Staff praised as NHS productivity grows more than twice as fast as wider economy

NHS England | April 2019 | Staff praised as NHS productivity grows more than twice as fast as wider economy

Analysis of data by a team of  researchers at the University of York’s Centre for Health Economics, suggests that NHS staff provided 16.5% more care pound for pound in 2016/17 than they did in 2004/05, compared to productivity growth of only 6.7% in the economy as a whole. Their findings show that productivity in the NHS has increased at a rate faster than the the wider economy during the last 12 years, meaning more care and treatments for patients and better value for taxpayers.

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Productivity of the English National Health Service: 2016/17 Update, revealed NHS outputs have increased since they began tracking productivity more than a decade ago.

According to NHS England this publication research reinforces figures published by the Office for National Statistics in January, which showed that NHS productivity in England in 2016/17 grew by 3% from the previous year, more than treble the 0.8% achieved by the whole economy (Source: NHS England).

Full details from NHS England

The publication Productivity of the English National Health Service: 2016/17 Update is available from the  University of York

In the news:

The Independent ‘Inefficient’ NHS has seen productivity grow twice as fast as the economy

Daily Mail Number of patients seen by hospitals rockets by five MILLION annually in 15 years as NHS demand reaches breaking point, study shows

Key areas for action on the health and care workforce

Closing the gap: Key areas for action on the health and care workforce | Nuffield Trust |  The King’s Fund | The Health Foundation

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Staffing is the make-or-break issue for the NHS in England. Workforce shortages are already having a direct impact on patient care and staff experience. This report calls for urgent action to avoid a vicious cycle of growing shortages and declining quality. The workforce implementation plan to be published later this year presents a pivotal opportunity to do this.

In this report, experts from the Nuffield Trust, The King’s Fund and the Health Foundation set out a series of policy actions that, evidence suggests, should be at the heart of the workforce implementation plan. This report focuses on nursing and general practice, where the workforce problems are particularly severe. The authors suggest a number of high-impact policy actions which, if properly funded and well implemented across the NHS would over time create a sustainable model for general practice and help to eliminate nursing shortages. These will require investment of an extra £900 million per year by 2023/24 into the budget of Health Education England.

Closing the gap: Key areas for action on the health and care workforce – full report

Closing the gap: Key areas for action on the health and care workforce – overview

See also: Offer £5,200 grants to nursing students and ramp up overseas recruitment to stop NHS workforce crisis | The Kings Fund

 

Labour market change and the international mobility of health workers

The Health Foundation | March 2019 | Labour market change and the international mobility of health workers

A new publication from The Health Foundation looks at the healthcare wokforce: exploring the migration and mobility of health workers. It also summarises the international health care labour market, and discusses policy options to respond to a growing need for health workers (Source: Health Foundation). 
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No country is an island UK and international health workforce mobility

See also Health Foundation Labour market change and the international mobility of health workers

Wider public health workforce review: 2018 to 2019

Public Health England | February 2019 |Wider public health workforce review: 2018 to 2019

Public Health England (PHE) has released a report on the wider public health workforce – across healthcare, social care, emergency services, VCSE, education, employment, criminal justice, housing and planning. The report-Wider public health workforce review: 2018 to 2019- details the findings of Public Health England’s 2018 to 2019 review of the wider public health workforce.

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The report identifies 3 broad categories of work completed by the wider public health workforce:

  • leading and advocating for health
  • influencing the wider determinants of health
  • direct contact with individuals and communities

It reports on progress to date to engage and develop the wider public health workforce across a range of sectors:

  • healthcare
  • social care
  • emergency services
  • VCSE
  • education
  • employment
  • criminal justice
  • housing
  • planning

Wider public health workforce review: 2018 to 2019

Further details from PHE 

 

Race equality in the NHS workforce

This podcast explores big ideas in health and care, and features experts from The King’s Fund and beyond discussing the NHS, social care, and all things health policy and leadership.

What can be done about race inequality in the NHS workforce? How can we ensure representative leadership happens? Helen McKenna talks with Yvonne Coghill, Director at NHS England Workforce Race Equality Standard (WRES); Dionne Daniel, Project Lead, Nursing Workforce Remodelling Research Project; and Ben Morrin, Director of Workforce at University College London Hospitals.

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Brexit: the implications for health and social care

Brexit has major implications for health and social care in England. In this ‘long read’, the Kings Fund looks at some of the latest developments that could impact the health and care system in England.

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The deadline of 29 March 2019, set when Article 50 was triggered, is rapidly approaching but many important issues are still to be resolved. Brexit has already had an impact, especially on the recruitment and retention of EU nationals in some parts of the workforce which is contributing to shortages of key staff. In addition, the ongoing debate in parliament and uncertainty about whether a deal can be agreed mean considerable work has gone into preparations for a no-deal Brexit.

The Department of Health and Social Care has published guidance for organisations to prepare contingency plans and has established a national operational response centre to lead on responding to any disruption to the delivery of health and care services.

This long read, originally written by Helen McKenna and published on 13 December 2017, has been updated by Beccy Baird on 22 February 2019 and explores the following topics:

  • Staffing
  • Accessing treatment
  • Regulation
  • Cross-border co-operation
  • Funding and finance

Full detail at the Kings Fund