COVID-19: supporting adults with learning disabilities and autistic adults #covid19rftlks

Guidance for care staff who are supporting adults with learning disabilities and autistic adults during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak | Department of Health and Social Care

This guidance is for care workers and personal assistants who support adults with learning disabilities and autistic adults. The guidance will help care staff to:

  • keep people with learning disabilities and autistic people safe
  • support them to understand the changes they need to make during the COVID-19 outbreak
  • protect their own wellbeing

Full document: Coronavirus (COVID-19): guidance for care staff supporting adults with learning disabilities and autistic adults

See also: Coronavirus (COVID-19): providing unpaid care to adults with learning disabilities and autistic adults: Guidance for people who are providing unpaid care to adults with learning disabilities and autistic adults during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.

Preventing falls in people with learning disabilities

Public Health England | August 2019 | Preventing falls in people with learning disabilities

Public Health England (PHE) have produced a new guide to help public health, health professionals, paid social care staff and family members to prevent falls in people with learning disabilities.

Preventing falls in people with learning disabilities contains information to help staff in public health, health services and social care to prevent falls in people with learning disabilities. It is also intended to help falls prevention services to provide support that is accessible to people with learning disabilities. The guide aims to be of use to family carers, friends and paid support staff to help them think about what risks may contribute to falls and how to reduce such risks (Source: PHE).

Read the guide online from PHE

Helping doctors and nurses to improve care for patients with a learning disability

NHS Digital | August 2019 | Helping doctors and nurses to improve care for patients with a learning disability

NHS Digital have produced Helping doctors and nurses to improve care for patients with a learning disability to help  public health, health professionals, paid social care staff and family members to prevent falls in people with learning disabilities (Source: NHS Digital).

The full document is available from NHS Digital

 

Centre for Mental Health publication: In ten years’ time

The Centre for Mental Health | June 2019 | In ten years’ time

The Centre for Mental Health are calling on the government to strengthen the law so that anyone being considered for a prison sentence must have a relevant up to date pre-sentence report before a court can imprison them.

centreformentalhealth.org.uk
Image source: centreformentalhealth.org.uk

A recent independent poll commissioned by Revolving Doors Agency shows that public expect much better from our criminal justice system:

  • 76% of people think that magistrates should know whether someone has a mental health condition before sentencing them
  • 68% of people think that magistrates should know whether someone has a learning disability before sentencing them.

Full details from The Centre for Mental Health

In ten years’ time PDF

Celebrate Me: Capturing the voices of learning disability nurses and people who use services

Foundation of Nursing Studies | June 2019| Celebrate Me Capturing the voices of learning disability nurses and people who use services

Celebrate Me Capturing the voices of learning disability nurses and people who use services celebrates the impact of learning disability (LD) nursing and what the Foundation of Nursing Studies (FoNS)  should be championing for the future (to sustain LD nursing). The report includes engagement activities and more details via words
and graphic art, representing what people shared and contributed.

fons.org
Image source: fons.org

Full details from Foundation of Nursing Studies

 

 

Interim report: Review of restraint, prolonged seclusion and segregation for people with a mental health problem, a learning disability and or autism

Care Quality Commission | May 2019 | Interim report: Review of restraint, prolonged seclusion and segregation for people with a mental health problem, a learning disability and or autism

This report from the Care Quality Commission (CQC) gives the interim findings from our review of the use of restrictive interventions in places that provide care for people with mental health problems, a learning disability and/or autism.

cqc.org.uk
Image source: cqc.org.uk

The interim report shares findings from the CQC’s visits to 35 wards (assessing the care of 39 people), alongside information gathered from a request sent to 92 registered providers of services for people with a mental health problem, a learning disability and or autism. The report outlines the CQC’s preliminary findings.

What the CQC found on their visits:

  • Many people the CQC visited had been communicating their distress and needs in a way that people may find challenging since childhood, and services were unable to meet their needs.
  • A high proportion of people in segregation had autism.
  • Some of the wards did not have a built environment that was suitable for people with autism.
  • Many staff lacked the necessary training and skills.
  • Several people that we have visited were not receiving high quality care and treatment.
  • In the case of 26 of the 39 people, staff had stopped attempting to reintegrate them back onto the main ward. This was usually because of concerns about violence and aggression.
  • Some people were experiencing delayed discharge from hospital, and so prolonged time in segregation, due to there being no suitable package of care available in a non-hospital setting.

The interim report focuses exclusively on the experience of those people cared for in segregation on a mental health ward for children and young people or on a ward for people with a learning disability or autism. It makes a number of recommendations for the health and care system, including CQC.

OverviewAt the end of 2018, Matt Hancock, the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, asked us to look at the use of restrictive interventions.

This interim report focuses on 39 people who are cared for in segregation on a learning disability ward or a mental health ward for children and young people (Source: CQC).

Full details from CQC

[Interim report] Segregation in mental health wards for children and young people and in wards for people with a learning disability or autism

[Interim report easy read] How hospitals separate children and young people
who have a mental health problem or a learning disability or autism 

See also:

CQC [press release] CQC calls for action to fix the closed system that leads to people with a learning disability or autism being segregated in hospital

Children’s Commissioner Report: Children with learning disabilities or autism living in mental health hospitals

Children’s Commissioner | May 2019 | Children with learning disabilities or autism living in mental health hospitals

A new report from the Children’s Commissioner finds that children with learning disabilities or autism living in mental health hospitals. Far less than they deserve find shocking evidence of poor and restrictive practices and sedation, with some children telling the Children’s Commissioner of how their stay in mental health hospital has been traumatic, and parents too often left feeling powerless to do anything to intervene.

childrenscommissioner.gov.uk
Image source: childrenscommissioner.gov.uk

Key statistics:

  • 250 children with a learning disability or autism in a mental health hospital in England
  • 6 months is the average time children with autism and/or a learning disability had spent in their current hospital
  •  95 children were staying in a ward 31 miles away from home
  • A quarter of children did not appear to have had a formal review of their care plan within the last 26 weeks

Far less than they deserve 

See also:

Children’s Commissioner [press release] Many vulnerable children with learning disabilities are stuck in mental health hospitals for too long in poor conditions

Psychotropic drugs and people with learning disabilities or autism

Public Health England | March 2019 |Psychotropic drugs and people with learning disabilities or autism

Guidance from Public Health England (PHE) describes a system to track prescribing of antipsychotics, antidepressants and other psychotropics for people with learning disabilities, autism or both.

NHS England commissioned the study by NHS England to devise a method to report the impact of their programme to stop overmedication for people with learning disabilities, autism or both (STOMP). It provides data about the extent and trends in the use of psychotropic drugs between January 2010 and December 2017 (Source: Public Health England).

Further information about the study is available from PHE 

The guidance can be read online at PHE