The Role of Nurses in Alcohol and Drug Treatment Services

Guidance for commissioners, providers and clinicians on the roles of nurses in alcohol and drug treatment in England. | Public Health England

This resource describes the many potential roles of nurses in alcohol and drug treatment in England to help commissioners and providers of specialist adult alcohol and drug treatment services to recruit the right workforce to meet local needs.

The document outlines:

  • The roles of nurses working in alcohol and drug treatment including the contribution they can make to health and social care outcomes
  • The added value nurses can bring to alcohol and drug treatment
  • The competences and skills that should be expected of nurses working in alcohol and drug treatment
  • What is required to develop and maintain these competences

Full document: The Role of Nurses in Alcohol and Drug Treatment Services:  A resource for commissioners, providers and clinicians

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NHS staff shortages are compromising patient care

New report from the Royal College of Nursing calls for urgent review of Nurse staffing levels to ensure patient safety this winter. 

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Image source: http://www.rcn.org.uk

The Royal College of Nursing (RCN) has today published a report, Safe and Effective Staffing: Nursing Against the Odds which shows the results of a recent staff survey. The survey, carried out in May 2017  reveals more than half (55%) say shifts did not have the level of nurses planned, and that shortages were compromising patient care (53% ).

Nursing staff in all four UK countries were asked about staffing levels on their most recent shift and the quality of care provided. More than a third (36%) report having to leave elements of patient care undone due to a lack of time, while two thirds (65%) work an unpaid extra hour on average.

Seven in 10 nurses (71%) in England said their last daytime shift exceeded NICE guidelines, which states that more than eight patients to one nurse should act as a ‘red flag’. A quarter (26%) reported shifts with 14 or more patients per nurse.

The respondents also reported that:

  • patients are no longer afforded enough dignity, even dying alone;
  • colleagues have burned out and have become sick themselves, unable to come to work;
  • staff leave work “sobbing” at the impact of shortages on patient care;
  • many question their future in nursing and contemplate leaving the profession;
  • they struggle to give their children and families enough support after shifts that can exceed 12 hours.

Full report: Safe and Effective Staffing: Nursing Against the Odds

Royal College of Nursing: Urgent action needed to tackle staffing crisis

Related:

Day in the life of a General Practice Nurse

Health Education England today launches a short film showcasing a day in the life of a general practice nurse | HEE

The film shows the depth and breadth of activities a general practice nurse can get involved with in a regular day.

This has been developed as part of the General Practice Nursing Workforce Development Plan to help promote the importance of expanding and developing the general practice nursing workforce.

Targeted at pre-registration student nurses and those that want to transition into general practice from other areas – have a look at the HEE website to find out if this could be the career for you.

Find the full overview here

The Recruitment, Retention And Return Of Nurses To General Practice Nursing In England

This report, authored by Ipsos MORI, outlines the findings of qualitative research into the drivers and barriers to entry into general practice nursing (GPN) | NHS England

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It finds that the general perception is that general practice is more suitable for older or more experienced nurses. As student placements in general practice are rare, there is a lack of opportunity for students to develop an understanding of the GPN role. The research also highlights the need for greater support for GPNs and the lack of standardisation in pay for GPN roles.

Staff nurses as antimicrobial stewards

An integrative literature review | American Journal of Infection Control

Background: Guidelines on antimicrobial stewardship emphasize the importance of an interdisciplinary team, but current practice focuses primarily on defining the role of infectious disease physicians and pharmacists; the role of inpatient staff nurses as antimicrobial stewards is largely unexplored.

Methods: An updated integrative review method guided a systematic appraisal of 13 articles spanning January 2007-June 2016. Quantitative and qualitative peer-reviewed publications including staff nurses and antimicrobial knowledge or stewardship were incorporated into the analysis.

Results: Two predominant themes emerged from this review: (1) nursing knowledge, education, and information needs; and (2) patient safety and organizational factors influencing antibiotic management.

Discussion: Focused consideration to empower and educate staff nurses in antimicrobial management is needed to strengthen collaboration and build an interprofessional stewardship workforce.

Full reference: Monsees, E. et al. (2017) Staff nurses as antimicrobial stewards: An integrative literature review. American Journal of Infection Control. Vol. 45 (no. 8) pp. 917–922

Government ‘reneging on promise to fund 10,000 extra nursing places’ | via @guardiannews

Scrapping nursing bursaries was supposed to expand training places – but that pledge has been quietly dropped, universities say | The Guardian

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Universities are warning that the government is quietly reneging on its promise to provide 10,000 new nursing degree places, intended to relieve pressure on the NHS.

Student nurses must spend 50% of their degree working under supervision, usually in a hospital. But universities have told Education Guardian that not a single extra nursing training place has been funded or allocated for the future. It would cost £15m over five years to fund training placements for 10,000 new nurses, according to the Council of Deans of Health, the body that represents university faculties of nursing.

Applications to study nursing in the new 2017-18 academic year have slumped by 23% compared with last year, after the abolition of bursaries. The government said last year it would free up £800m and pay for an extra 10,000 places by ending bursaries and shifting student nurses to the standard system of £9,000-a-year tuition fees supported by loans. Angry academics now say this was a hollow promise.

Read the full news story here

“I’m Still Here”: Personhood and the Early-Onset Dementia Experience

The current study examined the lived experience from the point of view of four adults younger than 65 with dementia, particularly how they perceive their personhood | Journal of Gerontological Nursing

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Using interpretative phenomenological analysis as the research approach, findings revealed that the EOD experience can be incorporated into six themes: (a) A Personal Journey, (b) Navigating the System, (c) The Stigma of Dementia, (d) Connecting to the World, (e) A Story Worth Telling, and (f) I’m Still Here. Participants’ stories, as presented via these six thematic threads, reveal that individuals with EOD can have a strong sense of personhood. Findings are discussed and situated within the current EOD body of knowledge, and new knowledge is presented. Implications for practice and recommendations for future research are discussed.

Full reference: Sakamoto, M.L. et al. (2017) “I’m Still Here”: Personhood and the Early-Onset Dementia Experience. Journal of Gerontological Nursing. 43(5) pp. 12-17