A citizen-led approach to health and care: Lessons from the Wigan Deal

The King’s Fund | June 2019 | A citizen-led approach to health and care: Lessons from the Wigan Deal

A new report from The King’s Fund provides  an independent critique of the Wigan Deal – a citizen- led approach to health and care-drawing on in-depth research, including interviews with key stakeholders, focus groups with members of the public and evidence from data analysis. It explores what local authorities, NHS organisations and others can learn from Wigan’s journey of transformation (Source: The King’s Fund).

Overview 

Download the full report

Insights from the spread of the primary care home

The King’s Fund | June 2019 | Insights from the spread of the primary care home

The King’s Fund has published Insights from the spread of the primary care home, a report that looks at the factors that contributed to the spread of the ‘primary care home’,  a type of primary care network, from concept to more than 200 sites in a few years. The King’s Fund draw on a series of interviews with staff from the National Association of Primary Care (NAPC, who curated the primary care home concept for use in England in 2015), NHS England (who supported the work) and local sites (who delivered changes on the ground).

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Image source: .kingsfund.org.uk

 

The report identifies factors that enabled the spread of primary care homes, as well as the factors that made the spread harder. It provides insights for the NAPC and others that can inform their health and care transformation efforts (Source: The King’s Fund).

Report available from The King’s Fund 

Spare change: the public and NHS funding

Is the NHS adequately funded, and how should funding be raised? Harry Evans explores the findings of the British Social Attitudes survey on public attitudes towards NHS funding and taxation | The Kings Fund

This article examines the following questions:

  • Has concern about NHS funding fallen?
  • Have attitudes towards NHS taxes changed?
  • What are the public’s views about alternative funding measures?
  • Are people more positive or more optimistic?

Full article at The Kings Fund

Related: Public satisfaction with the NHS and social care in 2018: Results from the British Social Attitudes survey

Key areas for action on the health and care workforce

Closing the gap: Key areas for action on the health and care workforce | Nuffield Trust |  The King’s Fund | The Health Foundation

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Staffing is the make-or-break issue for the NHS in England. Workforce shortages are already having a direct impact on patient care and staff experience. This report calls for urgent action to avoid a vicious cycle of growing shortages and declining quality. The workforce implementation plan to be published later this year presents a pivotal opportunity to do this.

In this report, experts from the Nuffield Trust, The King’s Fund and the Health Foundation set out a series of policy actions that, evidence suggests, should be at the heart of the workforce implementation plan. This report focuses on nursing and general practice, where the workforce problems are particularly severe. The authors suggest a number of high-impact policy actions which, if properly funded and well implemented across the NHS would over time create a sustainable model for general practice and help to eliminate nursing shortages. These will require investment of an extra £900 million per year by 2023/24 into the budget of Health Education England.

Closing the gap: Key areas for action on the health and care workforce – full report

Closing the gap: Key areas for action on the health and care workforce – overview

See also: Offer £5,200 grants to nursing students and ramp up overseas recruitment to stop NHS workforce crisis | The Kings Fund

 

Public satisfaction with the NHS and social care in 2018

Since 1983, NatCen Social Research’s British Social Attitudes survey has asked members of the public in England, Scotland and Wales about their views on the NHS and health and care issues more generally.  Alongside the Nuffield Trust, in this publication the King’s Fund  explores the findings from the 2018 survey.

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Image source: http://www.kingsfund.org.uk

The BSA is a ‘gold standard’ survey and is conducted the same way every year, with the data provideing a rich time trend going back to 1983. This adds a depth and context to the findings that no other measure of NHS satisfaction provides. As a result, when satisfaction changes in the BSA, we are as confident as we can be that it reflects a genuine change in public attitudes.

Key findings

Satisfaction with the NHS overall in 2018

  • Public satisfaction with the NHS overall continued to fall in 2018. Overall satisfaction was 53 per cent – a 3 percentage point drop from the previous year and the lowest level since 2007.
  • Older people were more satisfied than younger people: 61 per cent of those aged 65 and over were satisfied with the NHS compared to 51 per cent of those aged 18–64.
  • Satisfaction levels also differed between supporters of different political parties: 58 per cent of supporters of the Conservative party were satisfied compared to 51 per cent of supporters of the Labour party.
  • The four main reasons people gave for being satisfied with the NHS overall were: the quality of care; the fact that the NHS is free at the point of use; the range of services and treatments available; and the attitudes and behaviour of NHS staff.
  • The four main reasons people gave for being dissatisfied with the NHS overall were: long waiting times; staff shortages; a lack of funding; and money being wasted.

Full detail at The King’s Fund

Full publication: Public satisfaction with the NHS and social care in 2018: Results from the British Social Attitudes survey

See also:

Race equality in the NHS workforce

This podcast explores big ideas in health and care, and features experts from The King’s Fund and beyond discussing the NHS, social care, and all things health policy and leadership.

What can be done about race inequality in the NHS workforce? How can we ensure representative leadership happens? Helen McKenna talks with Yvonne Coghill, Director at NHS England Workforce Race Equality Standard (WRES); Dionne Daniel, Project Lead, Nursing Workforce Remodelling Research Project; and Ben Morrin, Director of Workforce at University College London Hospitals.

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[King’s Fund Podcast] Working 9 to 5: Poppy Jaman on mental health and the work–life balance

The King’s Fund | February 2019 | Working 9 to 5: Poppy Jaman on mental health and the work–life balance

Experts from The King’s Fund and beyond about the NHS, social care, and all things health policy and leadership. This episode features Poppy Jaman OBE, Chief Executive of City Mental Health Alliance, who chats with Helen McKenna about mental health in the workplace, and shares her advice for future leaders.

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They consider: What should employers be doing to keep us well? And what language should we use when we talk about mental health?

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Stitcher

Spotify

Acast

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