Resources to support safer modification of food and drink

NHS Improvement | June 2018Resources to support safer modification of food and drink

NHS Improvement has  issued a resource alert to eliminate use of the imprecise term ‘soft diet’ and assist providers with safe transition to the International Dysphagia Diet Standardisation Initiative (IDDSI) framework, which introduces standard terminology to describe texture modification for food and drink.


Resources to support safer modification of food and drink are here

In the media:

BBC News Patients ‘choked on hospital soft food’

The Telegraph  Safety alert after hospital patients choke on hash browns and peas

Mail Online Hundreds of NHS patients have choked, with two DYING, after being fed solid food when it should have been minced or puréed because they had difficulty swallowing, reveals damning report

Community pharmacies in England providing improved asthma and dementia care, NHS England figures show

NHS England | Improved asthma and dementia care from community pharmacists under new quality scheme |

Since April 2017, over 97 per cent of pharmacies – 11,410 out of approximately 11,700 – took part in the The Quality Payments Scheme, this  provides an incentive to deliver new clinical services, to encourage more people to use their local pharmacist.

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The scheme had three key foci:

  •  patient safety
  • patient experience
  • clinical effectiveness

Over 12,500 asthma patients at high risk of suffering a severe asthma attack have been identified and referred for a full asthma review, whilst 70,000 pharmacy staff have become ‘Dementia Friends’ in order to offer greater awareness regarding the needs of people with dementia. ​
The scheme ran between December 2016 and March 2018,  NHS England is currently considering how best to implement the successes of this scheme over the long-term.

The full details are available from NHS England 

Revised Never Events policy and framework

The Never Events policy and framework sets out the NHS’s policy on Never Events. It explains what they are and how staff providing and commissioning NHS-funded services should identify, investigate and manage the response to them.

Never Events are serious incidents that are entirely preventable because guidance or safety recommendations providing strong systemic protective barriers are available at a national level, and should have been implemented by all healthcare providers.

The main changes to the revised policy and framework are:

  • the removal of the option for commissioners to impose financial sanctions on trusts reporting Never Events
  • to align the Never Events policy and framework with the Serious Incident framework, to achieve consistency across the two documents (a revised Serious Incident framework will be published later in 2018)
  • revisions to the list of Never Events, including two additional types of Never Event.

Full document: Never Events policy and framework – revised January 2018

See also: Never Events list 2018

 

Urgent and emergency care: best practice

This CQC report offers practical examples of how leading emergency departments are meeting the challenges of managing capacity and demand, and managing risks to patient safety .

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This report from the Care Quality Commission details the good practice identified following the Commission’s work with consultants, clinical leads, senior nursing staff and managers from leading emergency departments in 17 NHS acute trusts.

This resource identifies:

  • strategies staff use to meet the challenge of increased demand and manage risks to patient safety
  • positive actions to address potential safety risks and to manage increased demand better
  • how working with others can manage patient flow and ensure patients get the care they need
  • that rising demand pressures in emergency departments are an issue for the whole hospital and local health economy.

Full report: Sharing best practice from clinical leaders in emergency departments

National Audit of Inpatient Falls

The National Audit of Inpatient Falls (NAIF) is designed to capture data from acute, community and mental health hospitals relating to falls | Royal College of Physicians

This report provides:

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Image source: http://www.rcplondon.ac.uk
  • aggregated national results for the organisational aspects of leadership responsibilities, policies and procedures, highlighting deficiencies and changes since 2015
  • aggregated national averages for the clinical audit items, focusing on change since 2015, particularly where little progress has been made overall, or where there is a large variation in what has been achieved
  • detailed results from all individual hospitals, enabling comparison with their own performance in 2015, their performance against the guidance standards and a comparison with other hospitals.

Full report:  NAIF audit report 2017

Nine in 10 GPs rated good or outstanding following CQC inspection

Care Quality Commission (CQC) report finds that at the end of its first inspection programme of general practices 4% were rated ‘outstanding’, 86% were ‘good’, 8% were ‘requires improvement’ and 2% were ‘inadequate’.

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Image source: http://www.cqc.org.uk

The state of care in general practice 2014 to 2017 presents findings from CQCs  programme of inspections of GP practices. This detailed analysis of the quality and safety of general medical practice in England has found that nearly 90% of general practices in England have been rated as ‘good’, making this the highest performing sector CQC regulates.

Full document: The state of care in general practice 2014 to 2017