Using the Friends and Family Test to improve patient experience

This guidance sets out the requirements of the NHS Friends and Family Test (FFT). These revisions to the FFT guidance are effective from 1 April 2020 | NHS England

The NHS FFT is designed to be a quick and simple mechanism for patients and other people who use NHS services to give feedback, which can then be used to identify what is working well and to improve the quality of any aspect of patient experience. feedback-3239454_1920

This guidance is intended to support all provider organisations that are required through their NHS Standard Contracts (including independent sector providers, primary medical and primary dentistry contracts) to deliver the FFT.  It is hoped commissioners will find it useful too.

The guidance replaces all previous implementation guidance for the patient focused FFT, including the guidance specifically relating to GPs and dentists, and the supplementary guidance and advice published in relation to information governance, sensitive situations and contracting with a commercial supplier of FFT services.

Full resource: NHS England and NHS Improvement guidance: Using the Friends and Family Test to improve patient experience

[NICE Guidance] Letermovir for preventing cytomegalovirus disease after a stem cell transplant

NICE |July 2019 | Letermovir for preventing cytomegalovirus disease after a stem cell transplant

NICE has today published final guidance which recommends the use of letermovir for the prevention of  cytomegalovirus reactivation and disease after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant in adults 

Read the full guidance from NICE

 

Whole systems approach to obesity

This edition of Health Matters focuses on Public Health England’s Whole systems approach to obesity guide, which is designed to support local action on addressing obesity and promoting a healthy weight.

This guide and set of resources can be used to support the implementation of a whole systems approach to obesity.  It is intended for local authorities and partners, including the NHS, local businesses and the community and voluntary sector.

The guide covers:

  • the role of local authorities
  • the benefits of taking a whole systems approach
  • the 6-phase process – each phase provides practical support

Each phase has accompanying resources. Included with the guide is a separate ‘learning report’, explaining the findings of the co-production and testing of the guide with local authorities.

Full detail: Whole systems approach to obesity | Public Health England

Reducing the risk of dementia

Risk reduction of cognitive decline and dementia | The World Health Organisation

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Image source: apps.who.int/

These WHO guidelines provide evidence-based recommendations on lifestyle behaviours and interventions to delay or prevent cognitive decline and dementia.  Worldwide, around 50 million people have dementia and, with one new case every three seconds, the number of people with dementia is set to triple by 2050. The increasing numbers of people with dementia, its significant social and economic impact and lack of curative treatment, make it imperative for countries to focus on reducing modifiable risk factors for dementia.

These guidelines are intended as a tool for health care providers, governments, policy-makers and other
stakeholders to strengthen their response to the dementia challenge.

Full document: Risk reduction of cognitive decline and dementia

See also: WHO press release

To grow up healthy, children need to sit less and play more

World Health Organization | April 2019 | To grow up healthy, children need to sit less and play more

New guidelines on physical activity for children have been developed by experts at the World Health Organization (WHO),  the guidelines are the results of assessment of young children of inadequate sleep, and time spent sitting watching screens or restrained in chairs and prams. WHO also reviewed evidence around the benefits of increased activity levels. 

They are intended to provide recommendations on the amount of time in a 24-hour
day that young children, under 5 years of age, should spend being physically active or sleeping for their health and wellbeing, and the maximum recommended time these children should spend on screen-based sedentary activities or time restrained.

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Recommendations at a glance:

Infants (less than 1 year) should:

  • Be physically active several times a day in a variety of ways, particularly through interactive floor-based play; more is better. For those not yet mobile, this includes at least 30 minutes in prone position(tummy time) spread throughout the day while awake.
  • Not be restrained for more than 1 hour at a time (e.g. prams/strollers, high chairs, or strapped on a caregiver’s back). Screen time is not recommended. When sedentary, engaging in reading and storytelling with a caregiver is encouraged.
  • Have 14–17h (0–3 months of age) or 12–16h (4–11 months of age) of good quality sleep, including naps.

Children 1-2 years of age should:

  • Spend at least 180 minutes in a variety of types of physical activities at any intensity, including moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity, spread throughout the day; more is better.
  • Not be restrained for more than 1 hour at a time (e.g., prams/strollers, high chairs, or strapped on a caregiver’s back) or sit for extended periods of time. For 1-year-olds, sedentary screen time (such as watching TV or videos, playing computer games) is not recommended. For those aged 2 years, sedentary screen time should be no more than 1 hour; less is better. When sedentary, engaging in reading and storytelling with a caregiver is encouraged.
  • Have 11-14 hours of good quality sleep, including naps, with regular sleep and wake-up times.

Children 3-4 years of age should:

  • Spend at least 180 minutes in a variety of types of physical activities at any intensity, of which at least 60 minutes is moderate- to vigorous intensity physical activity, spread throughout the day; more is better.
  • Not be restrained for more than 1 hour at a time (e.g., prams/strollers) or sit for extended periods of time. Sedentary screen time should be no more than 1 hour; less is better. When sedentary, engaging in reading and storytelling with a caregiver is encouraged.
  • Have 10–13h of good quality sleep, which may include a nap, with regular sleep and wake-up times (Source:WHO).

 

WHO guidelines on physical activity, sedentary behaviour and sleep for children under 5 years of age

GP contract directions 2019 to 2020

Department of Health and Social Care | March 2019 | GP contract directions 2019 to 2020

The Department of Health and Social Care has released guidance  setting out the legal framework under which GPs operate and are paid.

The primary medical services (directed enhanced services) directions 2019

The general medical services statement of financial entitlements (amendment) directions 2019

The general medical services statement of financial entitlements (payment in respect of indemnity fees) direction 2019

Full details from the Department of Health and Social Care

Air pollution: outdoor air quality and health

This updated NICE quality standard covers road-traffic-related air pollution and its impact on health. It describes high-quality actions in priority areas for improvement | National Institute for Health & Social Care

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In a new Quality Standard, Nice has suggested councils should use their planning permission powers to make sure developers take steps to reduce pollution where people live. The publication recommends houses, flats, schools, nurseries and care homes be protected from pollution. Nice also add that councils should actively try to reduce the number of people on the roads, encouraging them to take public transport, cycle or walk, suggesting councils should plant trees and plants outside and on roofs, and create areas for people to walk and cycle in clean air.

Air pollution causes an estimated 40,000 premature deaths a year in the UK and is linked to health problems from childhood illnesses to heart disease and dementia.

Full document: Air pollution: outdoor air quality and health | Quality standard [QS181] NICE | February 2019

See also: Air pollution: outdoor air quality and health | NICE guideline [NG70] Published  June 2017