Adult smoking habits in the UK: 2016

Cigarette smoking among adults including the proportion of people who smoke including demographic breakdowns, changes over time, and e-cigarettes. | Office for National Statistics

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Main points

  • In 2016, of all adult survey respondents in the UK, 15.8% smoked which equates to around 7.6 million in the population.
  • Of the constituent countries, 15.5% of adults in England smoked; for Wales, this figure was 16.9%; Scotland, 17.7% and Northern Ireland, 18.1%.
  • In the UK, 17.7% of men were current smokers which was significantly higher in comparison with 14.1% of women.
  • Those aged 18 to 24 in the UK experienced the largest decline in smoking prevalence of 6.5 percentage points since 2010.
  • Among current smokers in Great Britain, men smoked 12.0 cigarettes each day on average whereas women smoked 11.0 cigarettes each day on average; these are some of the lowest levels observed since 1974.
  • In Great Britain, 5.6% of respondents in 2016 stated they currently used an e-cigarette in 2016, which equates to approximately 2.9 million people in the population.

Access the full document: Adult smoking habits in the UK: 2016

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Burning Injustice: Reducing tobacco-driven harm and inequality

Recommendations to the government, local authorities and the NHS | All Party Parliamentary Group on Smoking and Health

burning-injustice

Image source: APPGSH

The APPGSH launched this inquiry to review current action on tobacco control in response to concerns that funding is being reduced or not used effectively for work on tobacco control. The report provides evidence-based recommendations to the government, local authorities and the NHS for effective action to further reduce smoking prevalence at a time of austerity.

Read the full report here

New rules on the packaging of tobacco and advertising e -cigarettes

https://www.flickr.com/photos/87735223@N02/25470325872/in/photolist-ENJ5vw-oQMp8A-tmCTC1-gVFs9c-bcgFMZ-hyh7pf-eqp1NG-r35THN-hKZ4GL-hKZKoX-du786C-CwNiuo-eiM8To-qUC8CG-nZENU5-qUBYLd-qCgSV6-FyevPH-nLeuLw-qvDBar-GkBF7P-pR1h7e-rsoRgG-hKZLxv-qSpB2b-mmT5dw-qUGRdk-qCfoFz-jEAf3V-icHgDY-k6VEhD-mF7SWi-qUGKZe-iiKkuw-pgpx7F-qoc441-qC8hzj-pXVvPn-fF831J-pjKNTa-odhndM-fn3ykJ-p2kCRk-ei1Xxy-iiN7D7-qC7YZE-q6PZZi-GtvKc6-fmNo7n-hqW2Fw

image source: Lindsay Fox Flickr – // CC BY-NC 2.0

The Department of Health has published two new guidance documents in relation to the changes of laws to the packaging and branding of tobacco products and the advertising of e-cigarettes:

  • Tobacco Packaging Guidance: This guidance provides an overview of new rules on the packaging of tobacco (and herbal products for smoking) for retail, which came into force on 20 May 2016.

Tobacco return on investment tool

NICE has developed a tobacco return on investment tool to help decision making in tobacco control at local and sub-national levels. The tool evaluates a portfolio of tobacco control interventions and models the economic returns that can be expected in different payback timescales. Different interventions, including pharmacotherapies and support and advice, can be mixed and matched to see which intervention portfolio or package provides the best ‘value for money’, compared with ‘no-services’ or any other specified package.  The tool is to support commissioners and policy makers, in local authorities and the NHS, in their investment decisions.

E-cigarettes around 95% less harmful than tobacco estimates landmark review

Expert independent review concludes that e-cigarettes have potential to help smokers quit.

An expert independent evidence review published today by Public Health England (PHE) concludes that e-cigarettes are significantly less harmful to health than tobacco and have the potential to help smokers quit smoking.

Key findings of the review include:

  • the current best estimate is that e-cigarettes are around 95% less harmful than smoking
  • nearly half the population (44.8%) don’t realise e-cigarettes are much less harmful than smoking
  • there is no evidence so far that e-cigarettes are acting as a route into smoking for children or non-smokers

The review, commissioned by PHE and led by Professor Ann McNeill (King’s College London) and Professor Peter Hajek (Queen Mary University of London), suggests that e-cigarettes may be contributing to falling smoking rates among adults and young people. Following the review PHE has published a paper on the implications of the evidence for policy and practice.

The comprehensive review of the evidence finds that almost all of the 2.6 million adults using e-cigarettes in Great Britain are current or ex-smokers, most of whom are using the devices to help them quit smoking or to prevent them going back to cigarettes. It also provides reassurance that very few adults and young people who have never smoked are becoming regular e-cigarette users (less than 1% in each group).

Full review E-cigarettes: an evidence update – A report commissioned by Public Health England

Related articles:

BBC News: E-cigarettes could be prescribed by the NHS to help smokers quit, report says

Guardian: Vaping: e-cigarettes safer than smoking, says Public Health England

Video: E-cigs ‘a game changer’ for smokers says report

Stopping Smoking by using other sources of nicotine

rsph

The Royal Society for Public Health has published Stopping smoking by using other sources of nicotine. This position paper is calling for public confusion over nicotine to be addressed as a way of encouraging smokers to use safer forms of the substance.  Tobacco contains nicotine along with many other chemicals, but nicotine by itself is fairly harmless.   Electronic cigarettes and Nicotine Replacement Therapy (gum, lozenges, and patches) contain nicotine but don’t contain the harmful substances found in cigarettes. The Royal Society is now calling for measures to promote safer forms of nicotine products to smokers and make it harder to use tobacco.

See also: BBC Health report

PHE – Local Tobacco Control Profiles for England

Local Tobacco Control Profiles

The Local Tobacco Control Profiles for England provides a snapshot of the extent of tobacco use, tobacco related harm, and measures being taken to reduce this harm at a local level. These profiles have been designed to help local government and health services to assess the effect of tobacco use on their local populations. They will inform commissioning and planning decisions to tackle tobacco use and improve the health of local communities.

The tool allows you to compare your local authority against other local authorities in the region and benchmark your local authority against the England or regional average.

tobacco control graph

via Local Tobacco Control Profiles for England.