New report shows more young people surviving cancer

Teenage Cancer Trust | January 2019 | New report shows more young people surviving cancer

A new report from Teenager Cancer Trust uses data collected by NCRAS  (National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service) which has been analysed to identify trends and share finding with partners to improve cancer services and awareness.  Now Teenage Cancer Trust report 13-24 years old who were diagnosed in England up to the end of 2015. The publication marks the first time a detailed analysis has been conducted of cancer rates of the 13 to 24-year age group and shows an encouraging increase in survival rates.

Some of the report’s key findings:

  • Mortality rates of all cancers combined in 13 to 24 year olds have decreased from 42.9 per million in 2001 to 32.3 per million in 2015.
  • The largest reduction in mortality by diagnostic group in England between 2001 and 2015 has been in Leukaemias. There were also reductions seen in mortality from Central Nervous System tumours, bone cancer and in lymphoma.
  • Five-year survival rates for cancer in 13 to 24 year olds have risen from 83% females / 80% males in (2001-05) to 87% in females / 84 % males (2007-11).
  • There are statistically significant variations in incidence and survival rates of cancer in 13 to 24 year olds based on geography and deprivation.
  • The incidence of cancer in 13 to 24 years olds in England has increased from a crude rate of 233.1 per million in 2001, to 299.7 per million in 2015 (Source: Teenage Cancer Trust).

News release Teenage Cancer Trust  New report shows more young people surviving cancer

The report is available to read and download from Teenage Cancer Trust 

BMJ Cancer: more young people in England are surviving

In the news: BBC News Teenage cancer survival ‘on the up’ in England, report finds

High-fibre diet cuts risk of death from cancer, stroke and heart disease by up to a third

Observational studies and clinical trials conducted over nearly 40 years reveal the health benefits of eating at least 25g to 29g or more of dietary fibre a day, according to a series of systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in The Lancet | via ScienceDaily

Eating more fibre, found in wholegrain cereals, pasta and bread as well as nuts and pulses, will reduce people’s chances of heart disease and early death, according to a landmark review published in The Lancet. The study was commissioned by the World Health Organization to inform the development of new recommendations for optimal daily fibre intake and to determine which types of carbohydrate provide the best protection against non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and weight gain.

The results suggest a 15-30% decrease in all-cause and cardiovascular related mortality when comparing people who eat the highest amount of fibre to those who eat the least. Eating fibre-rich foods also reduced incidence of coronary heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and colorectal cancer by 16-24%. Per 1,000 participants, the impact translates into 13 fewer deaths and six fewer cases of coronary heart disease.

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In addition, a meta-analysis of clinical trials suggested that increasing fibre intakes was associated with lower bodyweight and cholesterol, compared with lower intakes.

While their study did not show any risks associated with dietary fibre, the authors note that high intakes might have ill-effects for people with low iron or mineral levels, for whom high levels of whole grains can further reduce iron levels. They also note that the study mainly relates to naturally-occurring fibre rich foods rather than synthetic and extracted fibre, such as powders, that can be added to foods.

Full story at ScienceDaily

Link to the research: Reynolds, A. et al. | Carbohydrate quality and human health: a series of systematic reviews and meta-analyses | The Lancet | Published January 10, 2019

Related:

National Bowel Cancer Audit

Health Quality Improvement Programme | December 2018 | Bowel Cancer Audit

The latest annual National Bowel Cancer Audit from the Health Quality Improvement Programme (HQIP) details data from over 30,000 patients diagnosed with bowel cancer between 01 April 2016 and 31 March 2017.

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Image source: hqip.org.uk

This  audit report describes some ongoing improvements such as mortality rates following both elective and emergency surgery falling over the past five years and increased numbers of operations being performed laparoscopically.

This year’s report has also described geographical variation in chemotherapy administration and further work is required to better describe and understand this. It is encouraging to see that there has been a reducing trend of deaths in hospital from 2011 to 2016 (46.2% – 34.6%) (Source: HQIP) .

2018 Annual Report 

Patient Report 2018 

Patients in Yorkshire set to benefit from revolutionary medical imaging due to University of Sheffield fundraising campaign

University of Sheffield | December 2018 | Patients in Yorkshire set to benefit from revolutionary medical imaging thanks to £2 million fundraising appeal

A campaign launched by the University of Sheffield in 2017 has raised £2million to make possible a revolutionary scanner in Yorkshire.  During the last 18 months, staff, current  students, alumni and members of the public and local business community, and friends of the University have supported the Sheffield Scanner campaign.

The high-tech scanner will provide unprecedented views of inside the human body by combining the power of both MRI and PET images in a single scan. It will help leading scientists and medics tackle some of the most devastating diseases facing millions of people including dementia, cancer, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s and motor neurone disease (MND).

The facility will also bring more clinical trials to the region, giving patients in Yorkshire access to ground-breaking new innovative treatments that are being developed. The scanner will be the only MRI-PET scanner in Yorkshire, the new Sheffield Scanner Facility will be attached to the Royal Hallamshire Hospital.

Dame Pam Shaw, Vice-President and Head of the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health at the University of Sheffield, and Director of the Sheffield NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience, said:

“The combination of these two imaging techniques – MRI and PET – in one machine will let us detect extremely small abnormalities very accurately. We are hoping, and expecting, this will allow us to diagnose medical conditions much earlier. We will also be able to monitor how new innovative treatments are working much more nimbly than we have in the past.

Professor Koen Lamberts, President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Sheffield, said: “The success of this fundraising campaign is a fantastic achievement and marks the beginning of an exciting journey for the University, the Sheffield city region and beyond. I am extremely proud that Sheffield will now be home to one of only eight MRI-PET scanners in the UK.”

(Source: University of Sheffield)

All.Can patient survey

All.Can UK | December 2018| First findings of All.Can patient survey revealed at UK Parliament event

More than a third (36 per cent) of cancer patients reported the greatest inefficiency as being their diagnosis finds the All. Can patient survey sought patients’ and carers’ perspectives on inefficiencies in cancer care.  40 per cent of people who participated in the survey had been initially diagnosed with something else. A similar proportion (34 per cent) also responded to say that they had a surplus of medication left over following treatment.

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All.Can worked with Quality Health to develop the patient survey. Quality Health was responsible for all aspects of survey administration and data analysis, with input from All.Can national initiatives and the international research and evidence working group.

The UK piloted the All.Can patient survey ahead of roll-out in other countries throughout 2018. The survey closed in the UK in August, but continued running until 30 November in Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Italy, Poland, Spain and Sweden.  Data from an international version is also being analysed (Source: all-can.org).

Further details from All.Can

Bowel cancer waiting times figures revealed

University of Edinburgh | November 2018 |Bowel cancer waiting times figures revealed

Bowel cancer is the fourth most common cancer type, now researchers from the University of Edinburgh have shown that it takes 10% of  patients in England and Wales more than a year from recognising the symptoms to receiving treatment for their bowel cancer. They found that 10% of people with bowel cancer in Scotland waited more than 8 months to start treatment. 

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This international study included anonymised medical data from 3000 patients and their doctors in Australia, and Canada alongside the UK. Among their findings people in Wales took the longest to contact their GP once they had a health concern. Patients in Wales also waited the longest time (168 days)  to commence treatment,  which contrasts with Denmark (77 days. Researchers found that men and women in Wales took the longest to contact their doctor once they had noticed a health concern or symptom (Source: University of EdinburghUniversity of Edinburgh).

Full details from University of Edinburgh 

Skin cancer rates in England higher than previously thought

Data from a newly established UK skin cancer database, the largest database of its kind in the world, has revealed that there are over 45,000 cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCC) every year in England, 350 per cent more than previous estimates suggested | JAMA Dermatology | via ScienceDaily

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Developed by experts at Queen Mary University of London and Public Health England (PHE), and funded by the British Association of Dermatologists, the database fills in gaps in the recording of skin cancer, ensuring that accurate numbers for the three most common types of skin cancer: melanoma, basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC), are available for the whole of the UK.

These data are important as they enable researchers and policy makers to evaluate the effectiveness of prevention initiatives, screening, staging and treatments for what is a very common cancer. The study has been published in JAMA Dermatology.

Full story at ScienceDaily

Journal reference: Venables, Z. et al. |  Nationwide Incidence of Metastatic Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma in England |  JAMA Dermatology | published online November 28th 2018