Emergency re-admissions to hospital

Healthwatch has published an analysis of data from hospital trusts examining emergency readmission data from the last five years.

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Seventy two hospital trusts responded to the Healthwatch enquiry; their data indicate that emergency readmissions have risen by a fifth since 2012/13:

  • Between 2012/13 – 2016/17 the number of emergency readmissions rose by 22.8%. This compares with a 9.3% rise in overall admissions to hospitals during the same period.
  • The numbers of emergency readmissions within 24 hours rose even faster with a 29.2% increase
  • The number readmitted within 48 hours account for 1 in 5 of the overall total of emergency readmissions (21.6%)

Healthwatch is calling on the NHS to do more to understand why people are returning to hospital after being discharged.

Full story at Healthwatch

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Are we living longer?

Health profile for England. A report combining Public Health England (PHE) data and knowledge on the health of the population in England in 2017.

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This report focuses on the question ‘are we living longer, and are the extra years spent in good or bad health?’.

It summarises and interprets current trends in health outcomes in England, in particular:

  • life expectancy
  • health life expectancy
  • morbidity
  • mortality

It explores the impact of risk factors on these health outcomes and considers how England compares with other developed countries. It summarises inequalities in outcomes and the impact of the social determinants of health.

The 7 chapters can be read alone or as a series:

  1. Life expectancy, healthy life expectancy and years lived in poor health
  2. Major causes of death and how they have changed
  3. Trends in morbidity and risk factors
  4. European comparisons
  5. Health inequalities
  6. Social determinants of health
  7. Emerging health protection issues

Full report available here

Dementia numbers set to rise to 1.2 million by 2040 in England & Wales

Experts are predicting that there will be 1.2 million people in England and Wales living with dementia by 2040 – a rise of 57% from 2016 – due to increased life expectancy.

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A study  published in The BMJ  says that although the number of newly diagnosed cases of dementia is falling, the overall prevalence will increase substantially as people live longer and deaths from other causes, such as heart disease, continue to decline.

The team of researchers  based at University College London (UCL) and the University of Liverpool, set out to predict the future burden of dementia with more certainty by developing a mathematical model that takes account of disease trends and death rates alongside the effects of increasing life expectancy.  They calculated that there were currently 767,000 people living with dementia in England and Wales and the number would increase to more than 1.2 million by 2040.

Full story at OnMedica

Full reference: Ahmadi-Abhari, S et al.  Temporal trend in dementia incidence since 2002 and projections for prevalence in England and Wales to 2040: modelling study BMJ Published 05 July 2017

 

 

Adult smoking habits in the UK: 2016

Cigarette smoking among adults including the proportion of people who smoke including demographic breakdowns, changes over time, and e-cigarettes. | Office for National Statistics

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Main points

  • In 2016, of all adult survey respondents in the UK, 15.8% smoked which equates to around 7.6 million in the population.
  • Of the constituent countries, 15.5% of adults in England smoked; for Wales, this figure was 16.9%; Scotland, 17.7% and Northern Ireland, 18.1%.
  • In the UK, 17.7% of men were current smokers which was significantly higher in comparison with 14.1% of women.
  • Those aged 18 to 24 in the UK experienced the largest decline in smoking prevalence of 6.5 percentage points since 2010.
  • Among current smokers in Great Britain, men smoked 12.0 cigarettes each day on average whereas women smoked 11.0 cigarettes each day on average; these are some of the lowest levels observed since 1974.
  • In Great Britain, 5.6% of respondents in 2016 stated they currently used an e-cigarette in 2016, which equates to approximately 2.9 million people in the population.

Access the full document: Adult smoking habits in the UK: 2016

Suicide prevalence in Engalnd by occupation

Office for National Statistics (ONS) analysis reveals which professions have the highest risk of suicide. | Public Health England | ONS

An analysis of ONS suicide prevalence statistics for 2011 to 2015 has been carried out to gain a better understanding of factors that influence suicide, in order to inform the government’s Suicide Prevention Strategy and help identify where inequalities exist amongst different groups.

The new ONS analysis shows that suicides are less common for females than males, and that there are differences in the types of occupation where suicide is more common. For women, occupations with a high risk of suicide include nurses (23% above the national average), primary school teachers (42% above average) and those working in culture, media and sport (69% above average).

For men, low skilled labourers in construction had a risk that was 3 times higher than that the average for England; men working in skilled construction jobs also had an increased risk. Both male and female care workers have a risk of suicide that was almost twice the national average.

To coincide with this publication, Public Health England, Business in the Community (BITC) and Samaritans have joined forces to produce toolkits for employers on how to prevent suicide and how to minimise the impact when it does happen.

The toolkits produced by PHE, BITC and Samaritans include advice on steps employers can take action to prevent suicides and support them and their teams when responding to the death of an employee caused by suicide.

Download the suicide prevention toolkit for employers.

Download the suicide postvention toolkit for employers.

Hospital performance

The NHS Combined Performance Summary is a monthly release of data on key performance metrics for the NHS. Here are some of the most important aspects relating to quality. The Health Foundation has issued a statement about this month’s data release, which can be read here.

For more in-depth analysis of the data over time, visit the QualityWatch indicators.

 

Dentists’ morale has generally fallen

This report explores the relationship between the motivation and morale of selfemployed primary care dentists and their working patterns.

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Despite this, over half of dentists (57 per cent) report that they have the opportunity to do challenging and interesting work and 55 per cent agreed that they feel good about their job. However, the report also found that the more time dentists spent on NHS work, the lower their levels of motivation.

The report explores the relationship between dentists’ motivation and morale and their working patterns, considering in particular:

  •  Weekly hours of work
  •  Division of time between NHS and private dentistry
  •  Division of time between clinical and non-clinical work
  •  Weeks of annual leave
  •  Age

Read the full overview here

Read the full report here