No “magic bullets” for treating colds, finds BMJ review

BMJ | October 2018 | What treatments are effective for common cold in adults and children?

The BMJ has reviewed over the counter (OTC) treatments for adults’ and children’s colds, with findings indicating there is little evidence of their efficacy.  The review finds that treatments claiming to relieve nasal symptoms of the common cold such as congestion, runny nose and sneezing have little evidence, and where evidence is present it is limited and low quality (Source: BMJ). 

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From the review the BMJ suggests treatments for adults with a small or possible beneficial effect include:

  • decongestants
  • NSAIDs
  • sedating antihistamines
  • antihistamine and decongestant

Treatments for adults with no evidence of effect are:

  • chinese medicinal herbs
  • echinacea
  • garlic
  • vitamin c
  • zinc

Treatments for children with a small or beneficial effect:

  • saline or nasal irrigation

Treatments for children with no evidence of effect are:

  • decongestants
  • NSAIDs
  • chinese medicinal herbs
  • echinacea
  • garlic
  • vitamin c
  • zinc

To view the table which shows the different treatments and  the full article  see BMJ

In the media:

BBC News What works for treating children’s colds?

Many gluten free products lack essential nutrients

University of Leeds | October 2018 | Many gluten free products lack essential nutrients

A survey undertaken by Dr Caroline Orfila, study co-author and Associate Professor of Nutrition at the University of Leeds and a Leeds undergraduate has found that many gluten free products lack the important micronutrients that are present in products made with white flour. They  reviewed the gluten free products available in the “big four” supermarkets: Tesco, Asda, Morrisons and Sainsbury’s. 

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According to Bread and Flour Regulations, set in 1998, UK manufacturers are required to fortify bread flours with the micronutrients these are calcium, iron, niacin and thiamine, to prevent deficiencies in the population. Presently, gluten free flours and bread are exempt from these regulations.

Dr Orfila noted: Gluten free foods need to have the same nutritional standard and be as readily available as the white wheat flour equivalents.

“Despite some improvements in the last decade to increase the amount of gluten free food in supermarkets, nutritional value, expense, and accessibility remain significant obstacles for consumers dependent on these products for serious health reasons. Gluten free foods need to have the same nutritional standard and be as readily available as the white wheat flour equivalents.” (Source: University of Leeds)

Read the press release from the University of Leeds

The findings of the review have been published in the journal Nutrients where the article may be downloaded in full

 

Child health in England in 2030

Royal College of Paediatrics & Child Health | October 2018 | Child health in England in 2030: comparisons with other wealthy countries

The Royal College of Paediatrics & Child Health have published Child health in England in 2030: comparisons with other wealthy countries, the RCPCH used long term historical data on key CYP health outcomes and various projection modelling methods to estimate CYP outcomes in 2030 in England compared with other wealthy European and western countries.

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Key findings

England has poorer health outcomes than the average across the EU15+ (the 15 EU countries in 2004 plus Canada, Australia and Norway) in most areas studied. This means that unless current trends improve, England is likely to fall further behind other wealthy countries over the next decade (Source: RCPCH).

Other findings focus on: 

Mortality

Mental health

Obesity

Accident & Emergency attendances

Outpatient attendance

The RCPCH makes a number of recommendations relating to:

  • the NHS system
  • Funding
  • Obesity
  • Mental Health
  • Healthy start

Child health in 2030 in England: comparisons with other wealthy countries

Child health in 2030 in England: comparisons with other wealthy countries
Recommendations

Related:

Nuffield Trust Child health report should set alarm bells ringing, says Nuffield Trust 

Independent Infant mortality in England will be 140% higher than EU states by 2030 without radical action, report warns  

Of interest:

BBC News Children ‘should be weighed up to age 18’, report says

The reality behind the 2019–24 NHS funding settlement

NHS Confederation | October 2018 | The reality behind the 2019–24 NHS funding settlement

NHS Confederation have developed an infographic that  outlines the financial challenge facing the NHS over the next five years.

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Image source: nhsconfed.org

It warns that commissioners and providers will need to continue to make considerable efficiency savings to remain in balance.

The document also looks at why the NHS deficit has developed, despite considerable efficiency savings delivered by both providers and commissioners.

 

Download the infographic from NHS Confederation

NICE Fellows and Scholars Programme

NICE are looking for both fellows (3 year programme) and scholars (1 year programme)  to join them 

NICE are looking for scholars to act as ambassadors and to improve the quality of care and contribute to their own professional development? They are also seeking fellows to  build an influential network that helps NICE to implement their guidance?

NICE Fellows

These are  experienced leaders from the field of health and social care who are NICE’s ambassadors at regional and national levels.

What’s involved?

NICE aim to award 10 fellowships each year to:

  • Act as our UK-wide ambassadors for 3 years.
  • Support and maintain the connection between NICE and health and social care experts.
  • Engage with senior staff at NICE and in the health and social care sector.
  • Help us improve and promote the quality of health and social care.
  • Develop new ways of working in health and social care.

 

NICE Scholars 

NICE Scholarships are one-year opportunities to find out about the inner workings of NICE. You’d undertake a supported improvement project, related to our guidance, within a local organisation, national charity or voluntary sector organisation.

What’s involved?

NICE  aim to award 10 scholarships each year to:

  • act as our ambassadors for 1 year
  • undertake a supported improvement project within a local organisation
  • support and maintain the connection between NICE and health and social care experts
  • engage with senior staff at NICE and in the health and social care sector
  • help us improve and promote the quality of health and social care
  • develop new ways of working in health and social care.

(Source: NICE)

Further details about both programmes are available from NICE, applications close Friday 9 November 2018.

NICE Fellows 

NICE Scholars

Local leadership and accountability For children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing services

Local Government Association | October 2018 | Local leadership and accountability
For children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing services

The Local Government Association (LGA) highlights case studies where 10 areas have improved their children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing services . LGA’s research explores how 10 areas, from across the country, have  improved their services through better leadership and accountability and by putting
young people centre stag(Source: LGA).

LGA
Image source: local.gov.uk

 

Local leadership and accountability For children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing services

Read the press release here 

Nine ways research could save the NHS money

NIHR | October 2018 | Nine ways research could save the NHS money

NIHR have spotlighted 9 signals to demonstrate how research can save the NHS money. The signals featured in the collection include a range of initiatives and treatments that are cost-effective for the NHS (Source: NIHR).

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All of the signals are available to read from NIHR:

  1. Weight loss surgery is value for money in people with severe obesity
  2. Surgery is no more effective than a sling for misaligned shoulder fractures
  3. Rotavirus vaccine helped to save the NHS money with a reduction in GP visits during winter
  4. Public health interventions may offer society a return on investment of £14 for each £1 spent
  5. Less stringent target oxygen levels for acute bronchiolitis  are safe and effective
  6. Routine replacement of intravenous cannulae is unnecessary and costly 
  7. Behavioural action (BA) is cheaper and can be as good as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for treating depression
  8. Redesigning oral surgery with enhanced primary dental care, electronic referral and triage may save on overall costs 
  9. Same day treatment of uterine polyps in outpatients is no worse than inpatient treatment and better value for money

See also:

HSJ | New NHS efficiency challenge is half that of 5YFV