Coronavirus Information Service on WhatsApp

Cabinet Office, Department of Health and Social Care, and Public Health England | March 2020 | Coronavirus Information Service on WhatsApp

The UK Government has launched a GOV.UK Coronavirus Information service on WhatsApp.

The new free to use service aims to provide official, trustworthy and timely information and advice about coronavirus (COVID-19), and will further reduce the burden on NHS services.

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This will help combat the spread of coronavirus misinformation in the UK, as well as helping ensure people stay home, protect the NHS and save lives.

The GOV.UK Coronavirus Information Service is an automated ‘chatbot’ service which will allow the British public to get answers to the most common questions about coronavirus direct from government.

The service will provide information on topics such as coronavirus prevention and symptoms, the latest number of cases in the UK, advice on staying at home, travel advice and myth busting (Source: Cabinet OfficeDepartment of Health and Social Care, and Public Health England)

When to use a surgical face mask or FFP3 respirator

Public Health England | March 2020 | When to use a surgical face mask or FFP3 respirator

When to use a surgical face mask or FFP3 respirator

 

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/874411/When_to_use_face_mask_or_FFP3.pdf

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/874411/When_to_use_face_mask_or_FFP3.pdf

Coronavirus (COVID-19): guidance on vulnerable children and young people Questions and answers about the provisions being made for vulnerable children and young people.

Public Health England | March 2020 | Coronavirus (COVID-19): guidance on vulnerable children and young people

New guidance from Public Health England (PHE) covers questions and answers about the provisions being made for vulnerable children and young people.

Coronavirus (COVID-19): guidance on vulnerable children and young people

More steps may lower risk of early death

Charles E. et al. (2020) .Association of Daily Step Count and Step Intensity With Mortality Among US Adults. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 38. 7. P.686-697.

A new, US study used the following research question: What are the associations between daily step counts and step intensity with mortality among US adults? 

The observational study of over 4000 participants, demonstrated a  greater number of steps per day was significantly associated with lower all-cause mortality. There was no significant association between step intensity and all-cause mortality after adjusting for the total number of steps per day.

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Abstract

Importance  It is unclear whether the number of steps per day and the intensity of stepping are associated with lower mortality.

Objective  Describe the dose-response relationship between step count and intensity and mortality.

Design, Setting, and Participants  Representative sample of US adults aged at least 40 years in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey who wore an accelerometer for up to 7 days ( from 2003-2006). Mortality was ascertained through December 2015.

Exposures  Accelerometer-measured number of steps per day and 3 step intensity measures (extended bout cadence, peak 30-minute cadence, and peak 1-minute cadence [steps/min]). Accelerometer data were based on measurements obtained during a 7-day period at baseline.

Main Outcomes and Measures  The primary outcome was all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes were cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer mortality. Hazard ratios (HRs), mortality rates, and 95% CIs were estimated using cubic splines and quartile classifications adjusting for age; sex; race/ethnicity; education; diet; smoking status; body mass index; self-reported health; mobility limitations; and diagnoses of diabetes, stroke, heart disease, heart failure, cancer, chronic bronchitis, and emphysema.

Results  A total of 4840 participants (mean age, 56.8 years; 2435 [54%] women; 1732 [36%] individuals with obesity) wore accelerometers for a mean of 5.7 days for a mean of 14.4 hours per day. The mean number of steps per day was 9124. There were 1165 deaths over a mean 10.1 years of follow-up, including 406 CVD and 283 cancer deaths. The unadjusted incidence density for all-cause mortality was 76.7 per 1000 person-years (419 deaths) for the 655 individuals who took less than 4000 steps per day; 21.4 per 1000 person-years (488 deaths) for the 1727 individuals who took 4000 to 7999 steps per day; 6.9 per 1000 person-years (176 deaths) for the 1539 individuals who took 8000 to 11 999 steps per day; and 4.8 per 1000 person-years (82 deaths) for the 919 individuals who took at least 12 000 steps per day. Compared with taking 4000 steps per day, taking 8000 steps per day was associated with significantly lower all-cause mortality (HR, 0.49 [95% CI, 0.44-0.55]), as was taking 12 000 steps per day (HR, 0.35 [95% CI, 0.28-0.45]). Unadjusted incidence density for all-cause mortality by peak 30 cadence was 32.9 per 1000 person-years (406 deaths) for the 1080 individuals who took 18.5 to 56.0 steps per minute; 12.6 per 1000 person-years (207 deaths) for the 1153 individuals who took 56.1 to 69.2 steps per minute; 6.8 per 1000 person-years (124 deaths) for the 1074 individuals who took 69.3 to 82.8 steps per minute; and 5.3 per 1000 person-years (108 deaths) for the 1037 individuals who took 82.9 to 149.5 steps per minute. Greater step intensity was not significantly associated with lower mortality after adjustment for total steps per day (eg, highest vs lowest quartile of peak 30 cadence: HR, 0.90 [95% CI, 0.65-1.27]; P value for trend = .34).

Conclusions and Relevance  Based on a representative sample of US adults, a greater number of daily steps was significantly associated with lower all-cause mortality. There was no significant association between step intensity and mortality after adjusting for total steps per day.

 

JAMA  Association of Daily Step Count and Step Intensity With Mortality Among US Adults

The Guardian Higher step counts could lower risk of early death, study finds

Changing behaviour in families: techniques for healthy weight services to support families with children aged 4 to 11 years

Public Health England | March 2020 | Changing behaviour in families: techniques for healthy weight services to support families with children aged 4 to 11 years

Public Health England has released a document of  evidence-based behaviour change techniques recommended for healthy weight services to support families with children aged 4 to 11 years

Changing behaviour in families: techniques for healthy weight services to support families with children aged 4 to 11 years

Social Stigma associated with COVID-19: A guide to preventing and addressing social stigma.

World Health Organization | March 2020 | Social Stigma associated with COVID-19: A guide to preventing and addressing social stigma 

The current COVID-19 outbreak has provoked social stigma and discriminatory
behaviours against people of certain ethnic backgrounds as well as anyone
perceived to have been in contact with the virus. The WHO has produced a guide to address social stigma. (Source: WHO).

A guide to preventing and addressing social stigma