Health Foundation: Mortality and life expectancy trends in the UK

The Health Foundation | December  2019 | Mortality and life expectancy trends in the UK

The Health Foundation commissioned a research team from the London School of Economics and the Vienna Institute of Demography to carry out a comprehensive literature review and analysis of trends, and how they compared with what is happening in other countries. This research forms the basis of the report Mortality and life expectancy trends in the UK. 

 

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Image source: health.org.uk

Full details from The Health Foundation 

Mortality and life expectancy trends in the UK

Social determinants of health

This briefing presents the main findings from research commissioned by the Health Foundation, and carried out by the FrameWorks Institute, analysing public understanding, expert opinion and media narrative around health in order to develop more effective approaches to communicating evidence | The Health Foundation

The Health Foundation is working with the FrameWorks Institute to develop a deeper appreciation of the ways in which people understand and think about health in order to develop more effective approaches to communicating evidence.

This briefing presents the main findings from research analysing public understanding, expert opinion and media narrative around health. It also presents findings from questions sponsored by the Health Foundation in the 2017 British Social Attitudes survey.

Four key challenges are identified that communicators must tackle to achieve wider public acceptance of the evidence on the social determinants of health.

The briefing concludes by reiterating that by building wider understanding of the social determinants beyond those working in the field, we can build support for the policies and programmes needed to reduce health inequalities and improve health.

Key points
  • Despite extensive evidence for the impact of social determinants on people’s health, public discourse and policy action is limited in acknowledging the role that societal factors such as housing, education, welfare and work play in shaping people’s long-term health.
  • There are many reasons for this, but one factor that merits greater attention is the way in which the evidence is communicated to and understood by the public.
  • The FrameWorks Institute has identified a range of ‘cultural models’– common but implicit assumptions and patterns of thinking – that give deeper insight into how people think about what makes them healthy.
  • Understanding which cultural models promote – or obscure – people’s awareness of the importance of social determinants is an important first step in developing effective ways of framing the evidence.

Full briefing: Reframing the conversation on the social determinants of health | The Health Foundation

Unfinished Business: An assessment of the national approach to improving cancer services in England 1995–2015

The Health Foundation | November 2018 | Unfinished Business: An assessment of the national approach to improving cancer services in England 1995–2015

A major report of the progress in cancer care during the last two decades has been released by The Health Foundation. It reports that progress has been made on reducing mortality, and improving the chances of survival and the experience of care, for people in England diagnosed with cancer. 

Unfinished business
Image source: .health.org.uk

Unfinished Business sets out recommendations to help close the gap in survival between England and other comparable countries.

These include: radical improvements in early diagnosis and detection of cancer, such as increasing investment in diagnostic equipment, building public understanding of cancer symptoms, improving resourcing of primary care, greater support for GPs to refer more patients and supporting collaboration across primary and secondary care (Source: The Health Foundation).

Read the report in full from The Health Foundation 

Read The Health Foundation’s press release 

Understanding the health care needs of people with multiple health conditions

The Health Foundation | November 2018 | Understanding the health care needs of people with multiple health conditions

Meeting the needs of people with multiple conditions at the same time as the NHS
is treating more patients than ever is a complex challenge. Preventing people from
developing conditions or delaying the onset of conditions will have the greatest benefits for individuals, their families, the economy and the NHS.  New research published by The Health Foundation demonstrates the importance of linking anonymised NHS data across primary and secondary care to gain greater insight into people’s care.

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  • Analysis of data in the period between 2014 to 2016 of 300,000 people in England found that a quarter of adults (25%) had 2+ health conditions, equivalent to approximately 14.2 million people in England.
  • More than half (55%) of hospital admissions and outpatient visits and three quarters (75%) of primary care prescriptions are for people living with 2+conditions.
  • Those who live in the  most affluent fifth of areas, people can expect to have 2+ conditions by the time they are 71 years old, but in the most-deprived fifth, people reach the same level of illness a decade earlier, at 61 years of age.

To improve care for people with multiple conditions it is critical that the NHS long-term plan identifies and addresses the complexity of their needs. The report sets out six steps the NHS could take to achieve this.

These are:

  • supporting those with multiple conditions to live well, for example by investing in
    self-management support for people with multiple conditions
  •  developing new models of NHS care for those with multiple conditions
  • resourcing the vital role of primary care, particularly in deprived areas
  •  designing secondary care around those with multiple conditions
  • using data and sharing information to improve care for those with multiple
    conditions, including greater data linkage
  • robustly evaluating what works.

Key points

  • Analysis of data from 2014 to 2016 for 300,000 people in England found that one in four adults had 2+ health conditions, equating to approximately 14.2 million people in England.
  • Over half (55%) of hospital admissions and outpatient visits and three quarters (75%) of primary care prescriptions are for people living with 2+conditions.
  • In the least-deprived fifth of areas, people can expect to have 2+ conditions by the time they are 71 years old, but in the most-deprived fifth, people reach the same level of illness a decade earlier, at 61 years of age (Source: The Health Foundation).

    Read the full report from The Health Foundation 

Increasing continuity of care in General Practice

The Health Foundation is supporting five large-scale GP practices and federations to carry out targeted improvement work to increase continuity of care in their practices.

The Increasing Continuity of Care in General Practice programme will explore what continuity of care will look like, considering relationships between GPs and patients, and also examining whether better information and management practices can help increase continuity with the aim of bringing benefits to both staff and patients.

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This programme is inspired by recent Health Foundation research which demonstrated that patients with ambulatory care sensitive conditions who see the same GP a greater proportion of the time have fewer unplanned hospital admissions. The programme has been developed with the advice and support of the Royal College of General Practitioners.

Each project will run for up to two years and each project team will receive up to £250,000 of funding to support the implementation, evaluation and dissemination of findings from their work.

Full story at The Health Foundation

Health Foundation selects 11 projects to join programme to improve analytical capability in health and care services

Health Foundation | September 2018 | Health Foundation selects 11 projects to join programme to improve analytical capability in health and care services

The Health Foundation has selected 11 projects to take part in the latest round of its Advancing Applied Analytics programme – which aims to improve analytical capability in support of health and care services.

These include:

1. ABCi Mathematical Modelling and Analytics Academy
Aneurin Bevan University Health Board

2. Personalised medicine analytics dashboard for triaging patients in emergency departments
Barking, Havering and Redbridge University Hospitals NHS Trust

3. Use of novel modelling techniques and routinely collected data to explore responses to winter pressures 
Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust (Yorkshire and Humber Improvement Academy)

4. Developing a versatile tool for modelling pathway capacity in NHS organisations
Bristol, North Somerset and South Gloucestershire Clinical Commissioning Group

5. Building analyst capabilities to demonstrate the value of connected health and council data
Care City

6. Mind the gap: developing effective communications between decision makers and analysts in health and care
Devon Partnership NHS Trust

7. Simulation modelling in mental health services 
Hampshire and Isle of Wight Sustainability and Transformation Partnership

8. A clinically driven multidisciplinary team approach to data science
NHS Bolton Clinical Commissioning Group

9. Applying best-in-class analytics to a whole-system approach to managing knee problems
NHS Forth Valley

10. Can interactive data visualisation help clinicians improve patient care?
Northumberland Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust

11. System-wide early warning tool for acute pathways based on actionable intelligence
Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust

Full details from The Health Foundation