Procuring for effective wound management [Shared Atlas of Learning Case Study]

NHS England | November 2018 |Procuring for effective wound management

A case study on the NHS England’s Shared Atlas features an innovation from a nursing team who introduced a centralised procurement system,  generating savings of £45,000 which has been reinvested in services.

The nursing team for the Wound and Lymphedema service at the East London Wound Healing Centre identified significant unwarranted variation in the supply and use of wound care products across their service, with variation in a standardised approach to dressing choice and in some instances the most optimal dressing was not being utilised.

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This innovation led to:

Better outcomes – Enabling clinicians to directly order on a patient needs-based approach has improved care and outcomes, helping to identify patients with complex needs and triggering specialist interventions. Standardising wound care based upon best practice will also improve outcomes for patients.

Better experience – The supply system has reduced delays in treatment for patients and keeping track of ordering trends has highlighted training needs and targeted support to some teams and providers. The new system has resulted in effective and efficient access to dressings for patients and improved patient care.

Better use of resources – The scheme has operated within the original budget despite an 18% increase in population. Savings of £45,000 have also been reinvested in services. Total wound care spend per patient in Tower Hamlets is significantly below the national average without compromise on quality of service provision. The procurement system has done this by reducing over-ordering and the associated risk of dressings going unused. The scheme has generated cash savings of £82k that has been reinvested back into services such a wound care projects or interventions.

Read the full case study at NHS England 

 

Increasing continuity of care in General Practice

The Health Foundation is supporting five large-scale GP practices and federations to carry out targeted improvement work to increase continuity of care in their practices.

The Increasing Continuity of Care in General Practice programme will explore what continuity of care will look like, considering relationships between GPs and patients, and also examining whether better information and management practices can help increase continuity with the aim of bringing benefits to both staff and patients.

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This programme is inspired by recent Health Foundation research which demonstrated that patients with ambulatory care sensitive conditions who see the same GP a greater proportion of the time have fewer unplanned hospital admissions. The programme has been developed with the advice and support of the Royal College of General Practitioners.

Each project will run for up to two years and each project team will receive up to £250,000 of funding to support the implementation, evaluation and dissemination of findings from their work.

Full story at The Health Foundation

Opportunity to build quality and service improvement capability

NHS Improvement | October 2018| Opportunity to build quality and service improvement capability

NHS Improvement has opened applications for  its ACT Academy’s QSIR College (quality, service improvement and redesign) programme in Leeds and the South West.

The programme is an opportunity for both clinical and non-clinical staff with experience in service improvement to build service improvement capability within their organisation or across their system.

Full details including more information about the programme and how to apply are at NHS Improvement 

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The QSIR programmes are delivered in a variety of formats to suit different levels of improvement experience and are supported by publications that guide participants in the use of tried and tested improvement tools, and featured approaches, as well as encouraging reflective learning.

See NHS Improvement 

NHS patients willing to pay more tax to improve services

More than four in five of NHS users would be willing to pay more tax to secure significant improvements to the service, according to a new poll commissioned by the NHS Confederation | story via OnMedica

The Ipsos MORI poll surveyed 1,003 adults across England, Scotland and Wales and found that 84% of participants polled would be willing to pay more tax if the NHS’s level of service ‘improved a great deal’, compared with 75% who would be willing to pay more tax for slightly improved services. 61% would be willing to pay more if it ensured that services remained at current levels.

Niall Dickson, chief executive of the NHS Confederation, said: “The poll shows that the British people are willing to pay more for better care and that there is an understanding we have to change the way we deliver care – we cannot go on as we have been.

“But we must not raise expectations about what can be achieved – there will be tough decisions ahead. The settlement is welcome, but falls short of the 4% independent experts say we need to deliver even modest improvements.

“It is now undeniably clear there is an appetite among the taxpayers to put their hands in their pockets for the cash we need to make the NHS a service we can be proud of in its 70th year and for the years to come”.

Full story: Majority of public willing to pay more tax for NHS | OnMedica

Digital change in health and social care

This Kings Fund report aims to support  local organisations looking to undertake large-scale digital change. The document states that the future is bright for technology in health and social care, with local care providers digitising under their own steam and initiative.

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The report shares the lessons from five varied case study sites that have made significant progress towards their digital aims. It sets out the lessons learnt and tips for other organisations that are looking to progress their own digital change.

Overview

  • The use of digital technology in health and social care can improve quality, efficiency and patient experience as well as supporting more integrated care and improving the health of a population.
  • Large-scale change involving digital technology, such as adopting electronic patient records (EPRs) and shared care records, is complex and necessitates attention to particular aspects of the change.
  • This report shares practical learning from a series of case studies where significant largescale digital change is happening.
  • Key barriers to successful digital change include the constraints care organisations face in their workforce, tight budgets, organisations’ attitudes towards risk and the relationships that exist between care providers and key stakeholders.
  • Most of the barriers can be mitigated through time and effort and by treating digital projects as change projects, not IT projects. Effective and consistent staff engagement and resource allocation to the project are key factors in success.

The Kings Fund have also produced an interactive map which brings together case studies from across England, highlighting some of the places that are experimenting with and implementing new technologies to achieve better health outcomes or more efficient care.

Full report: Digital change in health and social care

A summary of the report is available here

Multi-disciplinary diagnostic centre at University College London Hospital delivers faster diagnosis

NHS England | June 2018 | Multi-disciplinary diagnostic centre at University College London Hospital delivers faster diagnosis

A new case study published by NHS England shows how the multidisciplinary diagnostic centre (MDC) at University College London Hospital (UCLH), delivers faster diagnosis and improved patient journeys, to patients presenting with complex or vague abdominal symptoms.

It is available from NHS England

Driving improvement: Case studies from GP practices

This publication from the Care Quality Commission looks at 10 GP practices that have achieved a significant improvement on their rating.

Key themes

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Image source: http://www.cqc.org.uk

The practices in this report faced similar challenges. They all showed an impressive commitment to improve their service to patients. To achieve this they shared common experiences:

  • strong leadership from a practice manager with the time and skills to lead the practice team
  • addressing staffing and training issues such as poor recruitment or training practices
  • making sure every member of the practice team understood their own and others roles and responsibilities
  • involving the whole team in running the practice
  • involving patients and the local community
  • using external support to help improvement

Their experiences show that improvement in GP practices is possible. The case studies highlight some clear actions that other practices can use to help them learn and improve.

Full report: Driving improvement: Case studies from 10 GP practices