Dignity in health care for people with learning disabilities

Dignity in health care for people with learning disabilities | The Royal College of Nursing  

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Image source: http://www.rcn.org.uk

This guidance aims to improve dignity in health care for people with learning disabilities.  It is designed particularly to support the nursing workforce but other health care and social care staff may find this useful.

The guidance concludes with information relating to the particular health needs that people with learning disabilities may have, and provides ideas on working in collaboration with other service providers.

Full guidance available here

Improving healthcare access for people with learning disabilities

Guidance for social care staff on how to help people with learning disabilities get better access to medical services to improve their health | Public Health England

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The health charter for social care and accompanying guidance provide information about the steps organisations and providers can take to improve the health and wellbeing of the people they support. There are practical tips as well as links to further information and useful resources.

There is also a self-assessment tool to enable organisations signed up to the health charter to measure progress and develop an action plan for improvements.

The series of short information sheets show social care staff how they can help people with learning disabilities to get better access to health services.

The documents can be accessed via Public Health England

Support for people with a learning disability

The Public Accounts Committee report, Local support for people with a learning disability, says greater focus is needed on measuring outcomes and improvements to quality of life.

Two years ago, the previous Committee of Public Accounts reported on the Department of Health’s efforts to move people with a learning disability out of mental health hospitals and into the community. At that time, the Committee found that progress had been poor but was promised improvements.

This follow up report finds the Transforming Care programme has moved some people out of hospital, however more needs to be done to address known barriers.  There is also concern that support for people with a learning disability who live in the community is patchy.

Health and Care of People with Learning Disabilities

The report identifies potential differences in the treatment, health status, and outcomes of people with learning disabilities compared with the rest of the population | NHS Digital

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It includes information on the percentage of patients known to their GP as having a learning disability who received an annual learning disability health check.

The report includes information on the percentage of eligible patients with a learning disability who had a flu immunisation or screening in 2014-15 and 2015-16 for:LD2

  • Breast cancer
  • Cervical cancer
  • Colorectal cancer

In addition to this, there is information on the life expectancy of people with learning disabilities, and the number of deaths in comparison with the same age and sex specific mortality rate as the general population in the same period.

The full interactive report is available here

 

Transformation fund call to bid

To support the implementation of the Five Year Forward View vision of better health, better patient care and improved NHS efficiency, NHS England has created a transformation fund | NHS England

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The interventions for which transformation funding are available are:

Sustainability and Transformation Plans (STPs) are central to this process and all bids should be explicitly linked to the relevant local STP plans. This process is open to any STP, although individual organisations or alliances may bid on behalf of an STP for this funding; submission of applications must be via STPs.

Read the full overview here

Transforming Care Must Know | Children’s and adults’ services

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Image source: gov.uk

The Transforming Care programme is based on the assumption that children, young people and adults with a learning disability and/or autism with behaviours described as challenging have the right to live satisfying and valued lives, and to be treated with dignity and respect. They should have a home within their community, be able to develop and maintain relationships, and get the support they need for a life that is healthy, safe and rewarding.

The Local Government Association is one of six national delivery partners (along with NHS England, the Department of Health, the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, the Care Quality Commission and Health Education England) supporting delivery of the programme through sector led improvement, including regional support to Transforming Care Partnerships.

Read the full report here

New app for adults with learning disabilities

New app, ‘My Health Guide‘ for adults with learning disabilities

My Health Guide is an app for iPads and Android tablets, as well as a web service, that puts adults with learning disabilities at the centre of their health care. The app enables people who struggle to communicate to have a voice, and to be empowered about their health care.

It lets adults with learning disabilities capture what’s important for them and helps them manage their health care. Families and friends can keep in touch using the web interface, and healthcare professionals can stay on top of what’s happening in the lives of learning-disabled adults.

The project is undergoing a 6-month trial in 2016 with 200 people at Humber NHS Foundation Trust.

The free app is available to download via iTunes or at Google Play .

This short introductory video for My Health Guide app owners (and potential owners) will help them understand what My Health Guide is, why it’s useful, and how it can help them: