Unacceptable inequalities in health outcomes” for LGBT people “glare out wherever you look”

Commons Select Committee | October 2019| Unacceptable inequalities in health outcomes” for LGBT people “glare out wherever you look”

LGBT people are being let down in health and social care, by structures and services that are not inclusive or designed with them in mind, and by a lack of leadership in Government, NHS and social services.

In the report Health and Social Care and LGBT Communities published today (22 October), the Women and Equalities Committee has found that too often LGBT people are expected to fit into systems that assume they are straight and cisgender. But the Committee has found that deep inequalities exist in health outcomes for these communities and that treating them “the same” as non-LGBT people will not address these poor outcomes (Source: Commons Select Committee).

Full Commons Select Committee press release 

Read the summary

Read the conclusions and recommendations

Read the full report

New country profiles show changes in environmental health inequalities

World Health Organization | October  2019 | New country profiles show changes in environmental health inequalities

New country profiles released by the WHO European Centre for Environment and Health show how countries across the WHO European Region have achieved reductions in some areas of environmental health inequalities (Source: WHO)

euro.who.int

A health index for England: opportunities and challenges

The Health Foundation | October 2019| A health index for England: opportunities and challenges

A new long read from The Health Foundation explore the government’s proposal to make health a core measure of government success by creating a national health index for England. 

health.org.uk
Image source: health.org.uk

The long read considers:

  • Why develop a new national health measure?
  • What would a new health measure look like – and what are the potential problems?
  • What measures of health should we use?
  • How could government get the most out of a national health measure?

The Health Foundation 

 

Health inequalities: place-based approaches to reduce inequalities

Public Health England | July 2019 | Health inequalities: place-based approaches to reduce inequalities

Public Health England (PHE) has published Health inequalities: place-based approaches to reduce inequalities; the aims of the ‘place-based approaches for reducing health inequalities’ are to:

  • reinforce a common understanding of the complex causes and costs of health inequalities
  • provide a practical framework and tools for places to reduce health inequalities

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Place-based approaches for reducing health inequalities: foreword and executive summar

Place-based approaches for reducing health inequalities: main report

More documents available from PHE

See also:

PHE blog

WHO: Environmental health inequalities in Europe. Second assessment report (2019)

World Health Organization | June 2019 | Environmental health inequalities in Europe. Second assessment report (2019)

An assessment report from the World Health Organization (WHO) considers the distribution of environmental risks and injuries within countries and shows that unequal environment conditions, risk exposures and related health outcomes affect citizens daily in their lives wherever people, live, work and spend their time.

euro.who.int
Image source: euro.who.int

The report documents the magnitude of environmental health inequalities within countries through 19 inequality indicators on urban, housing and working conditions, basic services and injuries. Inequalities in risks and outcomes occur in all countries in the WHO European Region, and the latest evidence confirms that socially disadvantaged population subgroups are those most affected by environmental hazards, causing avoidable health effects and contributing to health inequalities.

The results call for more environmental and intersectoral action to identify and protect those who already carry a disproportionate environmental burden (Source: WHO).

Summary report 

Full publication available from WHO 

 

Preventable deaths and deprivation

These charts show that the risk of preventable deaths is at least three times higher for people living in the most deprived local areas compared to those living in the least deprived | The Health Foundation

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In May 2019 the Office for National Statistics published the latest statistics related to avoidable mortality and socioeconomic inequalities. This explores deaths that are considered avoidable in the presence of timely and effective health care (amendable mortality) or public health interventions (preventable mortality).

The data show that the risk of preventable deaths is at least three times higher for people living in the most deprived 10% of local areas compared to the least deprived 10%.

While the preventable mortality rate has fallen since 2001, its fallen at a faster rate for people living in the least deprived local areas. Between 2001 and 2017 it fell by 36% for the least deprived 10% of areas, but only 25% for the most deprived 10% of areas.

Full detail at The Health Foundation