Routes into nursing

NHS Employers | August 2018| Routes into nursing

A new infographic relesased by NHS Employers highligts the different routes into nursing.  Until recently, the routes to developing registered nurses within the workforce have been limited, with the university degree being the main way to train this group of staff. 

The introduction of the nursing degree apprenticeship gives a new opportunity for employers to train nurses, while the creation of the new nursing associate role can help to be a bridge between healthcare assistants and graduate registered nurses. These new routes can create a confusing picture for employers and so we have created a resource to support you to make the most of the new and existing routes into nursing (Source: NHS Employers).

nurses
Image source: nhsemployers.org
The infographic is available to download from NHS Employers
See also

NHS Employers also provide an overview of the different routes, follow each link for further details:

New standards for nurses and midwives

NHS Employers | May 2018 | New standards for nurses and midwives

The nursing and midwifery council (NMC) has launched a new framework for the education and training of nurses and midwives, and new standards of proficiency that nurses will be required to meet before they can apply for registration. The new standards were updated yesterday.

standards
Image source: nmc.org.uk

The new standards represent the knowledge, skills and attributes that all future registered nurses must demonstrate to deliver safe, compassionate and effective nursing care. The framework for education and training sets out what nurses and midwives will need to know, and be able to do, by the time they apply for registration (NHS Employers).

They are available from the NMC 

NHS England pledges specialist mental health services for new mums in every part of the country

NHS England & NHS Improvement | The Perinatal Mental Health Care Pathways | May 2018

NHS England has confirmed that new and expectant mums will be able to access specialist perinatal mental health community services in every part of the country by April 2019. The second wave of community-perinatal is now being rolled out to areas of the country that are currently underserved; with full geographical coverage  anticipated.

This £23 million  funding forms part of a package of measures, altogether worth a total of £365m by 2021, to transform specialist perinatal services so that 30,000 additional women can access evidence based treatment that is closer to home and when they need it, through specialist community services and inpatient mother and baby units (NHS England).

The perinatal
Image source: england.nhs.uk

 

NHS England & NHS Improvement have published guidance to provide services with evidence on what works in perinatal mental health care, as well as case studies describing how areas are starting to make this a reality.

The full release can be read at NHS England 

The full guidance can be downloaded here

In the media:

BBC News Improved mental health care funding for new mums

The Guardian NHS to make perinatal mental health available across England

Specialist perinatal mental health community teams: maps

The Maternal Mental Health Alliance has published new maps showing access of pregnant women and new mothers to specialist perinatal mental health services which meet national guidelines.  The Royal College of Midwives press release states that there have been improvements in services since the last maps were produced in 2015 but 24% of pregnant women and new mums still do not have not access to specialist mental health services.

Increasing number of nurses and midwives leaving profession

Data published by the Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) shows there continues to be an increase in the number of nurses and midwives leaving its register over the last 12 months.

Overall, the number of nurses and midwives on the register has started to drop for the first time in a decade:

  • There were just under 690,000 nurses and midwives registered to work in the UK in September – over 1,600 less than there were the year before
  • The register showed just over 36,200 EU nurses and midwives – over 2,700 less than a year before
  • Over the last 12 months the number of UK graduates leaving the profession has increased by 9%
  • The number of nurses and midwives from Europe leaving the register has also increased by 67%
  • The number joining the register from the EU has dropped from 10,178 last year to 1,107 this year, a decrease of 89%

The NMC Register can be viewed here

nmc
Image source: www.nmc.org.uk

Related:

Each Baby Counts

Each Baby Counts 2015 | The Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

In the UK, each year over 1000 babies die or are left with severe brain injury because something goes wrong during labour.

Each Baby Counts is the RCOG’s national quality improvement programme to reduce the number of babies who die or are left severely disabled as a result of such incidents occurring during term labour.

The report presents key findings and recommendations based on the analysis of complete data relating to term stillbirths, neonatal deaths and babies with brain injuries born during 2015, the first full year of the programme.

Full report: Each baby counts

 

New figures show an increase in numbers of nurses and midwives leaving the professions

New figures show an increase in the number of nurses and midwives leaving our register while at the same time, numbers joining have slowed down. This has resulted in an overall reduction in the numbers of nurses and midwives registered to work in the UK | NMC

Letter of resignation
Image source: Danni Atherton – Flickr // CC BY 2.0

Recently public attention has focused on the reducing number of EU nurses and midwives joining our register. But today’s figures show that it is mainly UK nurses and midwives who are leaving the register, resulting in the overall downward trend.

For the first time in recent history the numbers leaving are now outstripping the numbers joining with this trend most pronounced for UK nurses and midwives who make up around 85 per cent of the register. Between 2016 and 2017, 45 per cent more UK registrants left the register than joined it for the first time.

Data also seems to show that more nurses and midwives are leaving the register before retirement age with a noticeable increase in those aged under 40 leaving.

Earlier this month we conducted a survey of more than 4,500 nurses and midwives who left the register over the previous 12 months. Excluding retirement, the top reasons given included working conditions, (including issues such as staffing levels), a change in personal circumstances (such as ill health or caring responsibilities) and a disillusionment with the quality of care provided to patients