Age UK report: ‘Why call it care when no one cares?’

  • Age UK |  2018 | Older people and their families tell politicians about the problems they face with care

A new report by Age UK – ‘Why call it care when no one cares?’ – summarises the results of a series of listening events the charity  held with older people who are receiving care and their family carers earlier this year. 127 people participated in 13 sessions in total, which took place in the North, Midlands and South of England, in urban and rural places, and in more affluent and poorer areas.

Each of the listening events, were hosted by local Age UKs and had two parts:

  • in the first older people and their family carers talked about their personal experiences of care, highlighted the problems they faced and what would make life better;
  • and in the second they discussed various funding proposals and what they would mean for them and their families.

Age UK designed these events to help policymakers understand the real-life issues facing older people in need of care and their family carers in their constituencies, and to provide an opportunity to discuss potential solutions.  There was much commonality in the issues raised, and the same issues featured throughout the country,  showing that the problems facing adult social care are national.

The top five reasons mentioned the most in the sessions:

1. ‘Too many professional carers are in a rush and there’s no continuity

2. ‘Care often it isn’t very good’

3. ‘Social care is very expensive and often not good value for money’

4. ‘We family carers feel abandoned and unsupported by the NHS and social care’

5. ‘The social care system is dysfunctional and navigating it is a nightmare’

Older people suggested possible solutions to these issues:

1. ‘Everyone should contribute in some way’

2. ‘We’re only willing to pay more if we get a better service in return’

3. ‘We want any extra funds that are raised to be ring-fenced for care’

4. ‘We believe we need a new and better contract with family carers in our society’

5. ‘We older people and our families desperately want security’ (Age UK)

The full news piece can be read at Age UK 

You can read the full Age UK report here 

 

Choosing the right care home is stressful say 7 in 10 adults

Participants in a survey from the Care Quality Commission (CQC) rated choosing residential care for family as one of life’s more stressful experiences. Their survey (n equal to 1000) asked participants to rank their stress level during key life events, such as organising a wedding and finding a child a nursery or school place. 70% of the sample who were responsible for choosing care in a care home or at home – for themselves or a loved one – within the last three years rated choosing a care home as the most stressful life event. (via Healthwatch)

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Over half (52%) of people surveyed  cited choosing a care home and 31% had cited choosing care at home in their top three most stressful life decisions.

There was some variation in experience across the country, with the highest proportion of people in the North East (60%), Yorkshire and Humber (56%) and the North West and East Midlands (both 54%) saying that choosing a care home was their most stressful life decision.  These regions are some of those where CQC has found the highest proportion of adult social care services rated as Requires Improvement and Inadequate.

The findings have been published to raise awareness of how CQC’s inspection reports can be used to inform decision making about care, currently only 50 per cent of those looking into care options were consulting CQC’s reports. Of these, three-quarters acknowledged they provided them with a better understanding of the quality of care provided.

Care Quality Commission Choosing care is one of life’s most stressful experiences but trusted information can help, finds CQC

Healthwatch  Choosing care can be stressful

Enhanced health in care homes

Enhanced health in care homes: learning from experiences so far | The King’s Fund

This report draws on published literature about joining up and co-ordinating care homes and health services. It also draws on interviews with a range of providers, local authorities and CCGs. It aims to help care homes and NHS providers (including GPs), local authorities and CCGs who are thinking through how to join up and co-ordinate services locally and how to manage the complexities involved.

The report makes recommendations for extending enhanced health in care homes to all areas, supporting and developing leaders, and ensuring that people living in care homes can access high-quality health care.

Full report: Enhanced health in care homes: learning from experiences so far

National Audit of Inpatient Falls

The National Audit of Inpatient Falls (NAIF) is designed to capture data from acute, community and mental health hospitals relating to falls | Royal College of Physicians

This report provides:

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Image source: http://www.rcplondon.ac.uk
  • aggregated national results for the organisational aspects of leadership responsibilities, policies and procedures, highlighting deficiencies and changes since 2015
  • aggregated national averages for the clinical audit items, focusing on change since 2015, particularly where little progress has been made overall, or where there is a large variation in what has been achieved
  • detailed results from all individual hospitals, enabling comparison with their own performance in 2015, their performance against the guidance standards and a comparison with other hospitals.

Full report:  NAIF audit report 2017