What does the Autumn Budget mean for the NHS and social care?

In the budget this week, the Chancellor committed around £2 billion extra for the NHS next year. Nigel Edwards of the Nuffield Trust said this will bring respite for patients and staff, but is only around half of what’s needed.

In a Q&A about the budget, Tom Moberly, The BMJ’s UK editor, met with John Appleby (Nuffield Trust), Anita Charlesworth (Health Foundation) and Siva Anandaciva (King’s Fund) to discuss what it all means for the NHS and social care. You can watch the discussion below:

See also: Autumn Budget 2017: what it means for health and social care | The Kings Fund | Nuffield Trust | The Health Foundation

 

 

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Quality improvement

Making the case for quality improvement: lessons for NHS boards and leaders | The King’s Fund | The Health Foundation

This briefing outlines the following ten lessons for NHS leaders which provide a starting point for those seeking to embed quality improvement in their work:

  • Make quality improvement a leadership priority for boards.
  • Share responsibility for quality improvement with leaders at all levels.
  • Don’t look for magic bullets or quick fixes.
  • Develop the skills and capabilities for improvement.
  • Have a consistent and coherent approach to quality improvement.
  • Use data effectively.
  • Focus on relationships and culture.
  • Enable and support frontline staff to engage in quality improvement.
  • Involve patients, service users and carers.
  • Work as a system.

The briefing makes the case for quality improvement to be at the heart of local plans for redesigning NHS services.

Full report available here

Improving quality of care through partnerships and collaboration

Partnerships for improvement: ingredients for success | The Health Foundation

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The idea of partnerships and collaboration across organisational boundaries is at the heart of NHS reforms in England. This briefing from the Health Foundation looks at what makes successful partnerships between providers at an organisational level, providing a snapshot of some of the key ingredients needed for successful partnerships.

The report looks at a range of current organisational partnerships focusing on five different partnering arrangements. It also includes interviews with national leaders, and draws learning to help inform and guide policymakers and providers.

The report finds that partnering does have potential benefits, but these are not easy or quick to achieve. To have a meaningful impact on the quality of care, the right form of partnering needs to be used in the right context and it needs to be accompanied by the right set of enabling factors – as described by the report.

Full briefing: Partnerships for improvement: ingredients for success

Related: Health Foundation blog: Is together always better? How good are NHS organisations and the wider system at achieving the potential benefits of partnering?

What makes us healthy?

The Health Foundation has published What makes us healthy?

This infographic is part of a new series of infographics and accompanying blogs and commentaries to describe and explain the social determinants of health in an accessible and engaging way. This infographic shows the extent to which health is primarily shaped by factors outside the direct influence of healthcare and invites people to look at this bigger picture.

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Image source: http://www.health.org.uk

Hospital performance

The NHS Combined Performance Summary is a monthly release of data on key performance metrics for the NHS. Here are some of the most important aspects relating to quality. The Health Foundation has issued a statement about this month’s data release, which can be read here.

For more in-depth analysis of the data over time, visit the QualityWatch indicators.

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Image source: http://www.qualitywatch.org.uk/

 

Care quality measures

The Health Foundation and Nuffield Trust have published Quality at a cost: QualityWatch annual statement 2016.

This report looks at a range of care quality measures across the NHS in England. It highlights several areas of health care where standards have improved, but the authors point to slowing improvement in other areas, growing waiting times and continuing financial pressures.

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Image source: http://www.qualitywatch.org.uk/

QualityWatch routinely monitors over 300 indicators spread across all domains of quality. This report considers a selection of areas from within this set, covering different stages of a patient’s experience of the health service, to give a picture of quality in 2016.

It looks across six main areas:

  • Public health
  • Primary care
  • Ambulances
  • Hospital care
  • Mental health
  • Condition-specific care (stroke and hip fracture)

The report observes that the pressure of austerity did not impact on quality measures straight away, but took a few years to be felt. Authors conclude that further ‘delayed decline’ could occur in other aspects of care quality, such as effectiveness of treatment or patient safety, given the extent of the challenges faced and ongoing austerity in health and social care spending.

A clear road ahead

This report from The Health Foundation recommends the creation of a single, coherent and compelling quality strategy for the NHS in England.

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image source: Dave Young – Flickr // CC BY 2.0

A clear road ahead sets out a practical and feasible set of actions for policymakers to safeguard and improve care within current priorities, as well as support the development of the NHS for years to come. It recommends that national bodies undertake coordinated action to:

  • articulate a single set of quality goals and common definition of quality
  • provide unified national leadership for quality
  • build on experience and evidence
  • update a set of core quality metrics
  • articulate a shared understanding of how improvements in quality and costs are linked – and pursue both in tandem
  • provide unified regional leadership for quality
  • inform the future quality agenda

Download the full report: A clear road ahead Creating a coherent quality strategy for the English NHS