Impact of inadequate health literacy on patient satisfaction, healthcare utilization, and expenditures

Inadequate health literacy (HL) is associated with impaired healthcare choices leading to poor quality-of-care | Geriatric Nursing

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Our primary purpose was to estimate the prevalence of inadequate HL among two populations of AARP®Medicare Supplement insureds: sicker and healthier populations; to identify characteristics of inadequate HL; and to describe the impact on patient satisfaction, preventive services, healthcare utilization, and expenditures. Surveys were mailed to insureds in 10 states. Multivariate regression models were used to identify characteristics and adjust outcomes. Among respondents (N = 7334), 23% and 16% of sicker and healthier insureds, respectively, indicated inadequate HL. Characteristics of inadequate HL included male gender, older age, more comorbidities, and lower education. Inadequate HL was associated with lower patient satisfaction, lower preventive service compliance, higher healthcare utilization and expenditures. Inadequate HL is more common among older adults in poorer health, further compromising their health outcomes; thus they may benefit from expanded educational or additional care coordination interventions.

Full reference: MacLeod, S. et al. (2017) The impact of inadequate health literacy on patient satisfaction, healthcare utilization, and expenditures among older adults. Geriatric Nursing. Volume 38 (Issue 4) pp. 334–341

The care of older people in care homes

National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Themed Review: Advancing Care: Research with care homes

There are more than twice as many people living in care homes in England and Wales, than there are people staying in hospital. Yet we know far more about effective treatments in hospital and less about what works most effectively to improve care for older people in care homes. Research in care homes is a relatively new and emerging field.

Advancing Care provides an overview of recent NIHR research on improving the health and care of care home residents. It highlights current research taking place now and explores new approaches being developed in this important area.

The review brings together NIHR research on three themes relating to the care of older people in care homes: Living well – maintaining good health and quality of life, ageing well – managing long term conditions associated with ageing, and dying well – ensuring a good quality end of life. It features:

  • 23 published studies
  • 21 ongoing studies
  • Quotes from care home owners, managers, staff and researchers
  • Where next for care home research?

Pet dogs as promoters of wellbeing |by Alison While @KingsNursing

The rise in life expectancy requires strategies to enable healthy ageing and the promotion of a high quality of life in old age | British Journal of Community Nursing

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Poor mental health including depression and social isolation can blight older people’s lives. Despite the positive benefits of physical activity for both mental and physical health, only a minority of those over 65 years are attaining the recommended levels of physical activity. The evidence relating to the benefits of pet dogs as promoters of wellbeing is set out in this article, although meeting their care needs may place an additional strain on an older person and/or their carer who has limited resources and physical capabilities.

Full reference: While, A. (2017) Pet dogs as promoters of wellbeing. British Journal of Community Nursing. Vol. 22 (no. 7)

 

 

The state of adult social care services 2014 to 2017

The state of adult social care services 2014 to 2017 presents findings from the Care Quality Commission’s comprehensive programme of adult social care inspections.

The CQC has published its The state of adult social care services 2014 to 2017 report, which is the first time that such focused analysis on a national scale has been possible following the formal introduction of the CQC’s new regulatory regime for adult social care in 2014.

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Image source: http://www.cqc.org.uk

The report found that more than three-quarters of adult social care services were currently rated as ‘good’ (77%) and 2% were currently rated as ‘outstanding’.

However, there was considerable variation with nearly a fifth (19%) of services being rated as ‘requires improvement’ and 2% as ‘inadequate’ on ensuring residents are safe.

Age UK says these figures reveal a ‘Russian roulette’ for care and has urged the Government to make a much greater investment into care services.

The full report can be downloaded here

Related:

 

Start active, stay active

The Department of Health has produced a series of infographics as part of it’s ‘Start active, stay active’ series explaining the physical activity required to achieve general health benefits for different age ranges.

forest-662427_1920The following infographics relate to the report by the UK’s 4 Chief Medical Officers for the NHS, local authorities and a range of other organisations designing services to promote physical activity.

Physical activity for pregnant women

Physical activity benefits for babies and children (birth-5 years old)

Physical activity for children and young people (5-18 years old)

Physical activity benefits infographic for adults and older people

Person-centred care for older people in care homes

The Social Care Institute for Excellence has published  Person-centred care for older people in care homes

This resource covers the implications of the personalisation agenda for owners and managers of care homes. It summarises information, advice and guidance which will support care home owners and managers as they develop a person-centred (or personalised) approach to care in their homes.

The resource covers the following areas:

Download the full publication: Person-centred care for older people in care homes

Video: What is person-centred care?

 

The future burden of disability in the UK

2.8 million people over 65 will need nursing and social care by 2025 – largely because of a significant rise in dementia-related disability, research finds.

Research published by the Lancet Public Health medical journal says cases of disability related to dementia will rise by 40% among people aged 65 to 84, with other forms of disability increasing by about 31%.

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The investigators used a detailed model to produce estimates of the prevalence of disability due to cardiovascular disease, dementia, and other causes in people aged 65 years or older in England and Wales to the year 2025.

They found a 25% increase from 2015 in the number of older people who will be living with disability, representing 560 000 additional elderly people in England and Wales who will need care for their disabling condition, and showed that the largest relative increases will be in dementia cases.  They also predicted that although life expectancy among people older than 65 years will increase by 1·7 years, 0·7 of these years will be lived with disability.

Having identified these challenges, the authors have recommended increased capacity in formal social care and improved support for informal social care arrangements, along with enhanced interventions against predictable risk factors for non-communicable diseases disability, such as smoking, diet, and physical activity.

Full reference: Guzman-Castillo, Maria et al. | Forecasted trends in disability and life expectancy in England and Wales up to 2025: a modelling studyThe Lancet Public Health Published online 23rd May 2017