Sugary beverage intake and preclinical Alzheimer’s

Excess sugar consumption has been linked with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology in animal models | Alzheimers & Dementia

soda-1300880_960_720.jpg

We examined the cross-sectional association of sugary beverage consumption with neuropsychological (N = 4276) and magnetic resonance imaging (N = 3846) markers of preclinical Alzheimer’s disease and vascular brain injury (VBI) in the community-based Framingham Heart Study. Intake of sugary beverages was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire.

Relative to consuming less than one sugary beverage per day, higher intake of sugary beverages was associated with lower total brain volume (1–2/day, β ± standard error [SE] = −0.55 ± 0.14 mean percent difference, P = .0002; >2/day, β ± SE = −0.68 ± 0.18, P < .0001), and poorer performance on tests of episodic memory (all P < .01). Daily fruit juice intake was associated with lower total brain volume, hippocampal volume, and poorer episodic memory (all P < .05). Sugary beverage intake was not associated with VBI in a consistent manner across outcomes.

Higher intake of sugary beverages was associated cross-sectionally with markers of preclinical AD.

Full reference: Pase, M.P. et a; (2017) Sugary beverage intake and preclinical Alzheimer’s disease in the community. Alzheimers & Dementia. Vol. 13 (Issue 9) pp. 955–964.

Advertisements

Effectiveness of dementia risk reduction messaging in NHS health checks | via @alzheimerssoc

NHS health check 40-64 dementia pilot research findings | Alzheimer’s Society

10774-2

The NHS Health Check programme is a statutory public health intervention commissioned by all local authorities in England. It aims to improve the health and wellbeing of adults aged 40-74 years through the promotion of earlier awareness, assessment, and management of the major risks factors and conditions driving premature death, disability and health inequalities in England.

The overall aim of the research was to evaluate the pilot and assess the feasibility of extending the NHS Health Check for 40-64 year olds to include a dementia risk reduction component. Specific objectives of the research included first, to understand the impact of the NHS Health Check on an individual’s knowledge and awareness of dementia risk reduction and the impact of the intervention on individuals’ intention to change behaviour.

The second objective was to identify (where sample sizes allowed) whether any differences in the delivery of the intervention between pilot sites had any effect on individual’s awareness and understanding of dementia risk reduction.

The third objective was to understand professional awareness and confidence in promoting dementia risk reduction messages and to identify further training requirements, resources and support.

The final objective was to assess any implications for services and commissioners and provide PHE with advice on any further longer-term evaluation that will be required.

Full report here

Dementia in older age: barriers to primary prevention and factors

Evidence review showing that changing some behaviours in midlife can reduce the chances of getting dementia in older age | PHE

watercolour-2053269_960_720.jpg

These documents help commissioners and researchers make decisions about prioritisation of primary prevention measures relevant to dementia.

This review, by the Personal Social Services Research Unit (PSSRU) at the London School of Economics and Political Science (2016), shows that there is evidence that the risk of dementia is increased by:

  • physical inactivity
  • current smoking
  • diabetes
  • hypertension in mid-life
  • obesity in mid-life and depression

It also shows that mental activity can reduce the risk of dementia.

To promote primary prevention of dementia, it is important to understand both the barriers to primary prevention and factors which facilitate primary prevention.

Read the full overview here

How physical exercise prevents dementia

Physical exercise seems beneficial in the prevention of cognitive impairment and dementia in old age, numerous studies have shown. Now researchers have explored in one of the first studies worldwide how exercise affects brain metabolism | ScienceDaily

sports-1050966_960_720

In order to further advance current state of knowledge on the positive influence of physical activity on the brain, gerontologists and sports physicians at Goethe University Frankfurt have examined the effects of regular exercise on brain metabolism and memory of 60 participants aged between 65 and 85 in a randomised controlled trial. Their conclusion: regular physical exercise not only enhances fitness but also has a positive impact on brain metabolism.

 

Mild Cognitive Impairment and Driving Cessation

Driving cessation is associated with significant morbidity in older people. People with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) may be at particular risk of this | Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders

stop-634941_960_720.jpg

Very little research has examined driving in this population. Given this, we sought to identify predictors of driving cessation in people with MCI.

One hundred and eighty-five people with MCI were recruited from 9 memory clinics around Australia. People with MCI and their carers reported their driving status and completed measures of cognition, function, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and medication use at regular intervals over a 3-year period.

Of the 144 people still driving at baseline, 50 (27.0%) stopped driving during the study. Older age, greater cognitive and functional impairment, and greater decline in cognition and function at 6 months predicted subsequent driving cessation. Twenty-nine of the 50 people (58%) who stopped driving were diagnosed with dementia during the study; all except one of whom ceased driving after their dementia diagnosis.

A significant proportion of people diagnosed with MCI stop driving over the following 3 years. This cannot be entirely attributed to developing dementia. Easily assessable characteristics – such as age, cognition, and function – and changes in these measures over 6 months predict driving cessation.

Full reference: Connors, M.H. et al. (2017) Mild Cognitive Impairment and Driving Cessation: A 3-Year Longitudinal Study. Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders. Vol. 44 (no. 1-2) pp. 63-70

One in three cases of dementia preventable

A new report identifies powerful tools to prevent dementia and touts the benefits of nonmedical interventions for people with dementia | ScienceDaily

170720094907_1_900x600

Image source: The Lancet

Managing lifestyle factors such as hearing loss, smoking, hypertension and depression could prevent one-third of the world’s dementia cases, according to a report by the first Lancet Commission on Dementia Prevention and Care. Presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) 2017 and published in The Lancet, the report also highlights the beneficial effects of nonpharmacologic interventions such as social contact and exercise for people with dementia.

The commission’s report identifies nine risk factors in early, mid- and late life that increase the likelihood of developing dementia. About 35 percent of dementia — one in three cases — is attributable to these risk factors, the report says.

By increasing education in early life and addressing hearing loss, hypertension and obesity in midlife, the incidence of dementia could be reduced by as much as 20 percent, combined.

In late life, stopping smoking, treating depression, increasing physical activity, increasing social contact and managing diabetes could reduce the incidence of dementia by another 15 percent.

Dementia care in hospitals

National Audit of Dementia Care in General Hospitals 2016-2017: Third Round of Audit Report | HQIP

This report presents the results of the third round of the National Audit of Dementia (NAD) with collected data between April and November 2016.

The National Audit of Dementia (care in general hospitals) measures the performance of general hospitals against criteria relating to care delivery which are known to impact upon people with dementia while in hospital.

The previous (second) round of audit, (reporting in 2013), showed that while significant progress in the care provided to people with dementia in general hospitals had taken place, some aspects of care still needed to evolve.

The full report and findings are available to download here