From bursaries to gender balance: what needs to change in nursing?

Our expert panel took a constructive look at the state of nursing in the UK. Here are the best bits of the discussion | The Guardian Healthcare

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On International Nurses’ Day, we brought together a panel of students, qualified nurses and educators to answer readers’ questions on the state of the profession. After a drop in student applications following NHS bursary cuts; a post-Brexit exodus of EU staff; and a possible strike by the Royal College of Nursing, there was plenty to discuss. Here’s what we learned.

Enabling Professionalism In Nursing And Midwifery Practice

This guide is aimed at all nurses and midwives and sets out what professionalism can look like in everyday practice | Nursing and Midwifery Council

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Image source: NMC

Professionalism means something to everyone who works as a nurse or midwife. Being an inspiring role model working in the best interests of people in your care, regardless of what position you hold and where you deliver care, is what really brings practice and behaviour together in harmony.  This guide demonstrates how applying the values of the code of conduct should be at the centre of all nursing and midwifery practice. For employers, it identifies key principles which will help them to provide practice environments that support and encourage professionalism among nurses and midwives.

A-EQUIP midwifery supervision model

The model supports a continuous improvement process that builds personal and professional resilience, enhances quality of care and supports preparedness for appraisal and professional revalidation | NHS England

The ultimate aim of using the A-EQUIP model is that through staff empowerment and development, action to improve quality of care becomes an intrinsic part of everyone’s job, every day in all parts of the system.

With the help of midwives, the Local Supervising Authority national taskforce and the projects Editorial Board, ‘A-EQUIP Operational Guidance’ has been developed.

The guidance is in four parts:

  • Part one describes the impact of the legislative change on midwifery regulation and the changes to midwifery supervision
  • Part two describes the A-EQUIP model and its benefit to midwives and users of maternity services
  • Part three has a clinical focus. Case studies show how the model can be deployed to support staff working in clinical and non-clinical roles and the benefits of the model to the multidisciplinary team
  • Part four provides guidance for:
    • Midwives and providers of maternity services and describes key actions for maternity providers
    • CCGs
    • HEIs

Full guidance can be found here

Mindfulness training can reduce depression and anxiety among nurses

Hunter, L. (2017) BMJ Evidence-based Nursing. 20(2)

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Commentary on:

Implications for practice and research:

  • Mindfulness can help relieve symptoms of depression and anxiety among nurses and may improve patient care.

  • There is a need for future quantitative studies to measure the nurse-perceived benefits of mindfulness identified in qualitative research.

  • Mixed-methods reviews can help develop a more complete and clinically relevant understanding of a given topic.

Read the full commentary here

Read the original research article here

Updated revalidation standards and guidance

The Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC) has updated its revalidation standards and guidance in line with a planned review and stakeholder feedback | NHS Employers

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Key changes

All documents except the Code have been revised. The standards and guidance includes:
  • New examples of circumstances which would not count towards practice hours,
  • Changes in How to revalidate and the guidance sheet to explain why the reflective discussion partner must be a registrant and why the discussion must be a single discussion with one other person.
  • Changes to the continuing professional development (CPD) examples to clarify that CPD is separate and different from everyday learning.
  • An explanation on how confirmation differs from appraisal.
  • Amendments to the alternative support arrangements guidance sheet.

More detail at NHS Employers

Download the revised guidance documents via NMC

Transforming community care with digital technologies

Chris Gregory, head of clinical systems for LGSS Local Health and Care Shared Service explains how mobile solutions are transforming the work of community-based health teams | NHE

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As the IT provider to Northamptonshire Healthcare NHS FT, LGSS has been involved in delivering mobile working solutions to a number of community-based health teams, including health visitors and district nurses, and for providing similar solutions in local government.

The trend towards delivering care closer to home to meet both patient aspirations, and the need to deliver savings through the reduction of estate, means that increasing levels of flexible working are being demanded across the NHS. If done successfully, mobile working can help to deliver the type of service that patients tell us they would like from their health service.

As with many IT services we’ve had a few attempts at delivering practical mobile working solutions, each based on and constrained by the technology available at the time. Prior to our latest deployment, we asked staff what they needed from a mobile device. Overwhelmingly, those who responded wanted:

  • A small form factor: There is plenty of other equipment a district nurse needs to carry so devices need to be small, as light as possible and certainly no more awkward to carry than the files of paper notes previously used
  • Sufficient battery life to get through an entire working day
  • A fast start-up: Ensuring that as little of the precious contact time with the patient was spent waiting for the technology
  • Versatility: Multiple means of inputting data, suggesting the need for both touchscreen and keyboard input

Read the full article here

The power of reflection in nursing | via @EBNursingBMJ

The importance of reflection in nursing cannot be understated | by Lizzie Ette for the BMJ Evidence-Based Nursing blog

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The importance of reflection in nursing cannot be understated. It can be used on many levels; to reflect on a specific incident, a moment in time even, and the actions, thoughts and feelings associated with that moment, or can be used to help create an understanding of a more general time period, by breaking down, considering, analysing and critiquing the who, what, why, when and how of the events of that time ( Gibbs (1988),; Johns (1995) ; Driscoll (2007) ). It can be used to reflect on situations as they occur – reflection in action – and on events from the past – reflection on action (Schön, 1983). Additionally, it can be used to recognise new skills and articulate planned new approaches. All of these mechanisms are thought to improve a nurse’s practice.

However, some are critical of reflective practice in its current form. Rolfe (2014), for example, argues that reflective practice has had a disappointing impact upon nurse education and practice, suggesting that it is the poor interpretation and implementation of reflective practice that has resulted in this lack of progress. Likewise, Nelson (2012) suggests that the present wide acceptance of ‘institutionally governed’ reflection is ironic given Schön and other’s original intentions for the use of reflection.

Read the full blog post here