Each Baby Counts

Each Baby Counts 2015 | The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

In the UK, each year over 1000 babies die or are left with severe brain injury because something goes wrong during labour.

Each Baby Counts is the RCOG’s national quality improvement programme to reduce the number of babies who die or are left severely disabled as a result of such incidents occurring during term labour.

The report presents key findings and recommendations based on the analysis of complete data relating to term stillbirths, neonatal deaths and babies with brain injuries born during 2015, the first full year of the programme.

Full report: Each baby counts

 

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New figures show an increase in numbers of nurses and midwives leaving the professions

New figures show an increase in the number of nurses and midwives leaving our register while at the same time, numbers joining have slowed down. This has resulted in an overall reduction in the numbers of nurses and midwives registered to work in the UK | NMC

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Image source: Danni Atherton – Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Recently public attention has focused on the reducing number of EU nurses and midwives joining our register. But today’s figures show that it is mainly UK nurses and midwives who are leaving the register, resulting in the overall downward trend.

For the first time in recent history the numbers leaving are now outstripping the numbers joining with this trend most pronounced for UK nurses and midwives who make up around 85 per cent of the register. Between 2016 and 2017, 45 per cent more UK registrants left the register than joined it for the first time.

Data also seems to show that more nurses and midwives are leaving the register before retirement age with a noticeable increase in those aged under 40 leaving.

Earlier this month we conducted a survey of more than 4,500 nurses and midwives who left the register over the previous 12 months. Excluding retirement, the top reasons given included working conditions, (including issues such as staffing levels), a change in personal circumstances (such as ill health or caring responsibilities) and a disillusionment with the quality of care provided to patients

Principles of Consent: New guidance for nursing staff

This document aims to provide information to registered nurses and other nursing staff to guide their practice around consent | RCN

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Image source: RCN

Consent is defined as “permission for something to happen or agreement to do something” (Oxford English Dictionary). In relation to health care, it is a general legal and ethical principle that valid consent must be obtained before commencing an examination, starting treatment or physical investigation, or providing care. This principle reflects the rights of a person to determine what happens to their own bodies or what shapes the care and support they receive. It is fundamental to good practice. The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) professional practice document for nurses and midwives, The Code (NMC, 2015a) states that registered nurses must:

(4.1) “balance the need to act in the best interests of all people at all times with the requirement to respect a person’s right to accept or refuse treatment”, and

(4.2) “make sure that you get properly informed consent and document it before carrying out any action”.

Registered nurses who do not respect this principle may be liable to both legal action by the person in their care and action by the NMC.

The requirement to gain consent has two purposes, one legal and the other clinical (Richardson V, 2013). The legal purpose is to provide those delivering treatment with a defence to a criminal charge of assault or battery or a civil claim for damages for trespass to the person. The clinical purpose comes from the fact that in most cases the co-operation of the person and the person’s confidence in the treatment is a major factor in their consenting to the examination, treatment or physical investigation, or the provision of care.

From bursaries to gender balance: what needs to change in nursing?

Our expert panel took a constructive look at the state of nursing in the UK. Here are the best bits of the discussion | The Guardian Healthcare

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On International Nurses’ Day, we brought together a panel of students, qualified nurses and educators to answer readers’ questions on the state of the profession. After a drop in student applications following NHS bursary cuts; a post-Brexit exodus of EU staff; and a possible strike by the Royal College of Nursing, there was plenty to discuss. Here’s what we learned.

Enabling Professionalism In Nursing And Midwifery Practice

This guide is aimed at all nurses and midwives and sets out what professionalism can look like in everyday practice | Nursing and Midwifery Council

professionalism

Image source: NMC

Professionalism means something to everyone who works as a nurse or midwife. Being an inspiring role model working in the best interests of people in your care, regardless of what position you hold and where you deliver care, is what really brings practice and behaviour together in harmony.  This guide demonstrates how applying the values of the code of conduct should be at the centre of all nursing and midwifery practice. For employers, it identifies key principles which will help them to provide practice environments that support and encourage professionalism among nurses and midwives.

A-EQUIP midwifery supervision model

The model supports a continuous improvement process that builds personal and professional resilience, enhances quality of care and supports preparedness for appraisal and professional revalidation | NHS England

The ultimate aim of using the A-EQUIP model is that through staff empowerment and development, action to improve quality of care becomes an intrinsic part of everyone’s job, every day in all parts of the system.

With the help of midwives, the Local Supervising Authority national taskforce and the projects Editorial Board, ‘A-EQUIP Operational Guidance’ has been developed.

The guidance is in four parts:

  • Part one describes the impact of the legislative change on midwifery regulation and the changes to midwifery supervision
  • Part two describes the A-EQUIP model and its benefit to midwives and users of maternity services
  • Part three has a clinical focus. Case studies show how the model can be deployed to support staff working in clinical and non-clinical roles and the benefits of the model to the multidisciplinary team
  • Part four provides guidance for:
    • Midwives and providers of maternity services and describes key actions for maternity providers
    • CCGs
    • HEIs

Full guidance can be found here

Mindfulness training can reduce depression and anxiety among nurses

Hunter, L. (2017) BMJ Evidence-based Nursing. 20(2)

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Commentary on:

Implications for practice and research:

  • Mindfulness can help relieve symptoms of depression and anxiety among nurses and may improve patient care.

  • There is a need for future quantitative studies to measure the nurse-perceived benefits of mindfulness identified in qualitative research.

  • Mixed-methods reviews can help develop a more complete and clinically relevant understanding of a given topic.

Read the full commentary here

Read the original research article here