Eating and drinking for a person with dementia

Helping a person with dementia to maintain a healthy diet can be difficult
for the people caring for them. This leaflet aims to provide some positive
tips on ways to help | Dementia UK

People with dementia may experience problems with eating and drinking.
There are many reasons this might happen. They might:

  • forget to eat
  • experience difficulties preparing food
  • have difficulty recognising food items
  • have a change in appetite or taste
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Image source: http://www.dementiauk.org

Eating a healthy and balanced diet is important for a person’s physical and mental health. Not eating and drinking enough can increase the risk of dehydration, weight loss, a urinary tract infection and constipation. These health problems can be particularly problematic for someone with dementia as they can increase confusion and the risks of delirium, and sometimes make the symptoms of dementia worse.

This leaflet from Dementia UK provides useful tips on the following:

  • Setting the scene for mealtimes
  • Encouraging a person with dementia to eat
  • Encouraging a person with dementia to drink
  • Stocking up and storing food
  • Weight gain or weight loss
  • Swallowing

Full resource: Eating and drinking: Staying well with dementia

Related:   ‘Eating and Drinking Well: Supporting People Living with Dementia’ |Bournemouth University

Patients’ right to choose where to receive care

NHS Partners Network has issued an infographic to raise awareness of  patients’ legal rights when choosing where to receive their NHS care.

  • You have the right to choose where you receive NHS treatment.
  • The right t o be referred to a different hospital if the wait is more than 2 weeks to see a specialist for suspected cancer
  • The right to be referred to a different hospital if the wait is more than 18 weeks for non-urgent treatment.
right
Image Source: NHS Confederation nhsconfed.org

 

NHS Confederation |You have the right to choose where you receive NHS treatment |February 2018

Cyber resilience in health and care

The Department of Health and Social Care has released an update on their work to strengthen cyber resilience across health and care

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In July 2017, the department of Health published Your Data: Better Security, Better Choice, Better Care in which it formally accepted the National Data Guardian’s 10 Data Security Standards.

As part of this, an implementation plan on securing data and cyber security was published. This set out how the department plans to deliver key data and cyber security actions. All actions set out in that plan have either been delivered or are in progress. This document summarises these actions.

Full document: Securing cyber resilience in health and care: progress update

NICE recommends GPs develop a national autism register

GPs could be asked to develop a national autism register to help end the ‘invisibility’ of autistic people in the health system | GP Online

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NICE has recommended the register be implemented with a new QOF indicator.

The proposal follows the findings of the Westminster Commission on Autism, set up by the National Children’s Group and chaired by Labour MP Barry Sheerman. Its report found that 76% of autistic people and parents said their GP did not make any reasonable adjustments for them or their autistic child. The report said this was an indication that health professionals may not consistently identify and make accommodations for the needs of autistic people.

NICE said a register would make autistic patients more easily identifiable to healthcare professionals in GP practices and help staff adapt their approach to suit patients’ needs.

For example, NICE said, it would allow staff to arrange for autistic children to come for vaccinations at quieter times and turn lights down for those with sensory problems.

Read the full news story here

GPs to refer patients to libraries to promote access to reliable health information

GPs will be able to refer patients with long-term conditions to public libraries from this month under a charity-led scheme to promote access to reliable health information | GP Online

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A reading list of 28 trusted books for patients with long-term conditions, stocked by all public libraries in England from this month, has been drawn up under the scheme, backed by the RCGP and organisations including Public Health England.

The books on prescription scheme for patients with long-term conditions is an extension of the existing Reading Well programme, launched by charity the Reading Agency and the Society of Chief Librarians.

Thousands of GPs already refer patients to libraries under the existing scheme, which has focused on areas including mental health and support for patients with dementia and their carers.

Report: Perfect Patient Information

Improving access to information: New PIF report – Perfect Patient Information Journey

PIF
Image source: PIF

In light of the growing move towards supporting people with long-term conditions to self-manage and share in decision-making about their care, PIF has launched a project aimed at creating a model pathway to support the ‘perfect patient information journey’ for people with long-term conditions.

The project aims to:

  • Identify good practice principles to ensure the provision of high quality information for people with long-term conditions.
  • Develop resources aimed at supporting patients, healthcare professionals and commissioners to better access, provide and commission high quality information.
  • Pilot and evaluate these resources in a clinical setting.

Read the full overview here

The full report is available here