National Audit of Dementia

National Audit of Dementia: care in general hospitals 2018-2019 – Round 4 audit report | The Healthcare Quality Improvement Partnership

This report presents the Round 4 results of the National Audit of Dementia.   Scores from each hospital are derived from key themes and are shown in comparison to the scores from Round 3.

dementia audit
Image source: http://www.hqip.org.uk

There are several areas where improvement has been made: 96% of hospitals in England and Wales now have a system in place for more flexible family visiting; a large number (88%) of carers (and/or patients) receive a copy of the discharge plan; and more staff report being able to access finger food or snacks for patients with dementia.

Key areas for improvement include striving to ensure that more hospitals assess for delirium and that any member of staff involved in the care of people with dementia must have training relevant to their grade and include identification and management of delirium. This training should be recorded to provide assurance to the public and regulators.

For further detail and to download the report, click here

NHS inpatient satisfaction falls for first time in six years

Adult inpatient survey 2018 | Care Quality Commission (CQC)

The results of the latest inpatient survey show what over 75,000 adults who stayed in hospital for at least one night in July last year said about the care they received. The survey covered the quality of information and communication with staff, whether they were given enough privacy, the amount of support given to help them eat and drink, and their discharge arrangements. The results are provided for England as a whole and by NHS trust.

feedback-3676922_1920Across the majority of questions asked in the survey there has been no improvement since it was last carried out, and this year’s results show an increase in those reporting lengthy delays, greater dissatisfaction with the amount of information provided when leaving hospital, and those who felt a lack of involvement in their care.

Most results for the 2018 Adult Inpatient Survey have slightly declined since last year or remained static.

Positive findings:

  • Relationships with the medical and nursing staff are usually positive although there is a small decline compared to last year. For example, patients reported that overall, doctors and nurses answered their questions in a way they understood.
  • Trust in doctor and nurse is high, although declining slightly compared to last year.
  • Fundamental needs of most patients are being met in terms of food, hydration and rest.
  • The proportion of patients reporting being given enough privacy when being examined or treated continues to be very high.

However, this year’s results indicate that there are many areas in need of improvement:

  • Patients are reporting poorer experience when it comes to the integration of their care.
  • Patients are reporting that they are waiting too long at admission and longer than previous years at discharge.
  • At the time of being discharged, significant numbers of patients were unsure about their situation. This includes not being given appropriate information about their care after leaving the hospital, and not receiving enough notice.
  • Significant numbers of patients reported not being sufficiently involved in decisions regarding their care and treatment.

Certain groups of patients consistently reported poorer experiences of their time in hospital, including

  • Patients with a mental health condition
  • Younger patients (aged 16 to 35)
  • Patients who were admitted in an emergency

Full report: Adult inpatient survey 2018

CQC press release: Confidence and trust in hospital staff high but overall improvements in people’s inpatient experience have stalled

See also:

 

Making hospitals safe for people with diabetes

Diabetes UK | October 2018 | Making hospitals safe for people with diabetes

The report from Diabetes UK has been created by an alliance of groups and individuals striving to improve hospital care for people with diabetes. Thorough engagement with diabetes inpatient teams, ward staff, people with diabetes and hospital management means we now understand the depth of the challenges facing the NHS in improving diabetes inpatient care. For their report, Diabetes UK visited
hospitals across the country to find out what works.

Making hospitals safe Diabetes UK

Image source: Diabetes.org.uk

The report outlines six points that the UK needs to make hospitals safer for people with diabetes.

  • multidisciplinary diabetes inpatient teams in all hospitals
  • strong clinical leadership from diabetes inpatient teams
  • knowledgeable healthcare professionals who understand diabetes
  • better support in hospitals for people to take ownership of their diabetes
  • better access to systems and technology
  • more support to help hospitals learn from mistakes.

The report outlines these points in more detail and highlights what needs to be in place in all acute hospitals across England to make sure every stay for someone with diabetes is safe.

The report’s recommendations are based on models from across the UK which have been shown to improve patient care (Source: Diabetes UK).

Mental health patients report poorer hospital experiences

Young people and those with mental health problems experience a poorer than average inpatient experience, new data shows | Adult inpatient survey 2017 | Care Quality Commission | via OnMedica

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The majority of people who stayed as an inpatient in hospital were happy with the care they received, had confidence in the doctors and nurses treating them and had a better overall experience, according to a national survey from the Care Quality Commission (CQC).

However, for a second year running, responses were less positive across most areas for patients with a mental health condition. Those with mental health conditions said they had less confidence and trust in hospital staff, thought they were treated with less respect and dignity and felt less informed about their care. These patients gave lower than average scores in relation to whether their needs, values and preferences were fully considered, and for the quality of the coordination and integration of their care.

The survey asked people to give their opinions on the care they received, including quality of information and communication with staff, whether they were given enough privacy, the amount of support given to help them eat and drink and assist with personal hygiene, and on their discharge arrangements.

For more information, please see the Adult inpatient survey 2017: Statistical release, which provides the results for all questions and contextual policy information.

Older people living with frailty in hospital

Comprehensive care: research on older patients living with frailty in hospital | The National Institute for Health Research

Comprehensive Care looks at the concept of ‘frailty’ in older people living in hospital. It brings together NIHR research on what can be done to identify and manage the needs of this group of people and avoid potential problems. With the right support, patients can continue to live well at the end of their hospital stay.

frailty
Image source: http://www.dc.nihr.ac.uk

This themed review highlights completed and ongoing studies outlining best practice in secondary care for older people living with frailty.  It covers assessment; identifying and managing symptoms associated with frailty in hospital; discharge planning; and caring environments.

Full report: Comprehensive care: research on older patients living with frailty in hospital

Children and young people’s survey 2016

Latest CQC survey looks at the experiences of children, young people and their parents and carers attending hospital for treatment as an inpatient or day case.

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The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has published the findings of it’s national survey looking into children and young people’s experiences of inpatient and day case care. Just under 35,000 respondents, including over 11,000 children and young people, were able to speak up about their healthcare experience.

Overall children and young people’s experiences of inpatient and day case care were mostly positive. The majority of children and young people said they were well looked after while in hospital, staff were friendly and that they received answers to their questions. Most parents and carers reported positive experiences for how their child’s pain was managed and for receiving enough information about new medication.

The survey results suggest there is scope for improvement in a number of areas, including:

  • Children and young people having enough things to do whilst in hospital
  • Involving children and young people in decision making
  • Being treated on age appropriate wards

Full detail at Care Quality Commission

 

National Audit of Inpatient Falls

The National Audit of Inpatient Falls (NAIF) is designed to capture data from acute, community and mental health hospitals relating to falls | Royal College of Physicians

This report provides:

falls audit
Image source: http://www.rcplondon.ac.uk
  • aggregated national results for the organisational aspects of leadership responsibilities, policies and procedures, highlighting deficiencies and changes since 2015
  • aggregated national averages for the clinical audit items, focusing on change since 2015, particularly where little progress has been made overall, or where there is a large variation in what has been achieved
  • detailed results from all individual hospitals, enabling comparison with their own performance in 2015, their performance against the guidance standards and a comparison with other hospitals.

Full report:  NAIF audit report 2017