All.Can patient survey

All.Can UK | December 2018| First findings of All.Can patient survey revealed at UK Parliament event

More than a third (36 per cent) of cancer patients reported the greatest inefficiency as being their diagnosis finds the All. Can patient survey sought patients’ and carers’ perspectives on inefficiencies in cancer care.  40 per cent of people who participated in the survey had been initially diagnosed with something else. A similar proportion (34 per cent) also responded to say that they had a surplus of medication left over following treatment.

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All.Can worked with Quality Health to develop the patient survey. Quality Health was responsible for all aspects of survey administration and data analysis, with input from All.Can national initiatives and the international research and evidence working group.

The UK piloted the All.Can patient survey ahead of roll-out in other countries throughout 2018. The survey closed in the UK in August, but continued running until 30 November in Australia, Belgium, Canada, France, Italy, Poland, Spain and Sweden.  Data from an international version is also being analysed (Source: all-can.org).

Further details from All.Can

Advice line for GPs saves hours of travel for patients and £100k to be reinvested back into NHS

NHS England | November 2018 | Advice line for GPs saves hours of travel for patients and £100k to be reinvested back into NHS

The Walton Centre in Liverpool – the only specialist hospital trust in the UK dedicated to providing comprehensive neurology, neurosurgery, spinal and pain management services-   runs an advice line which means GPs in the Cheshire and Merseyside area can call neuro consultants for fast advice any weekday reducing extra patient appointments. 

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So far the service has received 181 calls 37% were resolved by the GP saving £51,698 which over a year saves around £100k.

Programme Director Julie Riley said: “We want to deliver services closer to home and when patients do come into hospital, support them so they can recover and go home quicker. From a patient point of view, we want to work in partnership with them. We, our consultant colleagues and GPs want to support them in self-management, where appropriate – rather than taking a paternalistic approach.”

Read the full case study at NHS England 

Technology in care

Care Quality Commission | November 2018 | Technology in care

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) have published a series – Technology in care- which shows how technology is used, the benefits of its usage and it also includes examples of best practice .

Introduction: How technology can support high-quality care

Using surveillance in your care service

Check the way you handle personal information meets the right standards

Find out if you need consent to use technology as part of someone’s care

 

Nutrition and hydration collaborative

NHS Improvement | October 2018 | Nutrition and hydration collaborative

NHS Improvement ran a 180-day programme, with 25 volunteer trusts, to improve nutritional care by increasing the accuracy of nutritional screening and the appropriateness of nutritional interventions.

The overall aims of the collaborative were to support trusts to:

  • increase in the proportion of patients with an accurate nutritional screen
  • increase in the proportion of patients receiving appropriate nutritional interventions
  • introduce and increase the use quality improvement tools and techniques

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In addition to these aims organisations could identify their own quality improvement focus if appropriate.

25 trusts volunteered to be part of the programme to drive quality improvements, each shared their good practice, what they have learnt about quality improvement and helpful techniques with each other.

Read the trust stories on the Nutrition collaborative 

Making hospitals safe for people with diabetes

Diabetes UK | October 2018 | Making hospitals safe for people with diabetes

The report from Diabetes UK has been created by an alliance of groups and individuals striving to improve hospital care for people with diabetes. Thorough engagement with diabetes inpatient teams, ward staff, people with diabetes and hospital management means we now understand the depth of the challenges facing the NHS in improving diabetes inpatient care. For their report, Diabetes UK visited
hospitals across the country to find out what works.

Making hospitals safe Diabetes UK

Image source: Diabetes.org.uk

The report outlines six points that the UK needs to make hospitals safer for people with diabetes.

  • multidisciplinary diabetes inpatient teams in all hospitals
  • strong clinical leadership from diabetes inpatient teams
  • knowledgeable healthcare professionals who understand diabetes
  • better support in hospitals for people to take ownership of their diabetes
  • better access to systems and technology
  • more support to help hospitals learn from mistakes.

The report outlines these points in more detail and highlights what needs to be in place in all acute hospitals across England to make sure every stay for someone with diabetes is safe.

The report’s recommendations are based on models from across the UK which have been shown to improve patient care (Source: Diabetes UK).

Simplifying research arrangements to improve patient care

NIHR | October 2018 | Simplifying research arrangements to improve patient care

From this month new arrangements are coming into place to better manage excess treatments costs in non-commercial research, as well as plans to reduce delays and improve commercial clinical research set up and reporting. This will simplify and improve research arrangements, which will ultimately improve future health and care for patients.

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This work follows a joint statement published by NHS England and the NIHR, committing to 12 actions to support and apply research in the NHS. In connection with this a public consultation was carried out by NHS England alongside partners including the NIHR, which centred around two of the twelve actions focusing on excess treatment costs and commercial clinical research (Source: NIHR).

Related: NHS England’s Research Needs Assessment 2018

 

Full details from NIHR Supporting and applying research in the NHS

Transforming care- Is it working?

BBC Radio 4| October 2018 | Transforming care is it working?

According to figures obtained and reported by BBC Radio 4, patients with learning disabilities are 50 per cent more likely to be physically restrained, despite ministers condemning their use.  File on 4 finds that a key milestone to reduce inpatient beds by by March 2019 and to transform the lives of people who have been previously been ‘stuck’ in institutional settings is in danger of being missed (BBC Radio 4). 

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Radio 4 Transforming Care- Is it working? The full episode is vailable on the BBCiPlayer Radio 

BBC News Shameful’ use of restraints on disabled patients

The Independent Restraint on adults with learning disabilities soars by nearly 50% in a year, figures show

See also: The Guardian Physical restraint used on 50% more NHS patients with learning disabilities