NHS patients willing to pay more tax to improve services

More than four in five of NHS users would be willing to pay more tax to secure significant improvements to the service, according to a new poll commissioned by the NHS Confederation | story via OnMedica

The Ipsos MORI poll surveyed 1,003 adults across England, Scotland and Wales and found that 84% of participants polled would be willing to pay more tax if the NHS’s level of service ‘improved a great deal’, compared with 75% who would be willing to pay more tax for slightly improved services. 61% would be willing to pay more if it ensured that services remained at current levels.

Niall Dickson, chief executive of the NHS Confederation, said: “The poll shows that the British people are willing to pay more for better care and that there is an understanding we have to change the way we deliver care – we cannot go on as we have been.

“But we must not raise expectations about what can be achieved – there will be tough decisions ahead. The settlement is welcome, but falls short of the 4% independent experts say we need to deliver even modest improvements.

“It is now undeniably clear there is an appetite among the taxpayers to put their hands in their pockets for the cash we need to make the NHS a service we can be proud of in its 70th year and for the years to come”.

Full story: Majority of public willing to pay more tax for NHS | OnMedica

Digital change in health and social care

This Kings Fund report aims to support  local organisations looking to undertake large-scale digital change. The document states that the future is bright for technology in health and social care, with local care providers digitising under their own steam and initiative.

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The report shares the lessons from five varied case study sites that have made significant progress towards their digital aims. It sets out the lessons learnt and tips for other organisations that are looking to progress their own digital change.

Overview

  • The use of digital technology in health and social care can improve quality, efficiency and patient experience as well as supporting more integrated care and improving the health of a population.
  • Large-scale change involving digital technology, such as adopting electronic patient records (EPRs) and shared care records, is complex and necessitates attention to particular aspects of the change.
  • This report shares practical learning from a series of case studies where significant largescale digital change is happening.
  • Key barriers to successful digital change include the constraints care organisations face in their workforce, tight budgets, organisations’ attitudes towards risk and the relationships that exist between care providers and key stakeholders.
  • Most of the barriers can be mitigated through time and effort and by treating digital projects as change projects, not IT projects. Effective and consistent staff engagement and resource allocation to the project are key factors in success.

The Kings Fund have also produced an interactive map which brings together case studies from across England, highlighting some of the places that are experimenting with and implementing new technologies to achieve better health outcomes or more efficient care.

Full report: Digital change in health and social care

A summary of the report is available here

Multi-disciplinary diagnostic centre at University College London Hospital delivers faster diagnosis

NHS England | June 2018 | Multi-disciplinary diagnostic centre at University College London Hospital delivers faster diagnosis

A new case study published by NHS England shows how the multidisciplinary diagnostic centre (MDC) at University College London Hospital (UCLH), delivers faster diagnosis and improved patient journeys, to patients presenting with complex or vague abdominal symptoms.

It is available from NHS England

Driving improvement: Case studies from GP practices

This publication from the Care Quality Commission looks at 10 GP practices that have achieved a significant improvement on their rating.

Key themes

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Image source: http://www.cqc.org.uk

The practices in this report faced similar challenges. They all showed an impressive commitment to improve their service to patients. To achieve this they shared common experiences:

  • strong leadership from a practice manager with the time and skills to lead the practice team
  • addressing staffing and training issues such as poor recruitment or training practices
  • making sure every member of the practice team understood their own and others roles and responsibilities
  • involving the whole team in running the practice
  • involving patients and the local community
  • using external support to help improvement

Their experiences show that improvement in GP practices is possible. The case studies highlight some clear actions that other practices can use to help them learn and improve.

Full report: Driving improvement: Case studies from 10 GP practices

Improving the experiences of people who use services

This briefing looks at what the vanguards have been doing to improve the way people experience and interact with health and care services, and shares the lessons that other organisations and partnerships can take from the vanguards’ experiences | NHS Providers

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This final briefing in the Learning from the new care models series highlights how the vanguards are improving the experiences of people using services and their families.

The briefing looks at the work of the vanguards in the following areas:

  • Coordinating care around peoples’ needs
  • Ensuring people receive high-quality care wherever they are
  • Specialist care closer to home
  • Reducing the need to travel
  • Directing people to the right care, faster
  • Supporting people to manage long-term conditions
  • Supporting people to develop self-confidence
  • Tailoring care for people with the greatest needs
  • Making access to urgent care as simple as possible
  • Promoting health and wellbeing among people and communities
  • Helping people connect
  • Supporting carers to stay well
  • Working with people to design services that work for them

Full briefing:
Learning from the vanguards: improving the experiences of people who use services

Review of children and young people’s mental health services

This report describes the findings of our independent review of the system of services that support children and young people’s mental health | Care Quality Commission (CQC)

This CQC report indicates that many children and young people experiencing mental health problems don’t get the kind of care they deserve; the system is complicated, with no easy or clear way to get help or support.

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Image source: http://www.cqc.org.uk

The report makes a number of recommendations to organisations responsible for making sure that the problems with mental health services are dealt with, including:

  • The Secretary of State for Health and Social Care should make sure there is joint action across government to make children and young people’s mental health a national priority, working with ministers in health, social care, education, housing and local government
  • Local organisations must work together to deliver a clear ‘local offer’ of the care and support available to children and young people
  • Government, employers and schools should make sure that everyone that works, volunteers or cares for children and young people are trained to encourage good mental health and offer basic mental health support
  • Ofsted should look at what schools are doing to support children and young people’s mental health when they inspect

Full report: Are we listening? A review of children and young people’s mental health services

See also:

Improving the experience of care and support for people using adult social care services

This guideline covers the care and support of adults receiving social care in their own homes, residential care and community settings | National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)

This NICE guideline aims to help people understand what care they can expect in residential and community settings, and to improve their experience by supporting them to make decisions about their care.

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The guideline has been developed by a committee of people who use services, and carers and professionals. It has used information from a review of research evidence about people’s experiences of care and support, and from expert witnesses. The committee also gave consideration to the potential resource impact of the recommendations. The recommendations are considered to be aspirational but achievable.

It includes recommendations on:

It is for:

  • Practitioners working in adult social care services in all settings.
  • Service managers and providers of adult social care services.
  • Commissioners of adult social care services.
  • People using services (including those who fund their own care) and their families, carers and advocates.

Full reference: People’s experience in adult social care services: improving the experience of care and support for people using adult social care services | NICE guideline [NG86]

See also:  NICE interactive flowchart – People’s experience in adult social care services