New report shows more young people surviving cancer

Teenage Cancer Trust | January 2019 | New report shows more young people surviving cancer

A new report from Teenager Cancer Trust uses data collected by NCRAS  (National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service) which has been analysed to identify trends and share finding with partners to improve cancer services and awareness.  Now Teenage Cancer Trust report 13-24 years old who were diagnosed in England up to the end of 2015. The publication marks the first time a detailed analysis has been conducted of cancer rates of the 13 to 24-year age group and shows an encouraging increase in survival rates.

Some of the report’s key findings:

  • Mortality rates of all cancers combined in 13 to 24 year olds have decreased from 42.9 per million in 2001 to 32.3 per million in 2015.
  • The largest reduction in mortality by diagnostic group in England between 2001 and 2015 has been in Leukaemias. There were also reductions seen in mortality from Central Nervous System tumours, bone cancer and in lymphoma.
  • Five-year survival rates for cancer in 13 to 24 year olds have risen from 83% females / 80% males in (2001-05) to 87% in females / 84 % males (2007-11).
  • There are statistically significant variations in incidence and survival rates of cancer in 13 to 24 year olds based on geography and deprivation.
  • The incidence of cancer in 13 to 24 years olds in England has increased from a crude rate of 233.1 per million in 2001, to 299.7 per million in 2015 (Source: Teenage Cancer Trust).

News release Teenage Cancer Trust  New report shows more young people surviving cancer

The report is available to read and download from Teenage Cancer Trust 

BMJ Cancer: more young people in England are surviving

In the news: BBC News Teenage cancer survival ‘on the up’ in England, report finds

Hunger, malnutrition and food insecurity in the UK

New report says the Government has failed to recognise and respond to the issues of hunger, malnutrition and obesity in the UK and should appoint a minister to ensure cross-departmental action. | Environmental Audit Committee

A new report finds that food insecurity in the UK, defined as “limited access to food … due to lack of money or other resources”, is significant and growing. Levels are among the worst in Europe, especially for children, with 19% of under 15s living with an adult who is moderately or severely food insecure.

knife-and-fork-2754149_1920 The Committee heard how food insecurity can lead to both malnutrition and obesity, with people forced to rely on the very cheapest foods, which are often nutrient-poor but calorie-rich. The Government’s obesity strategy makes no mention of food insecurity and only the Department for International Development mentions hunger in its Single Departmental Plan.

Chair of the Environmental Audit Committee, Mary Creagh MP, said “Instead of seeing hunger as an issue abroad, the Government’s New Year resolution should be one of taking urgent action at home to tackle hunger and malnutrition. This can only be addressed by setting clear UK-wide targets and by appointing a Minister for Hunger to deliver them.” 

See also:

10 year olds in the UK have consumed 18 years’ worth of sugar

Public Health England | December 2018 |10 year olds in the UK have consumed 18 years’ worth of sugar 

According to figures produced by Public Health England, children are still consuming around 8 excess sugar cubes every day, a figure equivalent to approximately 2,800 excess sugar cubes each year. Although sugar consumption by children has been reduced in recent years, these statistics indicate that children have already exceeded the maximum recommended sugar intake for an 18 year old by the time they reach their tenth birthday. This is based on their total sugar consumption from the age of 2.

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To help parents manage this, Change4Life is encouraging them to ‘Make a swap when you next shop’. Making simple everyday swaps can reduce children’s sugar intake from some products (yoghurts, drinks and breakfast cereals) by half – while giving them healthier versions of the foods and drinks they enjoy.

Change4Life recommends swapping:

  • a higher-sugar yoghurt (for example split-pot) for a lower sugar one, to halve their sugar intake from 6 cubes of sugar to 3
  • a sugary juice drink for a no-added sugar juice drink, to cut back from 2 cubes to half a cube
  • a higher-sugar breakfast cereal (such as a frosted or chocolate cereal) for a lower sugar cereal, to cut back from 3 cubes to half a cube per bowl

Making these changes could remove around 2,500 sugar cubes per year from a child’s diet, but swapping chocolate, puddings, sweets, cakes and pastries for healthier options such as malt loaf, sugar-free jellies, lower-sugar custards and rice puddings would reduce their intake even further (Source: PHE).

See PHE for the full story 

BBC News Children ‘exceed recommended sugar limit by age 10’

The Independent Average 10 year old has already eaten more sugar than maximum recommended for an adult, study finds 

Victimised adolescents more likely to self-harm and have suicidal thoughts

Baldwin, J. R. et al. | 2018| Adolescent Victimization and Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors: A Genetically Sensitive Cohort Study| Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry | Vol.0 |Issue 0| DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaac.2018.07.903

Children and young people that are victimised have double the likelihood of self-harm and their risk of suicide  is trebled compared to non-victimised peers according to researchers at King’s College London. The study looked at over 2000 twins born in England and Wales between 1994-95. They studied different forms of adolescent victimisation- including maltreatment, neglect, bullying, crime, sexual victimisation, and family violence- which were identified in interviews with the participants when they turned 18. Among their findings was that over a third of the sample had experienced one severe form of victimisation during their adolescence and 7 per cent had experienced at least three or more severe types of victimisation. Almost 20 per cent (18.9%) had had some form of self-injurious thoughts and behaviours. Victimized adolescents had an increased risk of suicidal ideation and over a quarter had atempted suicide.  

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Abstract

Objective

Victimized adolescents have elevated risk of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors. However, poor understanding of causal and non-causal mechanisms underlying this observed risk limits the development of interventions to prevent premature death among adolescents. We tested whether pre-existing family-wide and individual vulnerabilities account for victimized adolescents’ elevated risk of self-injurious thoughts and behaviors.


Method

Participants were 2,232 British children followed from birth to age 18 as part of the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) Longitudinal Twin Study. Adolescent victimization (maltreatment, neglect, sexual victimization, family violence, peer/sibling victimization, cyber-victimization, and crime victimization) was assessed through interviews with participants and co-informant questionnaires at the age 18 assessment. Suicidal ideation, self-harm, and suicide attempt in adolescence were assessed through interviews with participants at age 18.

Results

Victimized adolescents had an increased risk of suicidal ideation, self-harm, and suicide attempt. Co-twin control and propensity-score matching analyses showed that these associations were largely accounted for pre-existing familial and individual vulnerabilities, respectively. Over and above their prior vulnerabilities, victimized adolescents still showed a modest elevation in risk for suicidal ideation.

Conclusion

Risk for self-injurious thoughts and behaviors in victimized adolescents is only partly explained by the experience of victimization. Pre-existing vulnerabilities account for a large proportion of the risk. Therefore, effective interventions to prevent premature death in victimized adolescents should not only target the experience of victimization but also address pre-existing vulnerabilities.

The article is in press but may be requested through interlibrary loan by Rotherham NHS staff 

In the news:

BBC News Teenage victims ‘more likely to self-harm’

Child development in the early years

Local Government Association | December 2018 | Child development in the early years

Child development in the early years is a new guide from the Local Government Association. The guide sets out;

  • why the early years are crucial to future outcomes and wellbeing
  • the measures being taken by local authorities to bring together health, social care and early education services to create a more holistic approach to identifying and meeting the needs of young children and their families
  •  making provision more efficient and effective; and an idea of the increasing range of interventions available to address particular issues early, before they escalate into more damaging (and expensive) problems

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Case studies are used to highlight the importance of evidence-based practice, and of local authorities and area partnerships making sure that they commission provision and implement changes which fully reflect the particular local needs and priorities of their communities. (Source: Local Government Association).

The ‘assets’ needed for a healthy life

This report investigates some of the key issues impacting young people’s transition into adulthood | The Health Foundation

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Image source: http://www.health.org.uk

‘A place to grow’  is the second report in the Health Foundation’s Young people’s future health inquiry and is the result of engagement with over 600 young people aged 16 to 24 from five distinct areas across the UK.

The report highlights how optimistic, energetic and committed young people are — but how their health and wellbeing is already being eroded by day-to-day pressures.

Key points

  • In five UK towns and cities, the Young people’s future health inquiry team listened to the perspectives of young people and youth organisations about access to the assets needed for a healthy transition into adulthood.
  • Our visits uncovered common themes and a strong sense of place, shaping the young people’s identity and how they described themselves.
  • But young people’s access to the opportunities and relationships that can ensure a healthy future varies across the UK.
  • Young people are profoundly affected by the nature of their local economy, housing and labour markets, and by the strength of the social fabric around them.

Full document: A place to grow. Exploring the future health of young people in five sites across the UK

Supporting young people through transition into adult care services (Sheffield Teaching Hospitals)

NHS England | November 2018 | Supporting young people through transition into adult care services 

Nurses at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals Foundation Trust (STHFT) recognised unwarranted variation in practice within the Trust where children were being transitioned between services, recognising gaps within coordination, information available to children and families and in some clinical specialist service areas, leading to delays in care.

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This led to the creation of a new role: the Children and Young People Lead Nurse  to support children and young people in transitioning between children’s and adult services, offering support to all clinical specialist areas within the hospital. The Children and Young People Lead Nurse engages with families, children and young people with complex needs and provides specialist advice and support to staff to ensure prompt, safe transition into adult services. This role also aimed to support the development of pathways and standardised practice to ensure high quality care at transition was available to all complex needs children within the Trust.

The Lead Nurse developed the role by working seamlessly with the transition team at Sheffield Children’s Hospital and establishing a dedicated caseload of children and young people, to give a clear overview of the transition work being carried out by each clinical specialty. They provide education and training sessions for staff and partner agencies in understanding the needs of adolescents, as well as those with complex needs.

This yielded:

  • better outcomes
  • better experience
  • better use of resources  (Source: NHS England)

Full case study is available from NHS England