Introducing a Children’s Health Smartphone App at Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust

NHS | January 2019 | Introducing a Children’s Health Smartphone App at Walsall Healthcare NHS Trust

NHS England shares a case study that considers the impact of a smartphone app  on the development and implementation of a children’s health smartphone application. The app has significantly improved patient, carer and family experience as well as better use of resources locally (Source: NHS England).

pexels-photo-238480.jpegRead the full case study at NHS England 

How virtual reality is changing medical practice: “Doctors want to use this to give better patient outcomes”

BMJ | January 2019| How virtual reality is changing medical practice: “Doctors want to use this to give better patient outcomes”

A new feature in the BMJ describes how technology is having an impact on areas such as perioperative planning, medical training, psychiatry and palliative care and specifically how virtual reality is changing medical practice. 

Read the full piece at the BMJ 

Athens users can log in with their credentials or contact the Library 

How virtual reality is changing medical practice: “Doctors want to use this to give better patient outcomes”

BMJ | January 2019| How virtual reality is changing medical practice: “Doctors want to use this to give better patient outcomes”

A new feature in the BMJ describes how technology is having an impact on areas such as perioperative planning, medical training, psychiatry and palliative care and specifically how virtual reality is changing medical practice. 

Read the full piece at the BMJ 

Athens users can log in with their credentials or contact the Library 

NHS Long Term Plan: “Advances in technology mean outpatients appointment are not the fastest or most accurate way to provide specialist advice”

NHS  | January 2019 | NHS Long Term Plan

The NHS’ 10 year plan outlines how a third or outpatients appointments may be reduced as the current model is “outdated and unsustainable”.

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Outpatients traditionally serve at least three purposes, and in each case there are
opportunities for redesign. An outpatient appointment can provide: advice and diagnosis for a patient and their GP; follow-up review after a hospital procedure; and ongoing specialist input into a long-term condition. Technology means an outpatient appointment is often no longer the fastest or most accurate way of providing specialist advice on diagnosis or ongoing patient care. 

The plan describes  the traditional model of outpatient care as being “outdated  and unsustainable”.  It outlines its intention to  redesign services so that over the next five years patients will be able to avoid up to a third of face-to-face outpatient visits, removing the need for up to 30 million outpatient visits a year.

The document also includes a case study of Tower Hamlets  Chronic Kidney Disease e-Clinics where a single pathway from primary to secondary care with rapid
access to specialist advice provided by consultant led e-clinics have transformed the way the way this care is delivered.

Four reasons are cited as enabling these technology-driven shifts:

 

  1. They are already happening
    in parts of the NHS, so this is clearly ‘the art of the possible’.
  2. There is strong patient ‘pull’ for these new ways of accessing services, freeing-up staff time for those people who can’t or
    prefer not to.
  3. The hardware to support ‘mobile health’ is already in most people’s pockets –
    in the form of their smart phone – and the connection software is increasingly available for the NHS to credential from third party providers.
  4. The Long Term Plan provides dedicated funding to capitalise on these opportunities

Read the NHS Long Term Plan at the NHS Long Term Plan website  (Source: NHS Long Term Plan)

See also:

OnMedica | Number of outpatients appointments to be cut

Patients in Yorkshire set to benefit from revolutionary medical imaging due to University of Sheffield fundraising campaign

University of Sheffield | December 2018 | Patients in Yorkshire set to benefit from revolutionary medical imaging thanks to £2 million fundraising appeal

A campaign launched by the University of Sheffield in 2017 has raised £2million to make possible a revolutionary scanner in Yorkshire.  During the last 18 months, staff, current  students, alumni and members of the public and local business community, and friends of the University have supported the Sheffield Scanner campaign.

The high-tech scanner will provide unprecedented views of inside the human body by combining the power of both MRI and PET images in a single scan. It will help leading scientists and medics tackle some of the most devastating diseases facing millions of people including dementia, cancer, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s and motor neurone disease (MND).

The facility will also bring more clinical trials to the region, giving patients in Yorkshire access to ground-breaking new innovative treatments that are being developed. The scanner will be the only MRI-PET scanner in Yorkshire, the new Sheffield Scanner Facility will be attached to the Royal Hallamshire Hospital.

Dame Pam Shaw, Vice-President and Head of the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health at the University of Sheffield, and Director of the Sheffield NIHR Biomedical Research Centre for Translational Neuroscience, said:

“The combination of these two imaging techniques – MRI and PET – in one machine will let us detect extremely small abnormalities very accurately. We are hoping, and expecting, this will allow us to diagnose medical conditions much earlier. We will also be able to monitor how new innovative treatments are working much more nimbly than we have in the past.

Professor Koen Lamberts, President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Sheffield, said: “The success of this fundraising campaign is a fantastic achievement and marks the beginning of an exciting journey for the University, the Sheffield city region and beyond. I am extremely proud that Sheffield will now be home to one of only eight MRI-PET scanners in the UK.”

(Source: University of Sheffield)

Making NHS data work for everyone

This report from Reform looks at the access and use of data held by the NHS for product and service development purposes by the private sector.

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The report suggests that benefits can emerge from the NHS partnering with the private sector to develop healthcare technologies. The private sector can provide skills and know-how to develop data-driven tools whilst the NHS makes the data available alongside medical expertise – described as the “value exchange”.

Recommendations:
• Engaging with the public on how data about them is used within the NHS is crucial. However, no public-sector models exist that allow patients to participate in the conversation about what a fair value exchange might be. The report recommends that this should change.
• The Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) needs to create a national strategy, which provides a framework for the array of possible models that will not have an adverse effect at the national level. The report presents the first table of commercial models that could be explored.
• The paper suggests that transparency over data quality could be increased. It also suggests a way in which access to data could be sped up without compromising individuals’ privacy.
• The report recommends that the DHSC should invest in creating a new independent unit to help NHS organisations negotiate fair and proportionate partnerships.

Full report: Making NHS data work for everyone | Reform

Evidence standards framework for digital health technologies, published

NICE | December 2018 | Evidence standards framework for digital health technologies

A working group that includes NICE, Public Health England, MedCity and DigitalHealth. London, has published Evidence standards framework for digital health technologies.

The aim of these standards is to make it easier for innovators and commissioners to understand what good levels of evidence for digital healthcare technologies look like, while meeting the needs of the health and care system, patients, and users.

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The evidence standards framework comprises 2 sections:

  1. Evidence for effectiveness for intended use.
  2. Evidence for economic impact.

Both parts of the framework have a proportional approach to defining evidence standards. This recognises:

  • the sparsity of available evidence in the field of digital healthcare
  • the challenges of developing traditional clinical trials for digital health technologies
  • the significant opportunities offered by digital health technologies to collect real world data to inform effectiveness judgements (Source: NICE).

 Download the evidence standards framework for digital technologies

You can share your views on the evidence standards framework, by completing a short survey. The survey will close on Monday 7 January 2019.

Full details at NICE