Communities and health

 

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This resource provides an overview of the different approaches to working with communities for improving health and illustrates the vital role that they have in improving health and wellbeing. The Kings Fund has produced this reading list for those who want to explore the topic of communities and health in more detail. 

The following questions and areas are examined:

  • What is a ‘community’?
  • What is the role of communities in improving health?
  • Health policy and the role of communities in health
  • Examples of community involvement in health

Full resource: Communities and Health | The Kings Fund

Lay members in the future of commissioning

NHS Clinical Commissioners has published the following documents which focus on the role that CCG lay members will play in the future of commissioning:

  • Supporting change in your NHS: the non-executive community in transformational change – summarises discussions held at two events earlier this year on the lay member and non-executive director (NED) role; insights on current system change and views on the next steps for lay members and NEDs
  • Checklist for professional development of CCG lay members – this is the third checklist looking at different aspects of the lay member role.  It covers appraisals, professional development, career development opportunities, and planning for the future.

Fifteen Steps Challenge: quality from a patient’s perspective

NHS England has published The Fifteen Steps Challenge: quality from a patient’s perspective: a guide for commissioners. This guide describes how commissioners can apply the 15 Steps Challenge to the services that they commission, resulting in higher quality care and effective patient engagement in the commissioning process.  There are also versions of this guide for acute inpatient settings, mental health settings, community settings, outpatients units, and children and young people’s inpatient units.

The value of patient organisations

The added value of patient organisations | The European Patients Forum

The objective of this report is to emphasise the contribution of patient organisations in representing and voicing the situation of a specific population that would otherwise not be represented.

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Image source: http://www.eu-patient.eu

Patient organisations are able to help policy-makers understand the experience of living with a disease or a condition. They use this ‘end-user perspective’ to promote the interests of patients at all stages of policy development and in a range of institutional settings.

The main activities of patient organisations are set out in four different areas: policy, capacity building and education, peer support and research & development (both health and pharmaceutical).

Full report: The added value of patient organisations

Measuring quality of health care in the NHS: Giving a voice to the patients

The high profile role that the NHS played in Brexit and recent general election campaigns demonstrates that the health care system remains foremost in the minds of all political parties when considering how to present their policies | The Health Foundation

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These campaigns put a spotlight on the sustainability of the health care system, but may have also fuelled a fear over deteriorating health system performance. In 2017, the NHS was recently ranked by the Commonwealth Fund as the best performing health care system out of 11 countries, including Germany, Australia and the United States. However, 82% of the general public expressed concerns about the future of the NHS in a survey following the 2017 General Election, with quality of care identified as one reason for dissatisfaction previously. Arguably, this disparity may be the result of intense media coverage of the human and financial pressures on the NHS, which could have shaped public perception to some extent. However, it might also point to a deeper disparity: a disconnect between the general assessment of measurable health system performance versus the quality of care perceived by patients when accessing the NHS.

One reason for this relates to the difficulty in measuring quality of health care at the system level. Quality in the context of health care is a multi-dimensional framework that captures six domains:

  • Effectiveness
  • Efficiency
  • Equity
  • Safety
  • Timeliness
  • Patient-centeredness.

Read the full blog post by Rocco Friebel here

Podcast: Implementing shared decision making in the NHS

Shared decision making requires a shift in attitudes at all levels but can become part of routine practice with the right support, say Natalie Joseph-Williams and colleagues | BMJ

Adoption of shared decision making into routine practice has been remarkably slow, despite 40 years of research and considerable policy support.12345678 In 2010, the Health Foundation in the UK commissioned the MAGIC (Making Good Decisions in Collaboration) programme to design, test, and identify the best ways to embed shared decision making into routine primary and secondary care using quality improvement methods

The learning from MAGIC derives from a variety of sources, including facilitated shared learning events, clinic and consultation observations, interviews with clinicians and patients, patient and public involvement panels, focus groups, and questionnaires. We assessed progress using “plan do study act” data collection tools monthly project team meetings (including researchers, clinical teams, healthcare organisations, and patient representatives), and an independent evaluation report of phase 1. Here, we draw on our learning from the three year programme and subsequent experience to summarise the key challenges of implementing shared decision making and to offer some practical solutions.

Read the full article here

Working with the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector

The Local Government Association has published Public health working with the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector: new opportunities and sustainable change.

The case studies in this report show how public health and the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector (VCSE) are working together to make a real difference to people’s health and wellbeing.

Download the full report here