(Quality Watch) Care for people with serious illnesses

Nuffield Trust | April 2019 | Care for people with serious illnesses

Care for people with serious illnesses includes a summary of Nuffield Trust’s indicators relating to conditions that cause very high levels of mortality

People with these non-communicable diseases should be cared for according to National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) clinical guidelines and the standards set out in the NHS Constitution. Following these guidelines will help to ensure that patients receive high-quality care that will enable their conditions to be managed in the best possible way.

The Nuffield Trust used trend data from national clinical audits to look at changes in the quality of care for patients with heart attack, stroke, diabetes and COPD. They also updated our cancer waiting times indicators using data from NHS England.

Further details from Nuffield Trust 

How to address the challenge of multimorbidity?

Nuffield Trust | April 2019 | How to address the challenge of multimorbidity?

A quarter of UK adults are living with two or more long-term health problems (multimorbidity), more than 14 million people in England alone, in a new Nuffield Trust blog post, Charlotte Paddison argues for two key changes in how multimorbidity is tackled. She identifies that change is needed in two areas: 

  • Shift in professional practice
  • Look beyond health services

Full blog post at Nuffield Trust 

See also BMJ for earlier version of post

Key areas for action on the health and care workforce

Closing the gap: Key areas for action on the health and care workforce | Nuffield Trust |  The King’s Fund | The Health Foundation

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Staffing is the make-or-break issue for the NHS in England. Workforce shortages are already having a direct impact on patient care and staff experience. This report calls for urgent action to avoid a vicious cycle of growing shortages and declining quality. The workforce implementation plan to be published later this year presents a pivotal opportunity to do this.

In this report, experts from the Nuffield Trust, The King’s Fund and the Health Foundation set out a series of policy actions that, evidence suggests, should be at the heart of the workforce implementation plan. This report focuses on nursing and general practice, where the workforce problems are particularly severe. The authors suggest a number of high-impact policy actions which, if properly funded and well implemented across the NHS would over time create a sustainable model for general practice and help to eliminate nursing shortages. These will require investment of an extra £900 million per year by 2023/24 into the budget of Health Education England.

Closing the gap: Key areas for action on the health and care workforce – full report

Closing the gap: Key areas for action on the health and care workforce – overview

See also: Offer £5,200 grants to nursing students and ramp up overseas recruitment to stop NHS workforce crisis | The Kings Fund

 

Public satisfaction with the NHS and social care in 2018

Since 1983, NatCen Social Research’s British Social Attitudes survey has asked members of the public in England, Scotland and Wales about their views on the NHS and health and care issues more generally.  Alongside the Nuffield Trust, in this publication the King’s Fund  explores the findings from the 2018 survey.

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Image source: http://www.kingsfund.org.uk

The BSA is a ‘gold standard’ survey and is conducted the same way every year, with the data provideing a rich time trend going back to 1983. This adds a depth and context to the findings that no other measure of NHS satisfaction provides. As a result, when satisfaction changes in the BSA, we are as confident as we can be that it reflects a genuine change in public attitudes.

Key findings

Satisfaction with the NHS overall in 2018

  • Public satisfaction with the NHS overall continued to fall in 2018. Overall satisfaction was 53 per cent – a 3 percentage point drop from the previous year and the lowest level since 2007.
  • Older people were more satisfied than younger people: 61 per cent of those aged 65 and over were satisfied with the NHS compared to 51 per cent of those aged 18–64.
  • Satisfaction levels also differed between supporters of different political parties: 58 per cent of supporters of the Conservative party were satisfied compared to 51 per cent of supporters of the Labour party.
  • The four main reasons people gave for being satisfied with the NHS overall were: the quality of care; the fact that the NHS is free at the point of use; the range of services and treatments available; and the attitudes and behaviour of NHS staff.
  • The four main reasons people gave for being dissatisfied with the NHS overall were: long waiting times; staff shortages; a lack of funding; and money being wasted.

Full detail at The King’s Fund

Full publication: Public satisfaction with the NHS and social care in 2018: Results from the British Social Attitudes survey

See also:

Health and wellbeing in adolescence and early adulthood

International comparisons of health and wellbeing in adolescence and early adulthood | The Nuffield Trust & The Association for Young People’s Health 

Young people aged 10–24 make up approximately a fifth of the population of most high-income countries and there are strong health and economic arguments for improving their health outcomes. This joint report from The Nuffield Trust & The Association for Young People’s Health summarises how 17 key indicators of the health and wellbeing of young people aged 10–24 vary in a selection of 19 similar high-income countries both within and outside of Europe.

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Image source: http://www.nuffieldtrust.org.uk

The report, published with the Association for Young People’s Health, provides an indication of where health outcomes for adolescents and young adults in the United Kingdom (UK) could be improved. Despite some successes, the UK’s performance on the 17 key health and wellbeing indicators highlighted in this report often lags behind that of the other 18 countries included in the analysis and there is much room for improvement.

Key findings

The UK is performing least well in the following areas. It has:

  • the highest rates of obesity for 15- to 19-year-olds among 14 European comparator countries
  • the highest inequalities in obesity prevalence between the richest and poorest, apart from Finland, in countries where data are available
  • the highest rate of young people aged 16–24 living with a longstanding condition among 14 European comparator countries apart from Finland and Sweden
  • low rates of engagement in exercise by 11-year-olds in England and Wales
  • the highest asthma death rate for those aged 10–24 among all 19 countries apart from Australia, New Zealand and the United States (US)
  • the highest rate of adolescent girls aged 15–19 giving birth among all 19 countries apart from New Zealand and the US
  • a high percentage of young people aged 15-19 not in education, employment or training (NEET)
  • high rates of severe material deprivation among 15- to 24-year-olds
  • a high burden-of-disease rate for all causes, and in particular for type 1 diabetes.

Full report:
International comparisons of health and wellbeing in adolescence and early adulthood

See also:

Age UK’s Personalised Integrated Care Programme: Evaluation Of Impact On Hospital Activity

Nuffield Trust | February 2019 | Age UK’s Personalised Integrated Care Programme: Evaluation Of Impact On Hospital Activity

Age UK commissioned the Nuffield Trust to conduct a detailed evaluation of a scheme providing personalised care for older people. Given the severe pressure on health and care services across England, could this scheme help local systems by reducing the numbers of people being admitted to hospital in an emergency? 

nuffieldtrust.org.uk
Image source: nuffieldtrust.org.uk

Read the full piece from Nuffield Trust

Download the publication Age UK’s Personalised Integrated Care Programme