Impact of inadequate health literacy on patient satisfaction, healthcare utilization, and expenditures

Inadequate health literacy (HL) is associated with impaired healthcare choices leading to poor quality-of-care | Geriatric Nursing

stethoscope-562567_960_720

Our primary purpose was to estimate the prevalence of inadequate HL among two populations of AARP®Medicare Supplement insureds: sicker and healthier populations; to identify characteristics of inadequate HL; and to describe the impact on patient satisfaction, preventive services, healthcare utilization, and expenditures. Surveys were mailed to insureds in 10 states. Multivariate regression models were used to identify characteristics and adjust outcomes. Among respondents (N = 7334), 23% and 16% of sicker and healthier insureds, respectively, indicated inadequate HL. Characteristics of inadequate HL included male gender, older age, more comorbidities, and lower education. Inadequate HL was associated with lower patient satisfaction, lower preventive service compliance, higher healthcare utilization and expenditures. Inadequate HL is more common among older adults in poorer health, further compromising their health outcomes; thus they may benefit from expanded educational or additional care coordination interventions.

Full reference: MacLeod, S. et al. (2017) The impact of inadequate health literacy on patient satisfaction, healthcare utilization, and expenditures among older adults. Geriatric Nursing. Volume 38 (Issue 4) pp. 334–341

A journey to improved staff engagement – in our shoes

NHS Employers, August 2017

Imperial-college

Source: NHS Employers

 

This case study looks at how Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust has significantly improved their staff engagement levels using new and innovative methods. Through engaging with staff to understand more about how they are feeling at work, engagement levels have improved from the 2015 score of 3.71 to 3.8 in 2016, which was the largest year-on-year increase of all acute trusts in London.

 

 

 

 

Improving new starter turnover: case study

NHS Employers

East-Kent-Starter-Turnover

Source: NHS Employers

This case study outlines how East Kent Hospitals University NHS Foundation Trust worked to improve experiences of staff in their first year of employment at the trust. The trust improved the overall on-boarding experience including starting induction before day one in the role and introducing an online portal for new starters, along with the benefits and the challenges of doing so. This work has resulted in an improvement in new starter turnover of nearly 20 per cent.

Implementation guide and resource pack for dementia care

NHS England has published a new dementia guide that sets out what good quality assessment, diagnosis and care looks like in relation to formal guidance, in addition to the views and expectations of people living with dementia and their carers.

The guide is shaped by the framework set by the NHS Mandate and has two clear requirements to enhance dementia care, through:

increasing the number of people being diagnosed with dementia, and starting treatment, within six weeks from referral; and
improving the quality of post-diagnostic treatment and support for people with dementia and their carers.
This guide is support by:

Good care planning guide for dementia
RightCare dementia pathway scenario

Stepping forward to 2020/21: the mental health workforce plan for England

Health Education England, July 2017

This plan sets out measures to expand the mental health workforce in England and fulfil ambitions to improve mental health services. By 2020 to 2021 local areas will need to create 21,000 new posts in priority growth areas to deliver the improvements in services and support set out in the Five year forward view for mental health.

NICE recommends GPs develop a national autism register

GPs could be asked to develop a national autism register to help end the ‘invisibility’ of autistic people in the health system | GP Online

screen-1839500_1280

NICE has recommended the register be implemented with a new QOF indicator.

The proposal follows the findings of the Westminster Commission on Autism, set up by the National Children’s Group and chaired by Labour MP Barry Sheerman. Its report found that 76% of autistic people and parents said their GP did not make any reasonable adjustments for them or their autistic child. The report said this was an indication that health professionals may not consistently identify and make accommodations for the needs of autistic people.

NICE said a register would make autistic patients more easily identifiable to healthcare professionals in GP practices and help staff adapt their approach to suit patients’ needs.

For example, NICE said, it would allow staff to arrange for autistic children to come for vaccinations at quieter times and turn lights down for those with sensory problems.

Read the full news story here