A Fair, Supportive Society: Summary Report

Institute of Health Equity | November 2018 | A Fair, Supportive Society: Summary Report

The Institute of Health Equity (IHE) report A Fair, Supportive Society highlights that some of the most vulnerable people in society – those with learning disabilities – will die 15-20 years sooner on average than the general population – that’s 1,200 people every year.

instituteofhealthequity.org
Image source: A Fair, Supportive Society: Summary Report

The report commissioned by NHS England highlights key facts, stats, and interventions. Much of the government action needed to improve life expectancy for people with disabilities is likely to reduce health inequalities for everyone. Action should focus on the ‘social determinants of health’, particularly addressing poverty, poor housing, discrimination and bullying.

 

Shocking new report on children with learning disabilities: Half aren’t diagnosed in
childhood; those who are won’t collect their pension [press release]

Living together in a fair way [easy read]

Are we failing people with learning disabilities? A fair, supportive society: summary report

University College London | November 2018 |Are we failing people with learning disabilities?

A new report published by UCL’s Institute of Health Equity (IHE) highlights that  40 per cent of children with a learning disability remain undiagnosed and that adults with learning disabilities will die 15-20 years earlier (on average) than the general population which is 1,200 premature deaths each year.

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Responding to the findings Sir Michael Marmot , director of IHE said:

“This is a direct result of a political choice that destines this vulnerable group to experience some of the worst of what society has to offer: low incomes, no work, poor housing, social isolation and loneliness, bullying and abuse.

“A staggering 40% of people with learning difficulties aren’t even diagnosed in childhood. This is an avoidable sign of a society failing to be fair and supportive to its most vulnerable members. We need to change this. The time to act is now.”

The IHE makes a number of actions and 11 recommendations to improve life expectancy for people with disabilities.  (Source: UCL)

Read the IHE paper 

Easy read version 
In the media:

Guardian Two in five people with learning disabilities not diagnosed in childhood

Government response to the Learning Disabilities Mortality Review (LeDeR) Programme 2nd annual report

Department of Health and Social Care and NHS England| September 2018  |Government response to the Learning Disabilities Mortality Review (LeDeR) Programme 2nd annual report

This policy paper sets out a plan for action for the recommendations of the LeDeR 2nd annual report. The LeDeR 2nd annual report was published earlier this year (May 2018). It gave 9 recommendations based on the evidence from 103 reviews of deaths of people with learning disabilities undertaken between July 2016 and November 2017.

The actions will help address the inequality in life expectancy between people with learning disabilities and the wider population by ensuring that staff supporting people with a learning disability understand their needs and can make adjustments to the way care is provided, to help people reach their full potential (.

The government response to the Learning Disabilities Mortality Review (LeDeR) Programme 2nd annual report

Easy read: a response to the LeDeR report on deaths of people with learning disabilities

‘So what, what next?’ project to support people with autism, a learning disability or both

Local Government Association | August 2018 | The ‘So what, what next?’ project: supporting people with a learning disability, autism or both to use their skills and interests to play a part in the community

A project designed by the Transforming Care empowerment steering group to look at ways of supporting people with a learning disability or autism who have recently been discharged from hospital to explore their skills and passions and to find ways to contribute these to their local communities.

so what
Image source: local.gov.uk

The focus was on supporting people to use their strengths, become active citizens and to grow their independence. You can read the project report here, including ‘top tips’ for professionals and supporters (Source: Local Government Association).

Read the press release from the Local Government Association here 

Learning disability care could return to ‘Victorian era’ because of nurse training cuts, experts warn

The Independent | August 2018 | Learning disability care could return to ‘Victorian era’ because of nurse training cuts, experts warn

A new article in The Independent highlights the shortage of specialist nurses, such as learning disability nurses who provide specialist care in the community and in some acute trusts.

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Director of nursing, policy and practice at the Royal College of Nursing, Dame Donna Kinnair said: “The nursing shortage in England is harming some of the most vulnerable members of society.

“Those with learning disabilities already face a lower life expectancy and poorer health outcomes than the general population, and a lack of specialist knowledge will make matters worse.

Read the full news story at  The Independent 

Learning disabilities and CQC inspection reports

Public Health England | July 2018 | Learning disabilities and CQC inspection reports

 

 

 

 

 

The learning disability improvement standards for NHS trusts

NHS Improvement | June 2018 | The learning disability improvement standards for NHS trusts

NHS Improvement have developed new standards which have been developed with a number of outcomes created by people and families — which clearly state what they expect from the NHS. By taking this approach to quality improvement, it places patient and carer experience as the primary objective, as well as recognising the importance of how the NHS listens, learns and responds in order to improve care.

Better standards of care
Image source: improvement.nhs.uk

There are four standards, which include:

  • respecting and protecting rights
  • inclusion and engagement
  • workforce
  • learning disability services standard (aimed solely at specialist mental health trusts providing care to people with learning disabilities, autism or both)

Source: NHS Improvement 
The learning  disability improvement standards for NHS trusts

Easy read version: the learning disability improvement standards for NHS trusts