RCGP: Mental health and wellbeing resource

Royal College of Physicians | February 2020 |Mental health and wellbeing resource 

A new online resource from the RCP aims to shine a spotlight on the mental health and wellbeing of physicians by opening up the conversation about mental health issues and their impact. 

 

Burnout, work-related stress, mental illness and suicide are increasingly recognised within the physician workforce. Doctors are not good at seeking help: often denying there is a problem, not recognising there is a problem, being fearful of any stigma, feeling guilt about burdening others with difficulties, or even having anxieties about possible job loss.

This mental health and wellbeing resource has been created to help you recognise the warning signs in yourself and others, as well as know about the steps you can take to stay well and seek the right support when you need it. It also shines a spotlight on what the RCP is doing to influence and improve the healthcare system in which we work.

Visit the resource here RCP

Related:

RCGP press release 

 

NHS Employers: Financial wellbeing guide

NHS Employers | January 2020 | Develop a financial wellbeing strategy

NHS Employers has recently developed a new financial wellbeing guide to support employers in developing a robust and supportive financial wellbeing strategy for their staff.

Their guide has a four-step approach to follow and can be used by all organisations regardless of which stage they might be at.

It looks at how to embed a strategy and get senior-level support, what resources and help you can signpost your staff to and what positive interventions there are.

Having financially healthy staff is important to your organisation as it could:

  • improve staff productivity
  • reduce sickness absence
  • increase performance and productivity.

What does being financially healthy look like?

If a person has good financial health, they are likely to be able to:

  • manage debts
  • save for the future
  • be worry free from financial stress

Financial wellbeing guide
Full details from NHS Employers 

Growing up unequal: gender and socioeconomic differences in young people’s health and well-being

World Health Organization | January  2019 | Growing up unequal: gender and socioeconomic differences in young people’s health and well-being

The World Health Organization (WHO)  has published its report Growing up unequal: gender and socioeconomic differences in young people’s health and well-being. 

The WHO’s Health Behaviour In Schools (HSBC) surveys over 3000 young people aged 11, 13 and 15-year-olds every four years.

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It finds that over a quarter of young people surveyed indicated that they are too tired to concentrate on their schoolwork: 17% of 11-year-olds, 28% of 13-year-olds and 42% of 15-year-olds.

The proportion of 15-year-olds who say they experience low moods at least once a week has also risen to 50% (this figures was 40% in an earlier poll). Females are less likely to have enough sleep (32%) when compared with young males (23%).

The report also observes that one in four 15-year-olds say they have self-harmed – and the proportion is rising faster among boys (Source: WHO).

In the news:
BBC News One in four children ‘has too little sleep’

The social context of adolescent mental health and wellbeing: parents, friends and social media

Across measures of mental health and wellbeing, the findings of a new study showed that girls fared much worse than boys, particularly in experiencing negative feelings and low self-concept and life satisfaction and in self-harming | Research Papers in Education 

Abstract:

Concerns about mental health difficulties in young people, mid-adolescent girls in particular, are on the rise. Many explanations ranging from peer pressure and bullying, to social media and gender inequality, have been offered for the rise in mental health problems.

This study utilised data from the Millennium Cohort Study (Wave 6) to examine 14-year-olds’ mental health and wellbeing in relation to familial and peer interactions, gender, socio-economic factors and social media use.

girl-1710188_1920Across measures of mental health and wellbeing, the findings showed that girls fared much worse than boys, particularly in experiencing negative feelings and low self-concept and life satisfaction and in self-harming. Teenage girls appeared to have become the new ‘high risk’ group.

The findings from this study have implications for young people’s mental health and wellbeing especially as seen through the lens of income and gender inequality.

Given the current political concerns about young people’s mental health, this study is hoped to contribute to an informed debate about individual wellbeing within a broader social milieu.

Full article: Dimitra Hartas  | The social context of adolescent mental health and wellbeing: parents, friends and social media | Research Papers in Education | published online: 18 December 2019

See also:

Improving children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing

This report, and associated documents, summarises the evidence for the effectiveness of universal approaches to improving children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing | Public Health England

The documents are intended for strategic and operational leads, working on children and young people’s mental health. This includes:

children wellbeing
Image source: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk
  • local commissioners
  • public health teams
  • child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS) providers
  • clinicians
  • leads in educational settings
  • those leading children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing Local Transformation Plans (LTPs)
  • voluntary, community and social enterprise sector leads and researchers

The report of the findings of a Special Interest Group summarises the approach, findings and recommendations.

Full document: Universal Approaches To Improving Children And Young People’s Mental Health And Wellbeing: Short Descriptions Of Interventions Identified From The Synthesis Of Systematic Reviews

See also: Public Health England – publications

Children and young people’s wellbeing

State of the nation 2019: children and young people’s wellbeing | The Department for Education

This report evaluates wellbeing in children and young people, including: statistics on the wellbeing of children and young people in England; wider indicators on their happiness with their relationships, self-reported health and experiences with school; and an in-depth analysis of psychological wellbeing in teenage girls.

Full report: State of the nation 2019: children and young people’s wellbeing

Additional link: DHSC press release

[NICE Consultation] Social and emotional wellbeing in primary and secondary education

NICE | April 2019 | Social and emotional wellbeing in primary and secondary education In development [GID-NG10125]  Expected publication date:  

The consultation is open until  28 May 2019 at 5pm

Full details about the consultation and documents from NICE