A&E Attendances and Emergency Admissions

NHS England has released the latest A & E figures. The Weekly and Monthly A&E Attendances and Emergency Admissions collection collects the total number of attendances in the specified period for all A&E types, including Minor Injury Units and Walk-in Centres, and of these, the number discharged, admitted or transferred within four hours of arrival.


Also included are the number of Emergency Admissions, and any waits of over four hours for admission following decision to admit.

The total number of attendances in January 2018 was 2,000,000, an increase of 5.5% on the same month last year. Of these, attendances at type 1 A&E departments were 1.6% higher. Attendances over the latest twelve months are 1.1 % higher than levels in the preceding twelve month period.
NHS England |A&E Attendances and Emergency Admissions |January 2018Monthly figures  data set from NHS England A statistical commentary is available  from NHS England

Related content:

The Guardian NHS hospitals in England record worst ever A&E performance

The Independent NHS A&E waiting times hit worst levels on record, show latest figures


Child development outcomes at 2 to 2 and a half years metrics: 2017 to 2018

The latest statistics for child development outcomes have been published by Public Health England  (PHE) which collects data submitted by local authorities.


The data is collected from the health visitor reviews completed at 2 to 2 and a half years using the Ages and Stages Questionnaire 3 (ASQ-3).

The metrics presented are ‘the percentage of children who were at or above the expected level’ in these areas of development:

  • communication skills
  • gross motor skills
  • fine motor skills
  • problem solving skills
  • personal-social skills
  • all five areas of development

The  data table and statistical commentary  are available

Guidance on using these statistics and other resources can also be found here


Advancing applied analytics

The Health Foundation has selected 12 projects to take part in the first round of its Advancing Applied Analytics programme.  The programme aims to improve analytical capability in support of health and care services.  It supports analysts who are working on local innovative projects, to help them demonstrate improvements to analytical capability in health and care services and provide lessons for the wider care system.

NHS Digital consultations

  • National contract reporting specifications for commissioners – as part of developing information standards to support commissioning, CCGs are being asked to ensure the proposed reporting formats meet their needs.  Closing date for comments: 26 January 2018.
  • Aligning the publication days of official statistics – NHS Digital’s statistical publications are currently released on any working day of the week except Monday.  NHS Digital is deciding whether to rationalise the days on which it publishes official statistics or continue to publish as it does now.  Closing date for comments: 16 February 2018.

Emergency re-admissions to hospital

Healthwatch has published an analysis of data from hospital trusts examining emergency readmission data from the last five years.

full circle

Seventy two hospital trusts responded to the Healthwatch enquiry; their data indicate that emergency readmissions have risen by a fifth since 2012/13:

  • Between 2012/13 – 2016/17 the number of emergency readmissions rose by 22.8%. This compares with a 9.3% rise in overall admissions to hospitals during the same period.
  • The numbers of emergency readmissions within 24 hours rose even faster with a 29.2% increase
  • The number readmitted within 48 hours account for 1 in 5 of the overall total of emergency readmissions (21.6%)

Healthwatch is calling on the NHS to do more to understand why people are returning to hospital after being discharged.

Full story at Healthwatch

Are we living longer?

Health profile for England. A report combining Public Health England (PHE) data and knowledge on the health of the population in England in 2017.


This report focuses on the question ‘are we living longer, and are the extra years spent in good or bad health?’.

It summarises and interprets current trends in health outcomes in England, in particular:

  • life expectancy
  • health life expectancy
  • morbidity
  • mortality

It explores the impact of risk factors on these health outcomes and considers how England compares with other developed countries. It summarises inequalities in outcomes and the impact of the social determinants of health.

The 7 chapters can be read alone or as a series:

  1. Life expectancy, healthy life expectancy and years lived in poor health
  2. Major causes of death and how they have changed
  3. Trends in morbidity and risk factors
  4. European comparisons
  5. Health inequalities
  6. Social determinants of health
  7. Emerging health protection issues

Full report available here

Dementia numbers set to rise to 1.2 million by 2040 in England & Wales

Experts are predicting that there will be 1.2 million people in England and Wales living with dementia by 2040 – a rise of 57% from 2016 – due to increased life expectancy.


A study  published in The BMJ  says that although the number of newly diagnosed cases of dementia is falling, the overall prevalence will increase substantially as people live longer and deaths from other causes, such as heart disease, continue to decline.

The team of researchers  based at University College London (UCL) and the University of Liverpool, set out to predict the future burden of dementia with more certainty by developing a mathematical model that takes account of disease trends and death rates alongside the effects of increasing life expectancy.  They calculated that there were currently 767,000 people living with dementia in England and Wales and the number would increase to more than 1.2 million by 2040.

Full story at OnMedica

Full reference: Ahmadi-Abhari, S et al.  Temporal trend in dementia incidence since 2002 and projections for prevalence in England and Wales to 2040: modelling study BMJ Published 05 July 2017