National Audit of Dementia

National Audit of Dementia: care in general hospitals 2018-2019 – Round 4 audit report | The Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership

This report presents the Round 4 results of the National Audit of Dementia.   Scores from each hospital are derived from key themes and are shown in comparison to the scores from Round 3.

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Image source: http://www.hqip.org.uk

There are several areas where improvement has been made: 96% of hospitals in England and Wales now have a system in place for more flexible family visiting; a large number (88%) of carers (and/or patients) receive a copy of the discharge plan; and more staff report being able to access finger food or snacks for patients with dementia.

Key areas for improvement include striving to ensure that more hospitals assess for delirium and that any member of staff involved in the care of people with dementia must have training relevant to their grade and include identification and management of delirium. This training should be recorded to provide assurance to the public and regulators.

For further detail and to download the report, click here

Hidden no more: Dementia and disability 

All Party Parliamentary Group | June 2019 | Hidden no more: Dementia and
disability 

A new report from the All Party Parliamentary Group aims to shine a spotlight on dementia as a disability, to enable people with dementia to assert their rights to services and for their rights as citizens to be treated fairly and equally. Thousands of people who responded to the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) inquiry agreed that they see dementia as a disability. But they told the APPG that society is lagging behind and failing to uphold the legal rights of people with dementia.  Within the report the All Party Parliamentary Group identify six key areas for action which have a direct impact on people’s daily lives, these are: 

alzheimers.org.uk
Image source: alzheimers.org.uk
  1. Employment
  2. Social protection
  3. Social care
  4. Transport
  5. Housing
  6. Community life

Full details from the Alzheimer’s Society

Reducing the risk of dementia

Risk reduction of cognitive decline and dementia | The World Health Organisation

who risk
Image source: apps.who.int/

These WHO guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations on lifestyle behaviours and interventions to delay or prevent cognitive decline and dementia.  Worldwide, around 50 million people have dementia and, with one new case every three seconds, the number of people with dementia is set to triple by 2050. The increasing numbers of people with dementia, its significant social and economic impact and lack of curative treatment, make it imperative for countries to focus on reducing modifiable risk factors for dementia.

These guidelines are intended as a tool for health care providers, governments, policy-makers and other
stakeholders to strengthen their response to the dementia challenge.

Full document: Risk reduction of cognitive decline and dementia

See also: WHO press release

Virtual reality can improve quality of life for people with dementia

Virtual reality (VR) technology could vastly improve the quality of life for people with dementia by helping to recall past memories, reduce aggression and improve interactions with caregivers, new research has discovered | University of Kent | via ScienceDaily

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Many people with dementia (PWD) residing in long-term care may face barriers in accessing experiences beyond their physical premises; this may be due to location, mobility constraints, legal mental health act restrictions, or offence-related restrictions.

In recent years, there have been research interests towards designing non-pharmacological interventions aiming to improve the Quality of Life (QoL) for PWD within long-term care.

The authors of this study explored the use of Virtual Reality (VR) as a tool to provide 360°-video based experiences for individuals with moderate to severe dementia residing in a locked psychiatric hospital.

The paper discusses the appeal of using VR for PWD, and the observed impact of such interaction. It also presents the design opportunities, pitfalls, and recommendations for future deployment in healthcare services. This paper demonstrates the potential of VR as a virtual alternative to experiences that may be difficult to reach for PWD residing within locked setting.

Full article: Tabbaa, L. et al. |  Bring the Outside In: Providing Accessible Experiences Through VR for People with Dementia in Locked Psychiatric Hospitals | Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 2019 | DOI: 10.1145/3290605.3300466

See also: VR can improve quality of life for people with dementia | ScienceDaily

Research shows dementia rates falling by 15% per decade over last 30 years

The risk of developing dementia is falling, thanks to lifestyle improvements such as reductions in smoking, new research has found. Researchers have said that while the overall number of cases is rising due to the population living longer, an individual’s chances of having the disease is going down | Alzheimers Research UK

International experts have presented research indicating that dementia incidence rates may be falling by up to 15% decade on decade. Analysing data from seven population-based studies in the United States and Europe, Prof Hofman and a global team of researchers set out to determine changes in the incidence of dementia between 1988 and 2015.

Of 59,230 individuals included in the research, 5,133 developed dementia. The rate of new dementia cases declined by 15% per decade, a finding that was consistent across the different studies included in the analysis.

The findings will be discussed at the Alzheimer’s Research UK Conference 2019 in Harrogate.

Full story at Alzheimer’s Research UK

See also:

In This video, lead author Albert Hofman, discusses trends in dementia incidence over the last three decades at the Alzheimer’s Research UK  Conference 2019. Prof. Hofman goes on to explain the reasoning behind these trends.

 

Dementia 2020 challenge: progress review

This document summarises the views of stakeholders on the progress of the challenge on dementia so far and sets out actions for the final 2 years of the challenge | Department of Health and Social Care

In 2015, the Dementia 2020 Challenge was launched. The Challenge aims to
make England, by 2020, the best country in the world for dementia care, support,
research and awareness. The Challenge identified 18 key commitments under four
themes: Dementia Awareness; Health and Care Delivery; Risk Reduction; and
Research and Funding.

Since then, significant progress has been made. The Dementia Diagnosis Rate is
above the Challenge’s target of 66.7%. There are now 2.78 million Dementia
Friends and 412 Communities have committed to becoming Dementia Friendly in
England and Wales (as of January 2019), and over one million NHS staff have
attended dementia awareness raising sessions.

During 2018, stakeholders from the health and social care system, and the charitable sector, were asked to comment on the progress of the actions set out in the Challenge on dementia 2020 implementation plan and what else needed to be done to complete them.

This report summarises the responses and sets out revised actions for 2018 to 2020.

Full report: Dementia 2020 Challenge: 2018 Review Phase 1