New models of care in practice

The NHS Confederation has published briefings on new models of care and how they are working in practice:

Driving improvement: case studies from eight NHS trusts

Reviewing the culture of NHS trusts and addressing disconnects between clinicians and managers within the organisation is key to improving care, a new CQC report has revealed. | Care Quality Commission | via National Health Executive

street-1435744_1920

The CQC has published ‘Driving improvement: case studies from eight NHS trusts’.

The document examines how a number of different trusts improved care and subsequently their CQC rating by making simple changes to how services were run.

During its study, the inspectorate found that engaging with staff and allowing for open and honest conversations was vital to making improvements to care delivery.

The CQC also discovered that successful trusts tended to make their chief executives and senior staff more visible by having them spend more time on the ‘shop floor’ – meeting staff and setting up regular channels of communication. The report also highlights the increasing challenges faced by trusts.

Read more at National Health Executive

Full report: ‘Driving improvement: case studies from eight NHS trusts’.

Does home-based primary care improve patient outcomes?

An Overview Of Home-Based Primary Care: Learning From The Field | Commonwealth Fund

This Commonwealth Fund briefing synthesises the evidence and expert perspectives on how outcomes and costs are affected by utilising home-based primary care for housebound or functionally-limited patients. It finds that successful home-based primary care uses multidisciplinary teams, behavioural insights, social support and rapid response to acute care needs to reduce care costs and improve patient outcomes.

The briefing concludes that successful home-based care practices have achieved robust savings, but the future of the model will rely on innovative payment models and training initiatives.

Improving quality and safety in healthcare

NHS Improvement has published a shared learning resource on Improving quality and safety in healthcare. 

This resource contains case studies from providers that have been rated ‘good’ for safety by the Care Quality Commission.  They offer practical guidance to developing and spreading good practice on the following:

Read more at NHS Improvement

Caring for acutely ill patients

corridor

The King’s Fund has published Organising care at the NHS front line: who is responsible? 

The report looks at the reality of caring for acutely ill medical patients at the NHS front line and asks how care in hospitals can be improved. It comprises a series of essays by frontline clinicians, managers, quality improvement champions and patients, and provides detail about how clinical care is currently provided and how it could be improved.

The report highlights that providing safe and high-quality care for acutely ill medical patients has always been challenging but has become more so as the volume and complexity of work has increased. Amongst its recommendations is that there should be a much stronger focus on how care is organised on hospital wards and in clinics throughout the NHS and greater standardisation of care processes.

The full report can be downloaded here

Emergency departments under pressure

The Institute of Health Care Management has published The Winter’s Tale: leadership lessons from emergency departments under pressure.

winter

Image source: ihm.org.uk/

The report focuses on the processes and behaviours of the emergency teams that are managing to deliver outstanding results despite the ever increasing challenges.

This report highlights the importance of using data to identify and shape solutions to the pressures in emergency departments.  It identifies key lessons for managers working in or with emergency departments.

The full report can be read online here.

Total transformation of care and support

The Social Care Institute for Excellence has published Creating the five year forward view for social care: how transformed and integrated health and care could improve outcomes and cost-effectiveness.

This updated paper explores the potential for scaling up the most promising examples of care, support and community health services, initially using data from Birmingham City Council, modelling their outcomes and costs.  Originally published in November 2016, it has been updated to include additional models.

The report contains the following chapters:

Vision for transformed care: Re-shaping services around the needs and strengths of individuals, families and communities.

Key messages and summary: Outcomes can be improved, and costs reduced, if the sector scales up promising practice.

Case studies: Six models of care and their potential impact on costs and outcomes.

Models of care: Overview of promising practice that support transformative change in health and social care.

Conclusions and next steps

The paper is available to download here