A quarter of cancer patients experience avoidable delay to diagnosis

One in four cancer patients experienced a delay to their diagnosis that could have been avoided, according to a new study | via Cancer Research UK

A new study, published in Cancer Epidemiology, looked at data the national cancer registry of around 14,300 people diagnosed with cancer in England in one year.

It found that nearly 3,400 patients experienced a delay that could have been avoided. Half of these patients waited around two months longer to be diagnosed compared with those who didn’t have an avoidable delay.

The reasons for delays are complex but researchers on this study attempted to identify what could go wrong. The study authors asked GPs to identify when the delay happened – before the patient saw their GP, while they were still being assessed by the GP practice or after they had referred them.

The data showed 13% of all avoidable delays happened before the patient saw their GP and 38% after the GP referred them to hospital. The other half (49%) happened while the patient was being assessed by the GP surgery including waiting for tests to be done and results to be sent back.

Full story at Cancer Research UK

Research article: Swann et al. | The frequency, nature and impact of GP-assessed avoidable delays in a population-based cohort of cancer patients | Cancer Epidemiology | published online 3 December 2019.

Delivering general practice with too few GPs

This briefing presents some ideas on how general practice can continue to be provided as the shortage of GPs becomes chronic | The Nuffield Trust

This briefing combines findings from a workshop with research evidence and specific examples of innovative practice around the country in order to identify generalisable lessons from current innovators and to outline the ways in which national and local policy can support new ways of delivering general practice.

Key messages:

  • Keep it local
    The design and delivery of new forms of general practice should take place at borough and network level so that services can be tailored to local contexts and the needs of practices and local populations.
  • Invest substantially in change
    A significant proportion of the £4.5 billion committed to general practice and primary care by 2020/21 should be set aside and sustained over several years to invest in capital and running costs and staff development.
  • Maintain realistic expectations about the pace of change that can be expected from a workforce under intense pressure

  • Ensure that high quality data is generated, collected and analysed

Full briefing: Rosen R (2019) Delivering general practice with too few GPs. |  Nuffield Trust

 

 

 

Delivering general practice with too few GPs | The Nuffield Trust

Using Online Consultations In Primary Care

Using Online Consultations In Primary Care: Implementation Toolkit | NHS England

GPs have always led the way in adopting new technology. This guide aims to support those individuals implementing online consultations as part of their role – in practices, within PCNs, CCGs or other organisations, with the successful adoption and seamless  integration of online consultations alongside face to face and other services.

This online consultation toolkit is an interactive document that provides a range of ideas and options for different professionals, including clinicians, at different points in their implementation journey.

Primary Care Networks: an overview for general practice teams

Primary Care Commissioning | August 2019| Primary Care Networks an overview for general practice teams

Primary Care Commissioning has released a slide deck to provide an overview for general practice teams, it covers the following:  

  1. Practice contracts
  2.  Background to changes
  3.  Your PCN
  4. Changes to QOF
  5. IT
  6. Network services
  7. Workforce
  8.  Funding
  9. Full details from Primary Care Commissioning

It also signposts key documents for PCNs

Its available from the PCC

 

The General Practice Nurse Education Network

General Practice Nurse Education Network | August 2019 | The General Practice Nurse Education Network

This network is part of a number of initiatives arising from the General Practice Nursing 10 point plan. The General Practice Nurse Education Network  (GPNEN)  provides a repository of online resources to assist those nurses working in General Practice to have a “one-stop shop” when looking for continuing professional development initiative and support. adult-blood-care-1350560

It also works to provide a framework for GPN practice education roles within primary care. Provide guidance and resources to primary care about how the new Nursing and Midwifery Standards for student supervision and assessment are applied

It also provides information for student nurses and those new to General Practice Nursing (Source: GPNEN).

A range of resources are available from the GPNEN

Full details about the Network are available from the General Practice Nurse Education Network

Making general practice a great place to work – a practical toolkit to improve the retention of GPs

BMA, Royal College of General Practitioners, NHS England & NHS Improvement | July 2019 | Making general practice a great place to work – a practical toolkit to improve the retention of GPs

The BMA, Royal College of General Practitioners, NHS England & NHS Improvement have developed a toolkit-Making general practice a great place to work – a practical toolkit to improve the retention of GPs– is aimed at system leaders and clinical leads working across primary care to develop robust local retention action plans that provide GPs with the support they require to develop fulfilled careers in general practice.
It also aims to tackle issues at practice, network and system level that may be impacting on local GP retention.

 

 

To support implementation of this toolkit, £12 million is being made available to STPs this year with further funding to follow in 2020/21. This is part of a wider approach and further guidance will follow on the introduction of fellowships for newly qualified
GPs, the development of the local training hub infrastructure to support local activity, and development of the multi-disciplinary team, building on strong growth to date (Source: BMA, Royal College of General Practitioners, NHS England & NHS Improvement).

Making general practice a great place to work