Emotional wellbeing of young people

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Public Health England has carried out a thematic analysis of the recent Health Behaviour in School Age Children (HSBC) survey exploring the rising trend in poorer emotional wellbeing of young people.

The reports cover self-harm; cyberbullying and the emotional wellbeing of adolescent girls.  They examine the data and explore what protective factors may exist in a young person’s life which may be linked to their mental health outcomes, ranging from personal attributes, family, school, peer and wider community context.

Public Health England has also produced a summary of data from the most recent HBSC survey.

Te reports can be downloaded below:

Reducing baby deaths and injuries

Teamwork in maternity units key to reducing baby deaths and brain injuries during childbirth. Adherence to best practice on fetal monitoring and neonatal care also identified as crucial to improving outcomes

The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists has published Each Baby Counts: 2015 Summary Report. The report provides a detailed analysis of all stillbirths, neonatal deaths and brain injuries that occurred during childbirth in 2015 and identifies the key clinical actions needed to improve the quality of care and prevent future cases. These clinical actions include: improving fetal monitoring; enhancing neonatal care; and reducing human factors by understanding ‘situational awareness’ to ensure the safe management of complex clinical decisions.

The full report can be downloaded here

Adult weight management

Public Health England has published guidance to support the commissioning and delivery of tier 2 adult weight management services.

This guidance supports commissioners and providers of tier 2 adult weight management services, including:

  • local authorities (LAs)
  • clinical commissioning groups (CCGs)
  • NHS institutions

The guidance is published under the following categories: following categories:

Commission and provide

Adult weight management services: commission and provide

Weight management services: insights into user experiences

Interventions

Data collection

Treatments and technologies matter, but patients most want to be seen as people

Patient stories are a raw and compelling new kind of online feedback. They can prompt rapid improvements in services – if the NHS is willing to embrace them | The Guardian Healthcare Network

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People have always shared their experiences of healthcare, usually privately, with family, neighbours or workmates. But online, patients and carers are increasingly willing to share accounts of their health service encounters with the wider world, often in intimate detail. There are websites devoted to collecting and publicising patient ratings and reviews of healthcare professionals, services, diagnoses and treatments.

The stories of patients and carers are becoming an unavoidable part of modern healthcare. In the US, people searching online for information about local services are more likely to read patient comments than official clinical outcome measures or patient experience metrics. In the UK, staff routinely read online patient feedback and share it on social media. NHS regulators have even started to think in terms of monitoring and analysing patient stories to provide an “early warning” for when things might be going wrong.

Read the full news story here

The social barriers to an active society are being ignored

The simplicity of exhorting people to “be more active” belies how complicated it can be to put this into practice. Increasing physical activity requires individuals to do things differently | The Conversation

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Can individuals alone make the changes that are required? Public health campaigns imply that they can, focusing on how to live a healthier, more active life. But do the roots of inactivity really lie only in the behaviour, decisions and motivations of individuals? Or are there wider factors which need to be recognised and addressed?

Plenty of evidence suggests that external influences are also important, and there is mileage in ensuring that these elements are integrated into addressing individual behaviour.

Consider, for example, the challenge of raising physical activity levels among older people. This is a priority for public health given the predicted 89.3% increase in the numbers of older adults to 9.9m in the UK by 2039. According to Sport England, 54% of those aged 75 and above are doing less than 30 minutes of physical activity a week.

Full blog post here

Women and leadership – (still) more to do

Despite the advances of recent years, two recent reports, Women in finance and Women on boards: 50:50 by 2020, once again draw attention to the problems women still face in obtaining senior leadership positions within the NHS and outside it | The King’s Fund

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Women in finance is about fairness, equality and inclusion for women and men. It is predicated on a desire for gender parity and a balanced workforce because, as the evidence makes clear, this improves culture, behaviour, outcomes, profitability and productivity. However, the current situation in the financial services sector is quite different; more women than men start out in financial services but many women fail to move up the management scale. This leaves almost all the top jobs in the hands of men. The main reason for this, it appears, is organisational culture.

One study conducted in 2016 across a wide range of employment sectors found that unsupportive workplace cultures still present the most significant barrier to career progress for women. Amazingly this was the case for female respondents in the 20-29 age group as well as for older respondents. Gender inequality and discrimination were reported, as were difficult colleagues and managers, bullying, undervalued work, and women feeling that they have to over-perform simply because they are female. Recommendations following this study included building closer relationships between men and women in the workplace, and the provision of opportunities to discuss gender issues experienced within the organisational culture.

Jeremy Hunt outlines new government’s NHS priorities at #Confed17

After being introduced by Niall Dickson as ‘something of a survivor,’ Jeremy Hunt took to the stage on day two of Confed17 to give his thanks and praise to the NHS, its staff and its leaders, and to set out some of the new government’s priorities for the NHS | NHS Confederation

Thanking NHS leaders for ‘stepping up to the plate’ in what he described as one of the most difficult jobs in the world, Mr Hunt went on to thank NHS staff and stated that the support and welfare of staff is a central government priority. Other immediate priorities he highlighted are:

  • The status of EU nationals in health and care system.
  • Staff retention levels
  • Mental health support
  • Workforce shortages and gaps

Looking ahead for the next 12 months, the government’s priorities include:

  • Continuing progress to turn around performance
  • Achieving financial balance
  • Continued focus on transforming mental health
  • Continued focus on safety improvements

Read the full overview here