COVID-19: guidance on supporting children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing

Advice for parents and carers on looking after the mental health and wellbeing of children or young people during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak | Public Health England

This advice is to help adults with caring responsibilities look after the mental health and wellbeing of children or young people, including those with additional needs and disabilities, during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak.

Full detail: Guidance for parents and carers on supporting children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak

Looking after your mental health during the Coronavirus outbreak

Mental Health Foundation | March 2020| Looking after your mental health during the Coronavirus outbreak coronavirus information 

Infectious disease outbreaks, like the current Coronavirus (COVID-19), can be scary and can affect our mental health. While it is important to stay informed, there are also many things we can do to support and manage our wellbeing during such times. The Mental Health Foundation has produced tips that they hope will help you, your friends and your family to look after your mental health at a time when there is much discussion of potential threats to our physical health (Source: Mental Health Foundation).

mentalhealth.org.uk
Image source: mentalhealth.org.uk

Information available from the Mental Health Foundation

 

Housing for people with mental health problems

Supported Housing: Improving outcomes in mental health patient pathways | NHS Confederation

The NHS Confederation has published Supported housing: improving outcomes in mental health patient pathways. The briefing explores the impact that high-quality supported housing for people with mental health problems can have on patient outcomes, the entire patient pathway and NHS finances. It also looks at the current context in mental health services, and the opportunities and barriers that exist to implementing more high-quality supported housing.

house-1353389_1920

Key points

  • To free up inpatient beds and reduce out-of-area placements, specialised supported housing for people with a mental illness must be implemented at scale.
  • The NHS Long Term Plan’s ambition to boost out-of-hospital care could be jeopardised if good quality supported housing is not embedded into clinical pathways.
  • Areas that have innovatively used the estates, capital and workforce available within many housing providers, and built strong partnerships between the NHS and third sector, have seen the lives of people with severe mental illness transformed.
  • Integrated care systems, primary care networks and provider collaboratives should seek the active engagement of supported housing organisations.
  • Greater understanding of the importance of funding streams, estates, relationships between sectors, types of care provided, and evaluation of services is needed to set up successful supported housing services.

The publication will be useful to all those with an interest in improving the care of people with severe mental health issues, including clinicians, managers, commissioners, policymakers and politicians.

Full document: Supported Housing: Improving outcomes in mental health patient pathways

Racial disparities in mental health

The Race Equality Foundation has published a report on the persistent racial disparities in mental health. The work draws on the most recent published research from the last five years together with insights from two events and conversations across the sector. 

racial
Image source: https://raceequalityfoundation.org.uk/

The report covers:

  • Prevalence
  • Access
  • Assessment
  • Treatment
  • Recovery

The literature review  identifies some causative factors and practice that could help
to address the disparities and improve experiences and outcomes for black and minority ethnic communities.

The authors suggest Commissioning needs to understand both the persistent nature of these inequalities, and that there are ways to address them. The collection and quality of data must be improved in order to improve evidence-based policies and interventions, particularly with regards to intersections of ethnicity, race, faith, disability, sexual orientation and gender identity.

In turn this may lead to a greater focus on prevention through understanding and addressing the wider determinants of health. The report also sets out recommendations to health agencies, professionals and the voluntary sector.

Full report: Racial disparities in mental health: Literature and evidence review

Mental health rehabilitation

In sight and in mind: making good on the promise of mental health rehabilitation | Rethink Mental Illness | The Royal College of Psychiatrists

This report summarises responses to Freedom of Information requests and discussions with clinicians, patients and carers regarding the current provision of mental health rehabilitation services across England and the use of out-of-area care for people who require these services.  The report identifies gaps in the system and outlines priorities for change and how to achieve them.

Full document: In sight and in mind: making good on the promise of mental health rehabilitation

 

Smoking and mental health

This edition of Health Matters focuses on smoking among people living with a broad range of mental health conditions | Public Health England

This resource focuses on smoking among people living with a broad range of mental health conditions, ranging from low mood and common conditions such as depression and anxiety, to more severe conditions such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Full detail: Smoking and mental health

Tackling social inequalities to reduce mental health problems

This report describes the extent of inequalities that contribute to poor mental health in the UK today. It explains how certain circumstances interact with our individual risk and discusses communities that are facing vulnerabilities | Mental Health Foundation

flourish
Image source: https://www.mentalhealth.org.uk/

For centuries, mental ill-health has been overlooked, misunderstood, stigmatised and, for a long time, inappropriately treated. Much of this is now changing, although misunderstanding and stigma are not yet things of the past.

As a society, we have some way to go before the extent of mental health problems and their damage to our individual and collective wellbeing is fully recognised and comprehensively responded to. The authors of this report argue that reducing mental health problems and their effects warrants the most urgent and committed public health effort of our generation.

 

As this paper will show, addressing social, economic, cultural and environmental inequalities will take us a long way towards achieving this goal. It makes a clearly evidenced case for why addressing inequalities can help to reduce the prevalence of mental health problems and makes a strong call for cross-sectoral action on mental health. The report concludes with proposed actions to address mental health inequalities.

Full report: Tackling social inequalities to reduce mental health problems: How everyone can flourish equally | Mental Health Foundation