Health, ageing and support survey: 2017

Results of Ipsos MORI research into the views of people aged 50 or over on health, ageing and support for 2017 | Department of Health and Social Care

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This report provides the results from an Ipsos MORI survey of the views of people aged 50 or over on health, ageing and support. The survey was conducted on behalf of the Department of Health and Social Care, and fieldwork took place between 3 January and 19 February 2017.

Key findings:

  • People aged 50 and over are slightly less positive about their health than a year ago, but still take their physical and mental health seriously. Eating healthily is seen as important for both physical and mental health, though nearly half do not think a healthy lifestyle can prevent dementia.
  • Fewer people than last year say they would take to their GP if they were worried about their memory.
  • Loneliness continues to be seen as a big problem for older people and most think society is not doing enough to prevent it.
  • Views are less positive than a year ago about whether the government has the right policies about care and support services, and about whether care and support services work well with the NHS to provide co-ordinated care.
  • People continue to be more confident about the safety of older people in hospitals than in nursing or residential homes.
  • Concern about meeting the cost of care and support services has increased since last year. However, this has not translated into greater action and people are still not preparing substantially for the financial cost of care and support they might need.

This report is the second of 2 surveys. The first survey took place in 2016.

Full document: Health, ageing and support: survey of views of people aged 50 and over

Patient-centred care for older people with complex needs: Evaluation of a new care model in outer east London

The Nuffield Trust | April 2018 | Patient-centred care for older people with complex needs: Evaluation of a new care model in outer east London

Health 1000 is a new model of care that aimed to improve quality of life through personalised care delivered by a clinically-led multidisciplinary team, focusing on prevention and early intervention and supported by contributions from the third sector. Individuals eligible in Barking and Dagenham, Havering and Redbridge boroughs were invited to transfer from their primary care practice to Health 1000.

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Image source: nuffieldtrust.org.uk

Using a case-control methodology, where 407 patients registered with Health 1000 were paired with a control who would be registered with another GP in the area. A combination of interviews with patients and staff and surveys were completed by staff of Health 1000 and nearly 50 primary care staff working in the boroughs.
Among the findings were:

  • Staff had reported reductions in unnecessary outpatient referrals and significant improvements to medicines management. They had also referred to the benefits of better care continuity, for example in enabling quicker discharges from hospital and avoiding duplication across the system.
  • However, there is no evidence that the service reduced use of hospital services – whether for all patients, those who satisfied the original eligibility criteria, or those at end of life. However, with the numbers of patients and the period of follow up, it may be too soon to detect any such change.

The report’s key findings and the full details of the evaluation are available from The Nuffield Trust here 

The accompanying report can be downloaded here

Age UK report: ‘Why call it care when no one cares?’

  • Age UK |  2018 | Older people and their families tell politicians about the problems they face with care

A new report by Age UK – ‘Why call it care when no one cares?’ – summarises the results of a series of listening events the charity  held with older people who are receiving care and their family carers earlier this year. 127 people participated in 13 sessions in total, which took place in the North, Midlands and South of England, in urban and rural places, and in more affluent and poorer areas.

Each of the listening events, were hosted by local Age UKs and had two parts:

  • in the first older people and their family carers talked about their personal experiences of care, highlighted the problems they faced and what would make life better;
  • and in the second they discussed various funding proposals and what they would mean for them and their families.

Age UK designed these events to help policymakers understand the real-life issues facing older people in need of care and their family carers in their constituencies, and to provide an opportunity to discuss potential solutions.  There was much commonality in the issues raised, and the same issues featured throughout the country,  showing that the problems facing adult social care are national.

The top five reasons mentioned the most in the sessions:

1. ‘Too many professional carers are in a rush and there’s no continuity

2. ‘Care often it isn’t very good’

3. ‘Social care is very expensive and often not good value for money’

4. ‘We family carers feel abandoned and unsupported by the NHS and social care’

5. ‘The social care system is dysfunctional and navigating it is a nightmare’

Older people suggested possible solutions to these issues:

1. ‘Everyone should contribute in some way’

2. ‘We’re only willing to pay more if we get a better service in return’

3. ‘We want any extra funds that are raised to be ring-fenced for care’

4. ‘We believe we need a new and better contract with family carers in our society’

5. ‘We older people and our families desperately want security’ (Age UK)

The full news piece can be read at Age UK 

You can read the full Age UK report here 

 

Adding extra years to life and extra life to those years: local government guide to healthy ageing

Local Government Authority   | March 2018  | Adding extra years to life and extra life to those years Local government guide to healthy ageing

In the last decade the number of people living in England aged over 65 has increased by  20 per cent, which is equivalent to 1.7 million extra older people.  Life expectancy has risen: on average a 65 year old female can expect to live for around 21 further years, and for a male this is about 19 more years. The largest increase is in those aged over 85, where life expectancy has risen by almost a third. This trend is expected to continue in the coming years and to gather momentum.
According to the Local Government Authority (LGA) people living longer has  consequences for health and social care services as far too many of those later years are being spent in poor health. 

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Image source: local.gov.uk

This report includes 8 case studies ranging  from exercise classes in Haringey and Oxfordshire, to the council in Ealing helping to connect residents to reduce loneliness and tackle isolation. In addition Lancashire County Council have tackled falls in over 65s in a programme that has since been rolled across the country.

 

 

The full report can be downloaded from Local Government Authority here 

Ageing well is everyone’s business

NHS England  | March 2018  |Ageing well is everyone’s business

Professor Martin J Vernon, a  Consultant Geriatrician and Associate Head of Division for Medicine and Community Services in Manchester, reflects on how frailty, once seldom heard in mainstream innovative healthcare, has transformed into a key priority in supporting patients to age well. In 2017 the NHS in England became the first health system in the world to begin systematic identification of frailty in primary care (General practice) within the whole population of older people.

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Professor Vernon emphasises that frailty is not limited to older people and not all older people will develop it.  NHS England estimates that one in five of those aged 90 or over remain fit.  Equally the same data from Kent Integrated Data set suggests over a quarter of 65 to 69 year olds have mild frailty in England.

The full blog post is available at NHS England

There are also details about regional events  which showcase best practice examples which are working in the reality of the current health and care system.  They will look at how participants can take action to improve the quality of life and wellbeing for people living with frailty.  Full details from NHS England 

Substance misuse in older people

Our invisible addicts | The Royal College of Psychiatrists 

This report presents up-to-date evidence on the extent of substance-related health problems amongst older people and the services required to deal with the complexity of such problems which often involve co-morbid mental and physical health problems, polypharmacy and psychosocial adversity.

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Image source: http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk

The document seeks to build on the progress made over the past six years and to emphasise that including older people with substance problems in national policies is imperative and that there is a need for organisational reform to tackle this issue.

The authors consider and advocate the further development of a clinical workforce with the appropriate knowledge, skills and attitudes to provide identification, assessment, treatment, and assist in recovery and referral for substance misuse in an older population.

Included within the report are chapters on the following areas:

  • Public health and substance misuse in older people
  • Assessment of substance misuse
  • Treatment
  • Service delivery and development
  • Education and training
  • Ethical and legal considerations for older people with substance misuse

Full report: Our Invisible Addicts (2nd edition) 

Improving the experience of care and support for people using adult social care services

This guideline covers the care and support of adults receiving social care in their own homes, residential care and community settings | National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)

This NICE guideline aims to help people understand what care they can expect in residential and community settings, and to improve their experience by supporting them to make decisions about their care.

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The guideline has been developed by a committee of people who use services, and carers and professionals. It has used information from a review of research evidence about people’s experiences of care and support, and from expert witnesses. The committee also gave consideration to the potential resource impact of the recommendations. The recommendations are considered to be aspirational but achievable.

It includes recommendations on:

It is for:

  • Practitioners working in adult social care services in all settings.
  • Service managers and providers of adult social care services.
  • Commissioners of adult social care services.
  • People using services (including those who fund their own care) and their families, carers and advocates.

Full reference: People’s experience in adult social care services: improving the experience of care and support for people using adult social care services | NICE guideline [NG86]

See also:  NICE interactive flowchart – People’s experience in adult social care services