Adult smoking habits in the UK: 2016

Cigarette smoking among adults including the proportion of people who smoke including demographic breakdowns, changes over time, and e-cigarettes. | Office for National Statistics

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Main points

  • In 2016, of all adult survey respondents in the UK, 15.8% smoked which equates to around 7.6 million in the population.
  • Of the constituent countries, 15.5% of adults in England smoked; for Wales, this figure was 16.9%; Scotland, 17.7% and Northern Ireland, 18.1%.
  • In the UK, 17.7% of men were current smokers which was significantly higher in comparison with 14.1% of women.
  • Those aged 18 to 24 in the UK experienced the largest decline in smoking prevalence of 6.5 percentage points since 2010.
  • Among current smokers in Great Britain, men smoked 12.0 cigarettes each day on average whereas women smoked 11.0 cigarettes each day on average; these are some of the lowest levels observed since 1974.
  • In Great Britain, 5.6% of respondents in 2016 stated they currently used an e-cigarette in 2016, which equates to approximately 2.9 million people in the population.

Access the full document: Adult smoking habits in the UK: 2016

Suicide prevalence in Engalnd by occupation

Office for National Statistics (ONS) analysis reveals which professions have the highest risk of suicide. | Public Health England | ONS

An analysis of ONS suicide prevalence statistics for 2011 to 2015 has been carried out to gain a better understanding of factors that influence suicide, in order to inform the government’s Suicide Prevention Strategy and help identify where inequalities exist amongst different groups.

The new ONS analysis shows that suicides are less common for females than males, and that there are differences in the types of occupation where suicide is more common. For women, occupations with a high risk of suicide include nurses (23% above the national average), primary school teachers (42% above average) and those working in culture, media and sport (69% above average).

For men, low skilled labourers in construction had a risk that was 3 times higher than that the average for England; men working in skilled construction jobs also had an increased risk. Both male and female care workers have a risk of suicide that was almost twice the national average.

To coincide with this publication, Public Health England, Business in the Community (BITC) and Samaritans have joined forces to produce toolkits for employers on how to prevent suicide and how to minimise the impact when it does happen.

The toolkits produced by PHE, BITC and Samaritans include advice on steps employers can take action to prevent suicides and support them and their teams when responding to the death of an employee caused by suicide.

Download the suicide prevention toolkit for employers.

Download the suicide postvention toolkit for employers.

Hospital performance

The NHS Combined Performance Summary is a monthly release of data on key performance metrics for the NHS. Here are some of the most important aspects relating to quality. The Health Foundation has issued a statement about this month’s data release, which can be read here.

For more in-depth analysis of the data over time, visit the QualityWatch indicators.

 

Dentists’ morale has generally fallen

This report explores the relationship between the motivation and morale of selfemployed primary care dentists and their working patterns.

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Despite this, over half of dentists (57 per cent) report that they have the opportunity to do challenging and interesting work and 55 per cent agreed that they feel good about their job. However, the report also found that the more time dentists spent on NHS work, the lower their levels of motivation.

The report explores the relationship between dentists’ motivation and morale and their working patterns, considering in particular:

  •  Weekly hours of work
  •  Division of time between NHS and private dentistry
  •  Division of time between clinical and non-clinical work
  •  Weeks of annual leave
  •  Age

Read the full overview here

Read the full report here

Dementia on the downslide, especially among people with more education

In a hopeful sign for the health of the nation’s brains, the percentage of American seniors with dementia is dropping, a new study finds | ScienceDaily

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The downward trend has emerged despite something else the study shows: a rising tide of three factors that are thought to raise dementia risk by interfering with brain blood flow, namely diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity.

Those with the most years of education had the lowest chances of developing dementia, according to the findings published in JAMA Internal Medicine by a team from the University of Michigan. This may help explain the larger trend, because today’s seniors are more likely to have at least a high school diploma than those in the same age range a decade ago.

With the largest generation in American history now entering the prime years for dementia onset, the new results add to a growing number of recent studies in the United States and other countries that suggest a downward trend in dementia prevalence. These findings may help policy-makers and economic forecasters adjust their predictions for the total impact of Alzheimer’s disease and other conditions.

Read the full review here

Read the original research article here

Child poverty in the UK

The Campaign group End Child Poverty has published its latest Child poverty map of the UK 2016.  The map provides statistics on the level of child poverty in each constituency, local authority and ward in the UK.  It highlights there  are now more than three and a half million children living in poverty in the UK, and that whilst child poverty exists in every part of the country, as many as 47% of children are living in poverty in some areas  compared to one in ten in others.

Click on the image below to view the interactive map:

Additional link: RCPCH press release

Areas of NHS will implode this winter, expert warns

Parts of the NHS “will implode” this winter, an expert has warned, as new figures show falling A&E performance over the past few months. | The Guardian

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Dr Mark Holland, the president of the Society for Acute Medicine, said the days when summer used to provide a respite for busy emergency departments had gone, and instead the NHS faced an “eternal winter”.

The NHS was “on its knees” and a major increase in hospital admissions due to flu or the sickness bug norovirus could lead to collapse, he added.

Holland spoke out as new figures show that waiting times in A&E units in England this summer have been worse than for most winters stretching back more than a decade.

One in 10 patients waited more than four hours in A&E during June, July and August – worse than any winter in the past 12 years bar one, analysis by the BBC showed. Only last winter marked a worse performance since the target was launched in 2004.

Related: The King’s Fund responds to latest NHS performance statistics