Adult weight management

Public Health England has published guidance to support the commissioning and delivery of tier 2 adult weight management services.

This guidance supports commissioners and providers of tier 2 adult weight management services, including:

  • local authorities (LAs)
  • clinical commissioning groups (CCGs)
  • NHS institutions

The guidance is published under the following categories: following categories:

Commission and provide

Adult weight management services: commission and provide

Weight management services: insights into user experiences

Interventions

Data collection

NHS Commissioning of Specialised Services

This Commons Library briefing paper looks at the commissioning of specialised services by the NHS in England, for patients with rare or complex conditions | House of Commons Library

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How the commissioning process works is set out in further detail, as well as analysis of the financial management and transparency of specialised commissioning, and recent reforms introduced by NICE and NHS England, including reforms to the Cancer Drugs Fund.

The specialised commissioning budget for 2017/18 is £16.4 billion, 14.9% of the total NHS budget, and is set to rise to 15.8% by 2020/21 to reflect the increasing use of new treatments for previously untreatable conditions.

In its 2016 report, the National Audit Office (NAO) highlighted problems that NHS England had experienced in living within its budget. Some of the reasons for this included an underestimation of the budget required to effectively commission services when NHS England took over commissioning responsibility in 2013, as well as a lack of effective data on how services are commissioned on a regional basis, and problems with effective negotiation of prices with pharmaceutical companies.

This briefing paper looks in details at some of the issues highlighted by the NAO, and recent changes to the commissioning process that allow for a greater degree of cost control.

Healthy Commissioning

New report shows that only a minority of NHS commissioners making active use of Social Value Act | National Voices | Social Enterprise UK

New research conducted by National Voices and Social Enterprise UK, found that only 13% of Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) can clearly show that they are actively committed to pursuing social value in their procurement and commissioning decisions.

The authors of Healthy Commissioning warn that improved commitment to social value is vital to achieving the Five Year Forward View aim of creating a ‘new relationship with people and communities’ and NHS plans to move to more place-based ‘accountable care systems’. It is also vital to making sure the public pound is used as effectively as possible.

The Public Services (Social Value Act) 2012 requires commissioners to consider broader social, economic and environmental benefits to their area when making commissioning decisions.

The researchers found that:

  • 43% of respondents either had no policy on the Social Value Act; were not aware of a policy; or had a policy in some stage of development.
  • Just 25 CCGs (13%) demonstrated what the authors define as ‘highly committed, evidenced and active’ use of the Social Value Act.
  • Weighting procurement for social value, even amongst the most highly committed CCGs, is limited and low. A pass/fail question or a weighting of 2% of the total evaluation was common.
  • Analysis of Sustainability and Transformation Plans found that just 13% mention social value.

Download the full report : Healthy Commissioning: How the Social Value Act is being used by Clinical Commissioning Groups

Domestic abuse: a resource for health professionals

Responding to domestic abuse: a resource for health professionals | Department of Health

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Image source: http://www.gov.uk

This resource looks at how health professionals can support adults and young people over 16 who are experiencing domestic abuse, and dependent children in their households.

It will help health staff to identify potential victims, initiate sensitive routine enquiry and respond effectively to disclosures of abuse. Commissioners will gain insight into services to support people experiencing domestic violence and abuse, and the importance of joined-up local strategic planning.

The resource draws on the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence multi-agency guidelines on domestic violence and abuse, and provides:

  • the legal and policy contexts of domestic abuse in England
  • information for commissioners on effective integrated care pathways
  • information for service providers on shaping service delivery
  • what health practitioners need to know and do
  • information to ensure the right pathway and services are in place locally

Full document: Responding to domestic abuse: a resource for health professionals

Improving outcomes for children and families

The Local Government Association has published Improving outcomes for children and families in the early years: a key role for health visiting services

This guide highlights the importance of health visitors and commissioners to work together to monitor and evaluate the impact of the health visiting service.

The report includes case studies demonstrating examples of innovation.

Preventing falls and fractures

Public Health England has published Falls and fracture consensus statement: supporting commissioning for prevention.

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The guidance is aimed at local commissioning and strategic leads with a remit for falls, bone health and healthy ageing.  This document outlines approaches to interventions and activities helping prevent falls and fractures to improve health outcomes for older people.

The Royal College of Physicians has published Look out! Bedside vision check for falls prevention.

This guide aims to help ward staff assess a patient’s eyesight in order to help prevent them falling or tripping while in hospital.

Early benefits of delegated commissioning

NHS England have produced a series of Delegated commissioning case studies to show how CCGs are using delegated commissioning to improve care for local people. 

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CCGs have reported that delegated commissioning is leading to:

  • The development of clearer, more joined up visions for primary care, aligned to wider CCG and STP plans for improving health services;
  • Improved access to primary care;
  • Improved quality of care being delivered to patients;
  • Improved CCG relationships with member practices, including greater local ownership of the development of primary care services;
  • Increased clinical leadership in primary care commissioning, enabling more local decision making;
  • Greater involvement of patients in shaping services;
  • A more sustainable primary care system for the future.

 

NHS England have produced a series of case studies to show how CCGs are using delegated commissioning to improve care for local people: