New care models: harnessing technology

New care models: harnessing technology | NHS Confederation

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This report explores how five vanguards are implementing innovative digital technology solutions. It suggests that the starting point for the introduction of any new technology should always be from the perspective of the end user and that end-users should always be involved in the co-production of technological solutions.

Full report: New care models: harnessing technology

Additional link: NHS Confederation press release

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Plans announced to fast-track NHS digital technology

New technology designed to improve patient access, won’t solve the GP workforce problem, lead doctors have said today | OnMedica

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Image source: opensource.com – Flickr // CC BY-SA 2.0

Dr Richard Vautrey, chair of the British Medical Association’s GP Committee, has responded to health secretary Jeremy Hunt’s promise that every patient should be able to access medical records and book an appointment via an integrated app in 2018.

The health secretary is to outline the measures at today’s Health and Care Innovation Expo in Manchester.

The digital expansion plans include:

  • The expansion of the existing NHS 111 non-emergency phone line service to include a new online ‘triage’ service for less serious health problems.
  • An NHS-approved health apps to guide patient choice – NHS England will launch a library of NHS-assessed apps, as well as advising on other wearable devices, to ensure people can select reputable and effective products to monitor and improve their health.
  • A relaunch of the NHS Choices website to improve the range of services – it will be relaunched as NHS.UK with a fuller range of online patient services, including the ability to register with a GP, see and book appointments, and order and track prescriptions.
  • Instant access to personal health records online – inspired by the ‘blue button’ app in the US, the new NHS.UK site will also enable patients to securely download their personal health records.
  • More interactive, local information about the performance of health services.

Read the full overview here

NHS to build new cyber security centre

NHS Digital will go to tender for a new national cyber security system in response to critical internal review, that recommended strengthening cyber security |via HSJ

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The agency charged with protecting the NHS from cyber attacks is planning to build a new ‘security operations centre’. NHS Digital has published a request for information, seeking a “strategic partner” to improve its cyber security both internally and as part of its services across the NHS.

The partner would help build a security operations centre to bring together and improve many of NHS Digital’s “disparate” cyber services, including detecting threats, responding quickly and educating trusts.

The new system would provide a more advanced, data analytics driven threat intelligence service, designed to catch cyberattacks early.  Further details of the enhanced cybersecurity set up are expected later in the year, when NHS Digital goes out to tender.

The new centre is expected to be up and running by spring 2018.

Full story at HSJ

 

Roll out of NHS Wi-Fi to GP surgeries begins

NHS Digital has begun roll out of NHS WiFi to GP surgeries in England and it should be completed by the end of the year.

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Using NHS WiFi, patients will be able to access the internet free of charge in their GP’s waiting room, via their smart phone or tablet. It will enable patients to link in with local health clinics and services and is paving the way for future developments in digital patient care.

NHS WiFi will provide a secure, stable, and reliable WiFi capability, consistent across all NHS settings. It will allow patients and the public to download health apps, browse the internet and access health and care information.

Local Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) are responsible for choosing a supplier that can provide an NHS WiFi compliant system which suits their needs, and working with them to implement it across their local NHS sites. The chosen system must be based on a set of policies and guidance defined by NHS Digital.

Guidance available via NHS Digital relates to implementing NHS WiFi in GP practices. Hospitals and secondary care will follow in 2018.

Further details available here

Digital literacy important for delivering better & safer care

Our TEL Programme is excited to be working in partnership with the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) on some of our digital literacy work | HEE

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Image source: HEE

The RCN has endorsed our work to date and are working with us on promoting the widest use across the health and care landscape of our definition of digital literacy and the digital capabilities that sit within that definition. Our latest document‘Improving digital literacy’, published today, explains what digital literacy is and why it is important.

Ian Cumming, our Chief Executive, and Janet Davies, RCN’s Chief Executive and General Secretary, have written the foreword for the joint document which outlines:

  • Why digital capabilities are so important in the provision of the best care
  • Why the right digital knowledge, skills, behaviours and attitudes are important and relevant to each and all of us working in health and care
  • What those digital capabilities are
  • Work undertaken to date on the digital literacy programme of work.

The document also highlights the RCN’s focus on developing digital capabilities in the nursing and midwifery workforce and why this will bring tangible benefits to citizens and patients.

The cost-effectiveness of electronic discharge communications

The transition between acute care and community care can be a vulnerable period in a patients’ treatment due to the potential for postdischarge adverse events | BMJ Open

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Background: The vulnerability of this period has been attributed to factors related to the miscommunication between hospital-based and community-based physicians. Electronic discharge communication has been proposed as one solution to bridge this communication gap. Prior to widespread implementation of these tools, the costs and benefits should be considered.

Objective: To establish the cost and cost-effectiveness of electronic discharge communications compared with traditional discharge systems for individuals who have completed care with one provider and are transitioning care to a new provider.

Results: One thousand unique abstracts were identified, and 57 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility. Four studies met final inclusion criteria. These studies varied in their primary objectives, methodology, costs reported and outcomes. All of the studies were of low to good quality. Three of the studies reported a cost-effectiveness measure ranging from an incremental daily cost of decreasing average discharge note completion by 1 day of $0.331 (2003 Canadian), a cost per page per discharge letter of €9.51 and a dynamic net present value of €31.1 million for a 5-year implementation of the intervention. None of the identified studies considered clinically meaningful patient or quality outcomes.

Discussion: Economic analyses of electronic discharge communications are scarcely reported, and with inconsistent methodology and outcomes. Further studies are needed to understand the cost-effectiveness and value for patient care.

Full reference: Sevick, L.K. et al. (2017) A systematic review of the cost and cost-effectiveness of electronic discharge communications. BMJ Open. 7:e014722. 

Digital technology and adolescent conduct problems

Adolescents spend an unprecedented amount of time using digital technology to access the Internet and engage with social media. There is concern that this continuous connectivity could increase their mental health symptoms, especially for at-risk adolescents. | Journal of Pediatric Nursing

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A new US study has reported that on days that at-risk adolescents used technology more, they experienced more conduct problems and higher attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms compared to days when they used digital technologies less.

However, the study also found that on days when adolescents spent more time using digital technologies they were less likely to report symptoms of depression and anxiety.

Key findings:

•Daily digital technology use by at-risk adolescents is associated with worse mental health symptoms.
•Higher levels of digital technology use were associated with increases in next-day conduct problems.
•Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms increased with increased digital technology use.
•When adolescents spent more time using digital technologies they reported fewer symptoms of depression and anxiety.

Full reference: McBride, Deborah L. Daily Digital Technology Use Linked to Mental Health Symptoms for High-risk Adolescents. Journal of Pediatric Nursing: Nursing Care of Children and Families. Published online 7th June 2017