research and highlights factors to be considered to meet the diverse needs of older men through group programmes and interventions.

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Image source: http://www.ageuk.org.uk

The guidance includes the following sections:

Full detail at age UK

Additional resources:

Have cuts to public spending on social care for older people led to more emergency hospital admissions?

The Strategy Unit | May 2019 | Have cuts to public spending on social care for older people led to more emergency hospital admissions?

New research conducted by The Strategy Unit investigated the extent to which reductions in social care spend on older people, following the 2008 financial crisis, led to increases in emergency hospital admissions. 

The researchers found no evidence to support the view that reductions in government spend on social care since 2008 have led to increases in emergency hospital admissions in older people.

The Strategy Unit Have cuts to public spending on social care for older people led to more emergency hospital admissions?

 

 

Developing an organisation-wide approach to improvement

The Improvement Journey. Why organisation-wide improvement in health care matters, and how to get started | The Health Foundation

This new report from The Health Foundation is a practical guide to developing an organisation-wide approach to improvement. It shows why this approach is critical to becoming a high performing organisation and delivering the NHS Long Term Plan.

Drawing on learning and insights from the Health Foundation’s work in quality improvement and beyond, the report shows how a sustained approach requires corporate leadership and investment in infrastructure, staff capability and culture over the long-term.

Key points

  • Building an organisation-wide approach to improvement is a journey that can take several years.
  • An essential early step is securing the support and commitment of the board for a long-term programme, including their willingness to finance the skills and infrastructure development needed to implement it.
  • The report includes case studies of three English NHS trusts with an outstanding CQC rating that have implemented an organisational approach to improvement.

Full report available at The Health Foundation

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Image source: http://www.health.org.uk

BMA Report: Exposing a hidden crisis in the NHS this winter

BMA | May 2019 | Exposing a hidden crisis in the NHS this winter

The BMA’s latest report- Exposing a hidden crisis in the NHS this winter– highlights how winter pressure reoccurred in the NHS. 

The 2018/19 winter saw the NHS once again under intense pressure, with A&E attendances and emergency admissions up, dangerously high bed occupancy, cancer waiting times growing and 4.3 million people now waiting for treatment. Many doctors worked extra hours and morale suffered.close-up-doctor-health-42273

Despite huge winter pressures reoccurring, there has been noticeably less attention and public debate on this issue compared to last year. Nevertheless, in several key respects, this could be described as the worst winter on record for the NHS. This winter’s NHS pressures are a hidden crisis.

Headline Statistics
  • Almost 1 in 4 waited over 4 hours at major A&Es
  • 214,000 patients left waiting over 4 hours on trolleys
  • 292 A&E diverts across 32 trusts (of 134)
  • 24% of cancer patients had to wait over 2 months for their first treatment
  • Almost a third of NHS Trusts hit 100% bed occupancy at some point over the winter
  • The waiting list for treatment rose to over 4.3 million people
  • 2.23 million GP appointments involved a wait over 28 days
  • Most doctors work outside their regular hours and 4 in 10 NHS staff report feeling unwell as a result of work stress
  • Zero parliamentary debates on the NHS winter crisis (Source: BMA)

Full details from the BMA