Dementia UK: ‘Together again’

Dementia UK have created a short animated film to show the differences Admiral nurses make in bringing families affected by dementia together again, even for the briefest of moments.

This animation explores those feelings of being lost in dementia – and how the support and guidance of an Admiral Nurse can help bring people back together again.

 

More about Dementia UK and the Admiral Nurse Service available here

Every nurse an eNurse

The Royal College of Nursing  (RCN), in partnership with NHS Digital,  and the Building a Digital Ready Workforce Programme,  is launching a UK-wide consultation to hear about the digital challenges faced by nursing staff.   The consultation seeks to learn more about  adapting to digital technologies, and the opportunities available to improve patient care.

rcn digital ready consultation
Image source: RCN. http://www.rcn.org.uk

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The RCN will ask nurses across the country, working in different sectors:

  • What will the digital future of nursing look like?
  • What will help us to get the best out of the data and technology available?
  • What are the things that might stand in our way?
  • What are the great examples where things are working that we should share?

The results will support the RCN’s call for improved education, training and development on digital literacy.  The aim is that by 2020 “evey nurse will be an eNurse” – that is every nurse will be able to use technology and data to maximum effect for patients, carers and service users.

Further information on the Digital Ready consultation is available from the RCN’s website

Register now to join the conversation; the online workshop will run until 15 February 2018 link here. 

 

 

Nursing workforce

The Health Committee has published The nursing workforce.  This report examines the current and future scale of the shortfall of nursing staff and whether the Government and responsible bodies have effective plans to recruit, train and retain nurses.  The committee concludes that there has been too little attention given to retaining nurses which has resulted in more nurses now leaving than joining the professional register.  There are many causes for this shortfall, including workload pressures, poor access to continuing professional development, pay and a general sense of not feeling valued.

Dignity in health care for people with learning disabilities

Dignity in health care for people with learning disabilities | The Royal College of Nursing  

rcn
Image source: http://www.rcn.org.uk

This guidance aims to improve dignity in health care for people with learning disabilities.  It is designed particularly to support the nursing workforce but other health care and social care staff may find this useful.

The guidance concludes with information relating to the particular health needs that people with learning disabilities may have, and provides ideas on working in collaboration with other service providers.

Full guidance available here

The Role of Nurses in Alcohol and Drug Treatment Services

Guidance for commissioners, providers and clinicians on the roles of nurses in alcohol and drug treatment in England. | Public Health England

This resource describes the many potential roles of nurses in alcohol and drug treatment in England to help commissioners and providers of specialist adult alcohol and drug treatment services to recruit the right workforce to meet local needs.

The document outlines:

  • The roles of nurses working in alcohol and drug treatment including the contribution they can make to health and social care outcomes
  • The added value nurses can bring to alcohol and drug treatment
  • The competences and skills that should be expected of nurses working in alcohol and drug treatment
  • What is required to develop and maintain these competences

Full document: The Role of Nurses in Alcohol and Drug Treatment Services:  A resource for commissioners, providers and clinicians

NHS staff shortages are compromising patient care

New report from the Royal College of Nursing calls for urgent review of Nurse staffing levels to ensure patient safety this winter. 

rcn
Image source: http://www.rcn.org.uk

The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) has today published a report, Safe and Effective Staffing: Nursing Against the Odds which shows the results of a recent staff survey. The survey, carried out in May 2017  reveals more than half (55%) say shifts did not have the level of nurses planned, and that shortages were compromising patient care (53% ).

Nursing staff in all four UK countries were asked about staffing levels on their most recent shift and the quality of care provided. More than a third (36%) report having to leave elements of patient care undone due to a lack of time, while two thirds (65%) work an unpaid extra hour on average.

Seven in 10 nurses (71%) in England said their last daytime shift exceeded NICE guidelines, which states that more than eight patients to one nurse should act as a ‘red flag’. A quarter (26%) reported shifts with 14 or more patients per nurse.

The respondents also reported that:

  • patients are no longer afforded enough dignity, even dying alone;
  • colleagues have burned out and have become sick themselves, unable to come to work;
  • staff leave work “sobbing” at the impact of shortages on patient care;
  • many question their future in nursing and contemplate leaving the profession;
  • they struggle to give their children and families enough support after shifts that can exceed 12 hours.

Full report: Safe and Effective Staffing: Nursing Against the Odds

Royal College of Nursing: Urgent action needed to tackle staffing crisis

Related:

Day in the life of a General Practice Nurse

Health Education England today launches a short film showcasing a day in the life of a general practice nurse | HEE

The film shows the depth and breadth of activities a general practice nurse can get involved with in a regular day.

This has been developed as part of the General Practice Nursing Workforce Development Plan to help promote the importance of expanding and developing the general practice nursing workforce.

Targeted at pre-registration student nurses and those that want to transition into general practice from other areas – have a look at the HEE website to find out if this could be the career for you.

Find the full overview here