A journey to improved staff engagement – in our shoes

NHS Employers, August 2017

Imperial-college

Source: NHS Employers

 

This case study looks at how Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust has significantly improved their staff engagement levels using new and innovative methods. Through engaging with staff to understand more about how they are feeling at work, engagement levels have improved from the 2015 score of 3.71 to 3.8 in 2016, which was the largest year-on-year increase of all acute trusts in London.

 

 

 

 

How ward staff engage with the implementation of a patient safety intervention

A patient safety intervention was tested in a 33-ward randomised controlled trial | BMJ Open

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Objectives: No statistically significant difference between intervention and control wards was found. We conducted a process evaluation of the trial and our aim in this paper is to understand staff engagement across the 17 intervention wards.

Findings: First, there were palpable differences in the ways that the 17 ward teams engaged with the key components of the intervention. Five main engagement typologies were evident across the life course of the study: consistent, partial, increasing, decreasing and disengaged. Second, the intensity of support for the intervention at the level of the organisation does not predict the strength of engagement at the level of the individual ward team. Third, the standardisation of facilitative processes provided by the research team does not ensure that implementation standardisation of the intervention occurs by ward staff.

Conclusions: A dilution of the intervention occurred during the trial because wards engaged with Patient Reporting and Action for a Safe Environment (PRASE) in divergent ways, despite the standardisation of key components. Facilitative processes were not sufficiently adequate to enable intervention wards to successfully engage with PRASE components.

Full reference: Sheard, L. et al (2017) Exploring how ward staff engage with the implementation of a patient safety intervention: a UK-based qualitative process evaluation. BMJ Open. 7:e014558

Enabling Professionalism In Nursing And Midwifery Practice

This guide is aimed at all nurses and midwives and sets out what professionalism can look like in everyday practice | Nursing and Midwifery Council

professionalism

Image source: NMC

Professionalism means something to everyone who works as a nurse or midwife. Being an inspiring role model working in the best interests of people in your care, regardless of what position you hold and where you deliver care, is what really brings practice and behaviour together in harmony.  This guide demonstrates how applying the values of the code of conduct should be at the centre of all nursing and midwifery practice. For employers, it identifies key principles which will help them to provide practice environments that support and encourage professionalism among nurses and midwives.

A-EQUIP midwifery supervision model

The model supports a continuous improvement process that builds personal and professional resilience, enhances quality of care and supports preparedness for appraisal and professional revalidation | NHS England

The ultimate aim of using the A-EQUIP model is that through staff empowerment and development, action to improve quality of care becomes an intrinsic part of everyone’s job, every day in all parts of the system.

With the help of midwives, the Local Supervising Authority national taskforce and the projects Editorial Board, ‘A-EQUIP Operational Guidance’ has been developed.

The guidance is in four parts:

  • Part one describes the impact of the legislative change on midwifery regulation and the changes to midwifery supervision
  • Part two describes the A-EQUIP model and its benefit to midwives and users of maternity services
  • Part three has a clinical focus. Case studies show how the model can be deployed to support staff working in clinical and non-clinical roles and the benefits of the model to the multidisciplinary team
  • Part four provides guidance for:
    • Midwives and providers of maternity services and describes key actions for maternity providers
    • CCGs
    • HEIs

Full guidance can be found here

Using appreciative inquiry to implement person-centred dementia care in hospital wards

Scerri, A. et al. Dementia. Published online: October 6 2016

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The quality of care of persons with dementia in hospitals is not optimal and can be challenging. Moreover, staff may find difficulty in translating what they have learned during training into practice. This paper report the development and evaluation of a set of workshops using an appreciative inquiry approach to implement person-centred dementia care in two hospital wards.

Staff worked collaboratively to develop a ward vision and to implement a number of action plans. Using appreciative inquiry approach, staff attitudes towards persons with dementia improved, inter-professional collaboration was enhanced and small changes in staff practices were noted. Dementia care in hospitals can be enhanced by empowering staff to take small but concrete actions after they engage in appreciative inquiry workshops, during which they are listened to and appreciated for what they can contribute.

Read the abstract here

New care models and staff engagement

NHS Confederation, NHS Clinical Commissioners, NHS Providers and the Local Government Association, have  published a  guide to the work vanguards are doing to engage their staff in the design and delivery of new care models.

The new report – New Care Models and Staff Engagement: All Aboard aims to help spread the learning from the vanguard programme across the health and care sector.

The publication contains four case studies which examine the ongoing work of NHS and local government organisations that are ensuring staff are at the heart of all decisions about new models of care in local areas.

Fostering staff engagement – guidance for line managers

Research on line managers staff engagement – NHS Employers

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How do line managers in the NHS engage with their teams? This research looks at the experiences of 90 line managers across six trusts in the UK and reflects their views on what it is like to be a line manager in the NHS.

NHS line managers are important and play a crucial role, contributing to the success of an organisation. So what support do they need, what are their common challenges and how can senior leaders use managers to improve the communication between senior leaders and staff?

Read the report to find out more.

via Research on line managers staff engagement – NHS Employers.